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eBook On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History ePub

eBook On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History ePub

by John Patrick Diggins

  • ISBN: 0300082371
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: John Patrick Diggins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (August 11, 2000)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1498 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1427 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 158

Description

Includes bibliographical references (p. -321) and index. John Patrick Diggins offers a reassessment of American history, emphasizing the foundational role of Abraham Lincoln's moral and political theory

Includes bibliographical references (p. John Patrick Diggins offers a reassessment of American history, emphasizing the foundational role of Abraham Lincoln's moral and political theory. Distressed by the divisive impact of modern identity politics, Diggins argues persuasively that in the central tenets of Lincoln's political faith - the redeeming value of labor and the rights to property and self-determination - we find the purest expression of the values that have united Americans and guided American history.

John Patrick Diggins argues that in the central tenets of Lincoln's political faith, we find the purest expression of. .

John Patrick Diggins argues that in the central tenets of Lincoln's political faith, we find the purest expression of the values that have guided American history. Originally published in 2000, Professor John Diggins' book, "On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History", has been reissued in paperback.

Originally published in 2000, Professor John Diggins' book, "On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History", has been reissued in paperback. The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History

Redirected from John Diggins). John Patrick Diggins (April 1, 1935 – January 28, 2009) was an American professor of history at the City University of New York Graduate Center, the author of more than.

Redirected from John Diggins). John Patrick Diggins (April 1, 1935 – January 28, 2009) was an American professor of history at the City University of New York Graduate Center, the author of more than a dozen books on widely varied subjects in American intellectual history. Diggins was born in San Francisco on April 1, 1935, the son of an Irish immigrant.

In this provocative book, John Patrick Diggins, hailed by Alan Ryan in the New York Times as one . A reassessment of American history, emphasizing the foundational role of Abraham Lincoln's moral and political theory.

In this provocative book, John Patrick Diggins, hailed by Alan Ryan in the New York Times as one of the liveliest and most interesting of contemporary intellectual. John Patrick Diggins argues that in the central tenets of Lincoln's political faith, we find the purest expression of the values that have guided American history.

John Patrick Diggins is one of the most prolific scholars of United States intellectual history of his generation

John Patrick Diggins is one of the most prolific scholars of United States intellectual history of his generation. He is also one of the more contentious.

Similar books and articles. The Lincoln Persuasion Remaking American Liberalism

Similar books and articles. The Lincoln Persuasion Remaking American Liberalism. Abraham Lincoln at the Climax of the Great Lincoln-Douglas Joint Debate in Galesburg, Illinois Delivered at Galesburg, Illinois, on the 6th Day of October, 1928, on the 70th Anniversary of the Lincoln-Douglas Debate, From a Platform Erected on the Spot. Jyotirmaya Tripathy, Sura Prasad Rath & William D. Pederson (ed. - 2010 - Pencraft International.

6Daniel Mclnerney, The Fortunate Heirs of Freedom: Abolition and Republican Thought (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press), 1. 7Michael Sandel, Democracy's Discontent (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998), 177-81. This content downloaded from 16. 34. 62 on Wed, 15 Jan 2014 02:31:11 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions.

In this book, John Patrick Diggins, hailed by Alan Ryan in the New York Times, offers a sweeping reassessment of American history, emphasizing the foundational role of Abraham Lincoln’s moral and political theory. Distressed by the divisive impact of modern identity politics, Diggins argues persuasively that in the central tenets of Lincoln’s political faith-the redeeming value of labor and the rights to property and e find the purest expression of the values that have united Americans and guided American history.

John Patrick Diggins is an intellectual and political historian whose books range widely through American history to.

John Patrick Diggins is an intellectual and political historian whose books range widely through American history to explain patterns of thought and behavior from the nation's founding to the present da.

Contests the validity of Marxist and poststructuralist theory in a review of the life and legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

Comments

Mave Mave
I first came across the late John Patrick Diggins by reading The Portable John Adams (Penguin Classics) It was obvious this person had many compelling ideas about Adams and the founding of this nation.

This book is about Lincoln, but not in a typical biographical sense, but with much more complexities involving Lincoln's thoughts, and references to other historians and philosophers, past and present, on this continent and from Europe. John Locke and his political philosophy is referred to on many pages, and we are referred to Tocqueville, Max Weber, Reinhold Niebuhr, the ever voluminous and inconsequential Cornel West, and many more.

Diggins discusses at length the importance of the Declaration of Independence and its relevance to Lincoln's political thinking versus the U.S. Constitution, which is more the business end of the pair, while the Declaration holds forth the promise of greatness of a nation that could conceive of liberty and justice for all. And, while the Declaration is one of the most noble documents written, it was flawed from the beginning by the failure to address the elephant in the room in Philadelphia; that a group of people who claim to be oppressed by the tyranny of a monarchy would not dare even discuss their own enslavement of human beings.

This is not an "easy" read by any means. Each page is loaded with thoughts that force you to ponder what the author has just said. You can only read it in small sections; to consume it quickly will leave you without recollection of 90 per cent of what you read, but there is something here for about anyone. As a Vietnam veteran, I was struck by the author's statement that the misguided Vietnam War left us no Gettysburg Address. It is unfortunate, but the politicians of today are not statesmen and most are more concerned with poll results and fund raising than to be troubled as to what we are and want to be as a nation; and I am sure this work is much too complex for the average student of history. Too many Americans have the attention span of a cocker spaniel and are much more interested in Thomas Jefferson laying with Sally Hemings.

But, Diggins does pose a lot of interesting questions and while this book is not by any means, a conventional bio of the great man, it is worth your time and the space on your bookshelf.
Ynneig Ynneig
Originally published in 2000, Professor John Diggins' book, "On Hallowed Ground: Abraham Lincoln and the Foundations of American History", has been reissued in paperback. I read and reviewed this book here on Amazon in 2001, but returned to think about the book upon reading Gordon Wood's review, titled "History as Cultural Criticism", of Diggins' book. Wood's review is available in his book, "The Purpose of the Past." The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History

Wood criticizes Diggins for writing cultural criticism under the guise of history. Wood also showed sympathy for Diggins' endeavor and described him as "a prolific and powerful critic and one of our most distinguished public intellectuals." (p 276) I revisited my review of Diggins to see how my thoughts compared with Wood's. After doing so, and seeing that Diggins' book had been reissued, I thought it worthwhile to reprint my original review here, under the reissued title. Thus, the remainder of this review consists of my Amazon review of 2001 of the original edition of Diggins' study.

Professor John Diggins's study is part history, part philosophy, and part polemic. The title of the book suggests a study of Abraham Lincoln and his impact on American values. The exploration of this subject alone is a formidable task, but Professor Diggins adds to it with his discussions of the American Revolution, the political philosophy of Locke, the observations on American character of de Tocqueville, the political economic theorizing of Veblen and Weber, the studies of American liberalism by Louis Hartz, and much more.
Professor Diggins argues against those scholars who see Lincoln exclusively as a pragmatic policitican and claims that our Sixteenth President sought a foundational, non-relativistic source for our political values in the principle that all men are created equal, and in the right of all to work and to strive to own property and to better themselves. Lincolns' philosophy, Diggins claims, had its roots in the Declaration of Independence and in Lockean ideas. His reading of Lincoln is supported by discussions of numberous speeches and writings, most of which can be found in the wonderful two-volume Library of America edition of Lincoln's writings.

The broad targets of Professor Diggins's book are philosophical relativists. Much of the book, however, is devoted to a polemic against modern multiculturalism and deconstruction. Lincoln, the philosophy of consensus (one shared broadly by Americans irrespective of their interest group, race, sex, status), and the value of work motivated by material self-interest are defended as an integral part of the American vision, striven for by all and, paradoxically, expanding the scope of our liberties.

The book suffers, I think, from being overly ambitious and from its structure. The arguments are unduly repetitive and this, I think, hinders Professor Diggins from developing them with the depth they deserve. The book strays too far from Lincoln. While much of the discussion of other figures in the book is valuable and illuminating, particularly the discussion of Professor Hartz and of the Federalists, it moves too far from Lincoln or, more precisely, it gives the book a loose free-wheeling character with ideas suggested rather than sufficiently developed. Similarly, Professor Diggins's criticism of multiculturalism, with which I greatly sympathize, is not well integrated with the rest of the book. It is simply too much to do a political polemic, a study of Lincoln, and a treatment of American intellectual history in a single, relatively short volume.

These quibbles to one side, the work is well worth reading. It explores our American heritage, challenges prevailing orthodoxies and offers much for further study and reflection. This is a worthwhile exploration of important issues in the nature of our precious American experience.

Robin Friedman