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eBook Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists ePub

eBook Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists ePub

by Mary Susannah Robbins

  • ISBN: 0742559149
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Mary Susannah Robbins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers; Revised edition (May 22, 2007)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1155 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1629 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 810

Description

This is an outstanding collection of writings by anti-Vietnam war activists that gives a vivid sense of the range of principles . Growing up in a village during the "Vietnam War" I had suffered a great deal along side my family, relatives, and friends. Many of them had been killed by American bombs.

This is an outstanding collection of writings by anti-Vietnam war activists that gives a vivid sense of the range of principles and passions that motivated one of the largest and most influential social movements in American history. We hear from scholars and soldiers, senators and students, clergy, journalists, conscientious objectors, grassroots organizers and national mobilizers, some well-known and others from the rank-and-file of the movement.

Against the Vietnam War book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mary Susannah Robbins, ed. Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2007.

Against the Vietnam War" brings together the different facets of that movement and its various shades of opinion. Here the participants themselves offer statements and reflections on their activism, the era, and the consequences of a war that spanned three decades and changed the United States of America

Against the Vietnam War brings together the different facets of that movement and its various shades of opinion. Mary Susannah Robbins, P.

Against the Vietnam War brings together the different facets of that movement and its various shades of opinion. Here the participants themselves offer statements and reflections on their activism, the era, and the consequences of a war that spanned three decades and changed the United States of America. The keynote is on individual experience in a time when almost every event had national and international significance.

Robbins, Mary Susannah, 1946-.

Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists, Mary Susannah Robbins, pages 78-90. On December 26, 1971, fifteen VVAW activists barricaded and occupied the Statue of Liberty for two days to bring attention to their cause. Lexington Minute-Man Newspaper, 23 May 1991. Simultaneous protests took place at other sites across the country, such as the historic Betsy Ross house in Philadelphia (for 45 minutes) and Travis Air Force Base in California (for 12 hours).

Writings by Activists. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Incorporated. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring.

Mandelstam, Myself Included - Mary Susannah Robbins. Like all of her visual and verbal art, Mary Susannah Robbins is full of surprises. I have never met Susannah in person, though we have spent many hours together on the telephone. As a contributor to a couple of her splendid books-Against the Vietnam War: Writings by Activists and Peace Not Terror: Leaders of the Antiwar Movement Speak Out Against Foreign Policy Post 9/11-I was at first skeptical about the prospects of her actually getting publishers and an audience for these two volumes amid the deafening drumbeats of. war that continually thunder across our mass media.

Robbins, Mary Susannah, Ed. Against the Vietnam War, Writings by Activists

Robbins, Mary Susannah, Ed. Against the Vietnam War, Writings by Activists. Declaration of Independence from the War. Pages 100-110. New York, Syracuse University Press. 1999: This article, written by legendary civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, J. draws a connection between the fight for civil rights and the struggle for peace. Dr. King preaches that there is no true difference between the two causes of protest. He writes to an audience of Americans, rather than solely African Americans, about their responsibility as human beings to end conflict. One example used by Dr. King.

For some, it was a movement for peace. For others, it was a war against the war. In the eyes of certain participants, the movement was cultural and social at its core, a matter of changing society. Still others defined their protests as political and sought out the economic root causes of the war. What many would agree upon was that it was a time when a remarkable generation came of age and a great nation was shaken to its very foundations.The protest movement in opposition to the Vietnam War was a complex amalgam of political, social, economic, and cultural motivations, factors, and events. Against the Vietnam War brings together the different facets of that movement and its various shades of opinion. Here the participants themselves offer statements and reflections on their activism, the era, and the consequences of a war that spanned three decades and changed the United States of America. The keynote is on individual experience in a time when almost every event had national and international significance.A foreword by Staughton Lynd considers the events of the Vietnam War in the context of the present war in Iraq.

Comments

Nejind Nejind
Growing up in a village during the "Vietnam War" I had suffered a great deal along side my family, relatives, and friends. Many of them had been killed by American bombs. Among the survivors, those who had been victims of Agent Orange have passed the disease onto their children and grandchildren. There is no future for them. I feel deeply grateful to those Americans who had been brave enough to speak out against that meaningless war and the senseless killing of innocent Vietnamese. There are lessons for the Americans to learn. Will they be willing to learn them?
Doktilar Doktilar
Excellent service for an excellent and important book
Vetitc Vetitc
The review title says it all. I believe for one to get an accurate perspective, one must read both sides. Anyone living through the Vietnam Era and serving in the military through this would truly like to burn this book.
Those that were on the "peace" side need to be thanked. Thank them for aiding a people killing 58,000 American soldiers, thank them for helping kill 4.5 million Laotians, Cambodians and Vietnamese. It was there peace movement that forced the politicans to abandon these people and leave them to be slaughtered by the enemy they aided.
The activists and supporters of the peace movements have the blood of these millions on their hands. This book needs to read by all those that want to know and understand the peace movements of that day and this day are nothing more than appeasements to those wishing to destroy the freedoms so many have died for.
This book is trash.
Jube Jube
Mary Susannah Robbins once again orchestrates a veritable panoply of talent and asks, in a very readable way, "How did we get here?" and, more importantly, "How are we going to get out?" This is not her first literary cry for peace and I sadly suspect not her last...If you are looking for a cogent summary about the state of terrorism and the state of our state, look no further. This is mandatory summer reading for the rightfully concerned.
Jox Jox
This book was definately emotional and insightful. It's not one of a kind, but it comes with my reccomendation. It's full of great primary sources to get you inside the minds of the past.