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eBook Truth: A Guide ePub

eBook Truth: A Guide ePub

by Simon Blackburn

  • ISBN: 0195168240
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Simon Blackburn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1666 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1613 kb
  • Other: doc mbr mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 328

Description

Blackburn's lively new book 'Truth: A Guide' will challenge and surprise yo. .

Blackburn's lively new book 'Truth: A Guide' will challenge and surprise yo.The great achievement of 'Truth' is to encapsulate the major lines of argument on this intractable question within the covers of a book you can read in a day or two. His chapter on Nietzsche, the fountainhead of modern philosophy and the patron saint of relativism, is worth the price of admission by itself. -Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.

The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis-an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"-the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this war are well defined.

An easy-to-read philosophical book on "truth" I will admit is not the easiest thing to write, and Simon Blackburn fails to achieve it with "Truth: A Guide

An easy-to-read philosophical book on "truth" I will admit is not the easiest thing to write, and Simon Blackburn fails to achieve it with "Truth: A Guide. The book greatly lacks clarity and organization and lurches from idea to idea and chapter to chapter. The one exception is a chapter called "Nietzsche: The Arch Debunker," in which that German philosopher's hammer-like prose spurs Blackburn to better clarity.

He has appeared in multiple episodes of the documentary series Closer to Truth. During his long career, he has taught at Oxford University, Cambridge University, and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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Truth: A Guide for the Perplexedby Simon Blackburn 210pp, Allen Lane, £1. 9

Truth: A Guide for the Perplexedby Simon Blackburn 210pp, Allen Lane, £1. 9. In his keynote campaign speech delivered prior to the Vatican election, the man who would be pope, Cardinal Ratzinger, startled the world, or that section of it that was bothered to listen to him, with a tirade against what he saw as a modern-day surrender to relativism. Simon Blackburn is professor of philosophy at Cambridge, and the author of fine popularising books such as The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and Being Good: A Short Introduction to Ethics. He is learned, astute, admirably sensible, and possesses an elegant and clear prose style.

Book's title: Truth : a guide Simon Blackburn. Library of Congress Control Number: 2004019800. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0195168240 (alk. paper). On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database.

Blackburn sees the moving bull's-eye everywhere in the modern world. Much of this book is about long-running battles between absolutists and relativists

Blackburn sees the moving bull's-eye everywhere in the modern world. The Truth has been downgraded to "truth", in "sneer quotes". Much of this book is about long-running battles between absolutists and relativists. The truth remains a reasonable target, principally because it gets results

Book's title: Truth : a guide Simon Blackburn. 121 22. Personal Name: Blackburn, Simon. Publication, Distribution, et. Oxford ; New York. Oxford University Press, (c)2005. Physical Description: xxi, 238 p. ;, 22 cm. Bibliography, etc.

This important book is about truth, and the enemies of truth, and the wars that are fought between them. As Simon Blackburn says in his introduction, "the ground is complicated, strewn with abandoned fortresses and trenches, fought over by shifting alliances". Truth is an essential sure-footed guide through the territory, from classical to modern times. It looks at relativism and absolutism, toleration and belief, objectivity and knowledge, science and pseudo-science, and the moral and political implications, as well as the nuances, of all these.

The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this war are well defined. On one side are those who believe in plain, unvarnished facts, rock-solid truths that can be found through reason and objectivity--that science leads to truth, for instance. Their opponents mock this idea. They see the dark forces of language, culture, power, gender, class, ideology and desire--all subverting our perceptions of the world, and clouding our judgement with false notions of absolute truth. Beginning with an early skirmish in the war--when Socrates confronted the sophists in ancient Athens--Blackburn offers a penetrating look at the longstanding battle these two groups have waged, examining the philosophical battles fought by Plato, Protagoras, William James, David Hume, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, and many others, with a particularly fascinating look at Nietzsche. Among the questions Blackburn considers are: is science mere opinion, can historians understand another historical period, and indeed can one culture ever truly understand another. Blackburn concludes that both sides have merit, and that neither has exclusive ownership of truth. What is important is that, whichever side we embrace, we should know where we stand and what is to be said for our opponents.

Comments

Nirad Nirad
An important and interesting topic, but the author merely surveys the issues as they appear in philosophical history without digging in or committing to a position himself. The result is the reader gains immediacy, but no basis for resolution of what their own views might be. A little more commitment and focus would have been helpful. However, as a well-written survey, it's short and well worth the effort of the reader interested in approaches to truth.
Purestone Purestone
The book was a bit confusing but overall great!
Domarivip Domarivip
Simon Blackburn provides interesting insights into the philosophical problem of truth. While many would like the issue of truth to be an easily resolved question via some simplisitic answer, Blackburn points that while a parsimonious answer might be advantageous as in the case of minimalism or deflationism or even quietism, the issue of truth still continues to persist.
Jack Jack
With the issue of truth, it is all too easy to allow our sympathies towards one side or the other on the nature of truth to ignore the real argument on the other side of the issue. Simon Blackburn does an excellent job digging deep into the position of relativism as well as the usual complaints from "foundationalist" philosophers against relativism. If you are interested in seeing what both sides have to offer intellectually, this is an exceptional guide.
Beahelm Beahelm
Exactly what I wanted. I buy books for instructors who forgot to order on time or ones that are out of print.
Mbon Mbon
The theistic or religious view Blackburn interacts with seems to be unrepresentative of theistic philosophers. It seems to be the defeat of a straw-man which is unrepresentative of the actual substance that you often find in theistic philosophers. I would encourage the inquisitive reader to investigate stronger theistic positions such as you will find among the philosopher Dr. William Lane Craig, Dr. Alvin Plantinga, and Dr. Peter Van Inwagen. As a theist myself, I found myself ashamed of the position Blackburn was arguing against and so I quite understand why he would find it inadequate. However, I don't think it is representative of the theistic position.
Anarius Anarius
If you are interested in delving deeply into the philosophical complexities of the concept of truth, you may well benefit from this book. If you are merely a thoughtful person interested in knowing when you can tell if something is indeed true, I'd advise looking elsewhere.
This is an interesting effort to make a general statement of Blackburn's views on epistemology. Aimed at a general audience, Blackburn covers some different aspects of the realist/anti-realist debate including a taxonomy of realist and anti-realist positions and a brief precis of classical skepticism. Blackburn is appropriately skeptical of anti-realism but very cautious about historic realist positions that require strong metaphysical claims. He adopts a position of 'minimalism' which denies strong metaphysical claims but argues that statements carry with them their own criteria of truth. Minimalism turns out to be a surprisingly strong position as the statements that carry their own truth criteria include all of the natural sciences and indeed almost all of routine life. Though this position originates with work of the great logician Frege, it seems almost too good to be true and in Blackburn's relatively simple presentation, a bit of a linguistic trick. Blackburn is better, I think, in his criticism of anti-realist positions. He does a good job of showing the internal contradictions of many attacks on realism. Richard Rorty, in particular, comes in for some pretty stringent (though polite) criticism for attempting to escape some of the logical extensions of his anti-realism by opening a backdoor to what are, de facto, forms of realism. This book has a decent though hardly outstanding bibliography.