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eBook Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645-900 (HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE MONOGRAPH SERIES) ePub

eBook Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645-900 (HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE MONOGRAPH SERIES) ePub

by William Wayne Farris

  • ISBN: 0674690311
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: William Wayne Farris
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Asia Center; First Edition edition (June 10, 1985)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1582 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1619 kb
  • Other: doc rtf docx mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 919

Description

W Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 24. Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645–900. William Wayne Farris.

Wayne Farris has developed the first systematic analysis of early Japanese population, the role of disease in economic development, and the impact of agricultural technology and practices. In doing so, he reinterprets the nature of ritsuryō institutions. Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 24.

This is based on an impressively wide and careful study of the official histories, extant administrative and fiscal documents . Series: Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series (Book 24).

This is based on an impressively wide and careful study of the official histories, extant administrative and fiscal documents, and extensive modern Japanese scholarship in such fields as economic history and archaeology. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society). William Wayne Farris is Professor of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645-900 (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series).

From tax and household registers, law codes, and other primary sources, as well as recent Japanese sources, William Wayne Farris has developed the first systematic, scientific analysis of early Japanese population, including the role of disease in economic development. Farris's text is illustrated with maps, population pyramids for five localities, and photographs and translations of portions of tax and household registers, which throw further light on the demography and economy of Japan in the seventh, eighth, and ninth centuries. Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645-900 (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series).

by William Wayne Farris. From tax and household registers, law codes, and other primary sources, as well as recent Japanese sources, William Wayne Farris has developed the first systematic, scientific analysis of early Japanese population, including the role of disease in economic development. This work provides a comprehensive study of land clearance, agricultural technology, and rural settlement.

Farris's text is illustrated with maps, population pyramids for five localities, and photographs and translations of portions of tax and household registers, which throw further light on the demography and economy of Japan in the seventh, eighth, and ninth centuries. Recently added by. SGPP-Indonesia, electra. jp, Nostrand, mjnemelka, lawisejr, timspalding, rntihg. In doing so, he reinterprets the nature of ritsury institutions. Harvard University, Asia Center. This is based on an impressively wide and careful study of the official histories, extant administrative and fiscal documents, and extensive modern Japanese scholarship in such fields as economic history and archaeology.

1995, Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, and the Harvard Yenching Institute, and distributed by the Harvard University Press. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

Elizabeth S. Sato (a1).

Series: Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series. The function and nature of ritsuryō institutions are reinterpreted within the revised demographic and economic setting.

W. W. Farris, Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645–900 (1985). 25. R. Leutner, Shikitei Sanba and the Comic Tradition in Edo Fiction (1985). 26. D. S. Yates, Washing Silk: The Life and Selected Poetry of Wei Chuang (834?–910) (1987). Min, National Polity and Local Power: the Transformation of Later Imperial China (1989). 28. V. H. Mair, Tang Transformation Texts: A Study of the Buddhist Contribution to the Rise of Vernacular Fiction and Drama in China (1989). 29. E. Endicott, Mongolian Rule in China: Local Administration in the Yuan Dynasty (1989)

From tax and household registers, law codes, and other primary sources, as well as recent Japanese sources, William Wayne Farris has developed the first systematic, scientific analysis of early Japanese population, including the role of disease in economic development. This work provides a comprehensive study of land clearance, agricultural technology, and rural settlement. The function and nature of ritsuryō institutions are reinterpreted within the revised demographic and economic setting.

Farris's text is illustrated with maps, population pyramids for five localities, and photographs and translations of portions of tax and household registers, which throw further light on the demography and economy of Japan in the seventh, eighth, and ninth centuries.