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eBook Art Rules: Pierre Bourdieu and the Visual Arts ePub

eBook Art Rules: Pierre Bourdieu and the Visual Arts ePub

by Cheryl Hardy,Michael Grenfell

  • ISBN: 1845202333
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Cheryl Hardy,Michael Grenfell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berg Publishers (January 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1300 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1619 kb
  • Other: mobi doc rtf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 844

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Art Rules: Pierre Bourdie.

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Art Rules analyses Bourdieu's work on the visual arts to provide the first overview of his theory of culture and . In 1992 the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu published Les Regles de l'art later translated as The Rules of Art (1996a)

Art Rules analyses Bourdieu's work on the visual arts to provide the first overview of his theory of culture and aesthetics. Bourdieu's engagement with both postmodernism and the problem of aesthetics provides a new way of analyzing the visual arts. In 1992 the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu published Les Regles de l'art later translated as The Rules of Art (1996a). It is from this book that we have borrowed the title of our own book – Art Rules. in it, we take Bourdieu's ideas and theories, both derived from studies of art and culture, and from other social topics such as education, economics, philosophy and politics, and apply them to a range of art fields.

What Michael Grenfell and Cheryl Hardy attempt to do in Art Rules is to introduce the reader to the thinking of Pierre Bourdieu about art, specifically visual art. Bourdieu was a French sociologist who often found himself at odds with the structuralist and post-structuralist mandarins of th. . Bourdieu was a French sociologist who often found himself at odds with the structuralist and post-structuralist mandarins of the 60s-80s. His work on art is based on study of the things that surround art in our society-the book discusses at great length early work he did on museums involving taking polls of visitors and non-visitors What Michael Grenfell and Cheryl Hardy attempt to do in Art Rules is to introduce the reader to the.

Modern aesthetics has been a preoccupation of writers, artists and philosophers for well over 200 years, since Kant gave it contemporary relevance by defining it as a unique part of human consciousness. In effect, we might see the whole of Bourdieu’s approach to art and aesthetics as an engage- ment with what we mean by truth and how we can articulate it (‘In truth, what is 173 00Art Rules 26/9/06 2:52 pm Page 174 174 Visual Arts in the Twenty-first Century at stake is truth itself’, Bourdieu states at.

Art Rules analyses Bourdieu's work on the visual arts t.Pierre Bourdieu is now recognized as one of the key contemporary critics of culture and the visual arts. Art Rules analyses Bourdieu's work on the visual arts to provide the first overview of his theory of culture and aesthetics.

His work was developed over a fifty year career which took in major studies of education, museums, photography, painting, the media and taste. A new perspective to the Visual Arts in the twenty-first century is provided based on his approach.

Michael Grenfell, Cheryl Hardy. The French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu is now recognized as a major contemporary critique of culture and the Visual Arts

Michael Grenfell, Cheryl Hardy. The French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu is now recognized as a major contemporary critique of culture and the Visual Arts. His work was developed over a fifty year career which took in major studies of education, museums, photography, painting, the media and taste. This book sets out to do what no other has so far achieved. It exclusively addresses Bourdieu’s work on the Visual Arts. Over its three parts and eight chapters it gives an in-depth coverage of Bourdieu’s theory of culture an. ONTINUE READING.

Art Rules Pierre Bourdieu and the Visual Arts. English ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Michael Grenfell and Cheryl Hardy.

Pierre Bourdieu is now recognized as one of the key contemporary critics of culture and the visual arts. Art Rules analyses Bourdieu's work on the visual arts to provide the first overview of his theory of culture and aesthetics.

Bourdieu's engagement with both postmodernism and the 'problem of aesthetics' provides a new way of analysing the visual arts. His interest is in how artistic fields function and the implications their processes have for art and artistic practice.

Art Rules applies Bourdieu's theory of practice to the three fields of museums, photography and painting. These practical examples are used as a springboard to address visual arts in the 21st Century and to establish Bourdieu's 'Rules of Art'.

Comments

Molace Molace
In the rarefied (and expensive) world of the academic journals, you can find a few papers by people who have conducted empirical investigations of Bourdieu's theories. Most of them have concerned his theories on social or cultural capital, not his ideas about art. This is that rarest of animals, a full book-length empirical examination of the art-world, based on Bourdieu.

If you are a graduate student doing sociological or psychological research into art, get a copy of this book before it's too late.
Munigrinn Munigrinn
Have you ever tried to understand the art world by reading art history & theory? Pierre Bourdieu (1930-2002) advocates a wider sociological view of art & culture, arguing that a sociological view moves us beyond the conventional “ art-history” story which he suggests is naïve and a fiction.

Bourdieu’s view is that in modern society art performs the function that religion did in earlier times: art is “a collective act of magic...it offers a view of the absolute, a world beyond the everyday... “ (p.178).

In a capitalist society dominated by the practicalities of providing goods and services, art is set apart in being concerned with the non-practical, it is an area for the struggle over society's non-practical goods, i.e. its symbols.

“Capital” is an important term in Bourdieu. We are familiar with Economic Capital, and understand that it is the amount of money & assets we possess and use to pursue our interests. But equally, Bourdieu argues, we have Social Capital (family connections, professional and social networks) and Cultural Capital (academic qualifications, professional memberships & prizes, accolades, reputation etc). The varying amounts of the different types of Capital that a participant in the art world has influences his/her position in it, and their power to act, to have a say in what is good or bad art; and ultimately, in modern & contemporary art, to say who is an artist and what is art.

Participants in the art world - artists, curators, galleryists, collectors, viewers and buyers, etc - use their Economic, Social and Cultural Capital to promote their interests, because in the artworld what occurs is essentially arbitrary, it needs to be understood in terms of symbols: it does not have any value in itself but gains value because of the subjective rules of the art world.

In art, Bourdieu contends, definitions and categories are fought over with Economic, Social and Cultural Capital. The words used to describe art can mean almost anything: this “fuzziness” of meaning means that words, definitions & categories related to art can be used like stakes in a great game. Different participants may even hold different understandings of the same words and categories while on the same side of a debate. Internal struggle and outward rebellion (but rebellion within strict limits) allow controversies to be stirred up - which in turn are used to publicise participants’ interests. In this way participants in the art debate promote their interests in the struggle of and over symbols!

Earlier classical art was rigid and dominated by the state and the church. Modern artists rebelled against this official art by taking control over subject matter and techniques; in so doing demonstrated an individualism which “matched perfectly” the individualism of the new bourgeois middle-class - from where it drew its support. The high value modern art continues to place on such individualism sometimes leads to an upside-down world in which even lack of skill can sometimes be seen as a highly valued characteristic.

One of Bourdieu’s early studies was into museums & galleries: “the museum is a kind of church” (p.178) in that it upholds a mystical belief system with its own priesthood (artists, critics, galleryists, collectors, adjudicators etc) who hold court over it. Membership is only available to those with the Cultural Capital required to gain entry and ascend thru’ its hierarchies. “Museum visiting …is almost exclusively the domain of the cultivated classes…” (p.67); because others find “in museums the message is too rich, the code too complex to be decoded and, consequently the working-class visitor feels drowned & does not linger” (p.71).

The public museum is an invention of the modern era. Museums became important to the new educated middle class because within them the Economic Capital of the Aristocracy was neutralised (in that in the museum artworks aren’t for sale and viewing is free) and new Cultural Capital (ie education & discrimination) was empowered.

Museums also act as places where the three forms of Capital are traded: Economic Capital can be transformed into Social & Cultural Capital by donating an art collection, building a new wing, etc. Conversely, Cultural Capital, in the form of, say, a respected private art collection, may be turned into “cash” if it is donated to a museum instead of taxes owed to the state.

According to Bourdieu, art revolutionaries do not succeed by skill, talent or the power of ideas alone: he cites notable examples like Flaubert (literature) & Manet (painting), among others, as having significant Social and Economic Capital that enabled them to revolutionise their respective fields of work.

For Bourdieu all relationships in society are ultimately about power - and art is not an isolated part of any society. Despite the apparent rebelliousness of modern art, there is an overlap between cultural power and the wider fields of economic & political power. Art and culture have the power to define or influence the debates in the wider society, to frame what is said within certain values, and maybe more importantly, to keep some ideas out of view. Bourdieu asserts that the irony of modern art is that despite its often unorthodox and controversial forms, it still performs the important function of creating and sustaining hierarchy in society.

This book’s great value is its brevity and that it contextualises Bourdieu: it sketches in the background of critical theory that spans Kant to Bourdieu and afterwards and also illustrates the theory with examples from the English speaking world that might not be in the original French text.

I came across Grenfell & Hardy’s slim volume after reading an article on Bourdieu. The book’s great value is its brevity and that it contextualises Bourdieu: it sketches in the background of critical theory that spans Kant to Bourdieu and afterwards and also illustrates the theory with examples from the English speaking world that might not be in the original French texts. A sociology Phd/lecturer told me he had given up on trying to read Bourdieu’s opus, “La Distinction”, (the English translation, I presume!) he found it such “hard going”. This book, in contrast, is a relatively easy read.

-JOF

Since reading this book I’ve begun to navigate the art world using Bourdieu’s "sociological eyes", identifying the interplay of the three forms of Capital: Economic, Cultural and Social, - and I have found it very instructive indeed!