cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain (Cambridge Studies in Archaeology)
eBook Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain (Cambridge Studies in Archaeology) ePub

eBook Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain (Cambridge Studies in Archaeology) ePub

by Howard Williams

  • ISBN: 0521142253
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Howard Williams
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1383 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1780 kb
  • Other: mobi doc txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 646

Description

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400-1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices.

Cambridge Core - British History Before 1066 - Death and Memory in. .Williams, Howard 2011 ‘Moralities of Dress and the Dress of the Dead in Early Medieval Europe’, in Hamilakis, . Pluciennik, M. & Tarlow, S. (ed.

Cambridge Core - British History Before 1066 - Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain - by Howard Williams. Williams, Howard 2011. Ashes to asses: an archaeological perspective on death and donkeys. Journal of Material Culture, Vol. 16, Issue. Moralities of Dress and the Dress of the Dead in Early Medieval Europe’, in Hamilakis, . Thinking through the Body: Archaeologies of Corporeality, New York: Kluwer/Plenum, pp. 71–84. Bentley, R. Krause, . Price, T. D. & Kaufmann, B. 2003.

Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain is an archaeological study of mnemonic elements in the funerary practices of Early Medieval Britain, written by the British archaeologist Howard Williams. The book was first published by Cambridge University Press as part of their series "Cambridge Studies in Archaeology" in 2006. The first chapter, "Death, Memory and Material Culture", serves as an introduction to Williams' approach

Howard M. R. Williams, FSA is a British archaeologist and academic. He is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester in England.

Howard M. Williams obtained a BSc from the University of Sheffield. He later attended the University of Reading where he received a MS and a PhD. degree. Williams has taught archaeology at Trinity College Carmarthen, Cardiff University and the University of Exeter.

An innovative application of theories of memory and material culture to an early historic society, this 2006 book uses the early medieval cemetery in Britain between 400–1100 AD as a rich and complex data set, addressing the commemorative functions of funerary ritual using archaeological remains as its evidence base.

Williams looks at burials in early medieval Britain as a whole package: not just a source of osteological information . Williams is a British archaeologist. He received his PhD in 2000 from the University of Reading for a thesis on Anglo-Saxon cremation burial.

Williams looks at burials in early medieval Britain as a whole package: not just a source of osteological information, but, as texts containing many meanings formed by the arrangement of objects and the body. Also coming into play is the siting of the grave in the landscape : the silhouette it forms against the sky, the view from the grave, even the very shape of the gr In this refreshing look at the whole picture, Williams builds on the old archeological maxim "the dead do not bury themselves".

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c.

Автор: Howard Williams Название: Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain Издательство: Cambridge . Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history.

Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

Highlighting that not all Early Medieval burials are in cemeteries, Williams looks to literaty evidence from land charters and Beowulf to theorise . Williams, Howard (2006). Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Highlighting that not all Early Medieval burials are in cemeteries, Williams looks to literaty evidence from land charters and Beowulf to theorise mortuary landscapes. ISBN 978-0-521-14225-0.

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400-1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.