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eBook American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II ePub

eBook American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II ePub

by Eric L. Muller

  • ISBN: 0807831735
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Eric L. Muller
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; F First Edition edition (October 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 214
  • ePub book: 1395 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1853 kb
  • Other: azw doc rtf azw
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 236

Description

Eric L. Muller's excellent new book, The American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese . government agency worked with the military and intelligence communities to determine who was in fact a 'true' American.

Eric L. Muller's excellent new book, The American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese Disloyalty in World War II sheds new insights into another dark moment in American history. Muller has written a valuable study with important contemporary ramifications. History News Network. The author places this work within the broader context of history and ties into the development of subsequent loyalty programs to ferret out communists during the Cold Wa. .

American Inquisition book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In this study of the Japanese American internment, Eric L. Muller focuses on a single, though crucial element of the wholesale incarceration of American citizens of Japanese descent during World War II: the determination of Nisei loyalty to the United States

In this study of the Japanese American internment, Eric L. Muller focuses on a single, though crucial element of the wholesale incarceration of American citizens of Japanese descent during World War II: the determination of Nisei loyalty to the United States

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. American Inquisition is the only study of the Japanese American internment to examine the complex inner workings of the most draconian system of loyalty screening that the American government has ever deployed against its own citizens. At a time when our nation again finds itself beset by worries about an "enemy within" considered identifiable by race or religion, this volume offers crucial lessons from a recent and disastrous history.

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In American Inquisition, Eric Muller relates t.

In American Inquisition, Eric Muller relates th. Excerpt. ASKED TO NAME a time when the government judged the loyalty of large numbers of American citizens, most people would probably cite the period often called the Second Red Scare. This study examines the mechanisms that the federal government created to judge the loyalty of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry during World War II. This story is not well known, even in the sizable literature on the Japanese American internment.

Eric Leigh Muller (born September 5, 1962) is the Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor in Jurisprudence and Ethics at. Moore Distinguished Professor in Jurisprudence and Ethics at the University of North Carolina School of La. He is also the author of American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II which was published in 2007 by the University of North Carolina Press and Free to Die for their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II which was published in 2001 by the University of Chicago Press and was named.

In American Inquisition, Eric Muller relates the untold story of exactly how military and civilian bureaucrats judged these tens of thousands of American citizens during wartime. Some citizens were deemed loyal and were freed, but one in four was declared disloyal to America and condemned to repressive segregation in the camps or barred from war-related jobs

Q: How does AMERICAN INQUISITION differ from other studies on Japanese internment during World War II? . Q: The Japanese loyalty questionnaire is central to your book. Can you explain what the form was and the significance it had for Japanese internees?

Q: How does AMERICAN INQUISITION differ from other studies on Japanese internment during World War II? A: AMERICAN INQUISITION focuses on what you might call the "inner workings" of the Japanese American internment-the tribunals in the bowels of the wartime bureaucracy that tried to decide which Japanese Americans were loyal to the United States and which were disloyal. Can you explain what the form was and the significance it had for Japanese internees?

H. Eugene and Lillian Youngs Lehman.

H. By (author) Eric L.

When the U.S. government forced 70,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry into internment camps in 1942, it created administrative tribunals to pass judgment on who was loyal and who was disloyal. In American Inquisition, Eric Muller relates the untold story of exactly how military and civilian bureaucrats judged these tens of thousands of American citizens during wartime. Some citizens were deemed loyal and were freed, but one in four was declared disloyal to America and condemned to repressive segregation in the camps or barred from war-related jobs. Using cultural and religious affiliations as indicators of Americans' loyalties, the far-reaching bureaucratic decisions often reflected the agendas of the agencies that performed them rather than the actual allegiances or threats posed by the citizens being judged, Muller explains.American Inquisition is the only study of the Japanese American internment to examine the complex inner workings of the most draconian system of loyalty screening that the American government has ever deployed against its own citizens. At a time when our nation again finds itself beset by worries about an "enemy within" considered identifiable by race or religion, this volume offers crucial lessons from a recent and disastrous history.

Comments

Samowar Samowar
A well-documented report on a very interesting topic.
Brazil Brazil
American Inquisition is a study of a single facet of the Japanese-American experience during World War Two: how government agencies addressed the question of Japanese-American loyalty while making decisions that impacted the freedom of Japanese-Americans from the West Coast. The author's research is exhaustive, including meeting notes, camp records, and court transcripts, and the work is well organized.

Especially interesting to me were the contending views of Japanese-American loyalty by the government agencies passing judgment: the Provost Marshall General's Office and the Western Defense Command, which generally approached the question with a deep racial bias and the assumption that Japanese-Americans were inherently disloyal; the War Relocation Authority, which had the strange position of both managing the internment of Japanese-Americans but generally presuming the basic loyalty of most internees.

This is my oversimplification, but generally, the military leaned towards indefinite mass detention, and the WRA wanted to release the majority of internees as quickly as possible, and was deeply concerned about the human costs of the internment. Additionally, the reasons for continuing mass detention late in the war grew increasingly political, with little military justification. Finally, the author repeatedly makes the case that any attempt to ascertain the loyalty of citizens without an emphasis on acts against the US tends to more accurately reveal the bias of the interrogator more than the feelings of those being interrogated.

It may be a dry read to some, but I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about how bureaucratic institutions go about implementing the systematic denial of basic rights. And while it is a good read for anyone wanting to know about the context of the wartime incarceration of those of Japanese descent living on the West Coast during the war, it's about the government machinery, not about the personal experiences of those actually imprisoned during the war.
Xwnaydan Xwnaydan
Contrary to the first review, I believe that Eric Muller's book is an important and timely study of the Japanese American internment, and while narrowly focused on the question of "loyalty," this question and how it was determined and the racial prejudices that were exhibited by the various military agencies and WRA point to the ways in which the line between those deemed "loyal" and "disloyal" were arbitrarily drawn, largely by the prejudices of those involved (DeWitt being foremost among those who has been documented as saying that the internment was revenge for Pearl Harbor--a troubled and flawed and revealing comment if ever there was one since it demonstrated that DeWitt, like to many others during WWII could not distinguish between Japanese nationals, Japanese miltitary, Japanese in America of the first generation unable to apply for citizenship due to racist immigration/citizenship laws, and Japanese Americans whose cultural influences included Mickey Mouse, the Boyscouts, and American jazz, as well as Akido, Sushi, and Buddhist practices).

The work that Muller has done will resonate with the questions we are currently facing as a society living in a post-9/11 world; Muslim and Arabs living in America are at risk in a similar way currently. We need to remember the lesson of internment and this question of "loyalty" as not being commensurate with race or religion.
Peles Peles
This book is well researched and written in a manner that, although scholarly, is very readable and full of information of facts not previously known to me. In the light of the current state of afairs in our country, this book points out how we have previously acted under the stress of war.
Iriar Iriar
There were many inaccuracies in this book regarding Dr. George Ochikubo. Much data was gathered from the national archives written by persons that did not care for Dr. Ochikubo due to the fact that he embarassed them in the courts. One of the discrepancy was that he did not speak the Japanese language. The fact is that he was fluent in the language because his grandparents only spoke Japanese. That was his only method to communicate with his parents.