cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History - Fiftieth Anniversary Edition
eBook This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History - Fiftieth Anniversary Edition ePub

eBook This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History - Fiftieth Anniversary Edition ePub

by T.R. Fehrenbach

  • ISBN: 1574882597
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: T.R. Fehrenbach
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Potomac Books Inc.; 50th Anniversary edition (May 2000)
  • Pages: 540
  • ePub book: 1737 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1900 kb
  • Other: txt doc lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 232

Description

Fehrenbach wrote This Kind of War about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. Although doesn’t mention his Korean War experiences anywhere in his book, Fehrenbach’s disillusionment with how the war was fought at all levels fairly drips from each page.

Fehrenbach wrote This Kind of War about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. His main criticism is that the United States was very much unprepared to fight a major land war in Asia – or anywhere else, for that matter.

This Kind of War. Author Biography. During World War II, . Fehrenbach served with the . Infantry and Engineers as Platoon Sergeant with the 3189th Engineer Battalion.

Mobile version (beta). Download (epub, 798 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

This Kind of War book.

This Kind of War originally appeared in 1963 with the subtitle of A Study in Unpreparedness and was republished in. .Fehrenbach’s framework is tragic.

Although This Kind of War starts with a quotation from Sun Tzu, Fehrenbach adopts a Clausewitzian approach. The United States was unprepared to fight a limited war halfway around the world and when it intervened it overreached before finally winning partial victory and painful wisdom.

This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History.

Rethinking the Korean War: A New Diplomatic and Strategic History. Princeton U. Press, 2002. Halberstam, David (2007), The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, New York, NY: Hyperion Books, ISBN 1401300529. Gunacgun, Ilker (2011), Sakin Sabahlar Ülkesi, Istanbul, Turkey: Sokak Kitapları Yayınları, ISBN 9789944205429.

Updated with maps, photographs, and battlefield diagrams, this special fiftieth anniversary edition of the classic history of the Korean War is a dramatic and hard-hitting account of the conflict written from the perspective of those who fought it. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of the small-unit commanders and their troops. Unlike any other work on the Korean War, it provides both a clear panoramic overview and a sharply drawn "you were there" account of American troops in fierce combat against the North Korean and Chinese communist invaders. As Americans and North Koreans continue to face each other across the 38th Parallel, This Kind of War commemorates the past and offers vital lessons for the future.

Comments

zmejka zmejka
Before this year, I knew very little about the Korean War. Now I know a lot more about what is called “the forgotten war,” thanks to two books on the subject that I’ve read over the last two months. Earlier this week, I finished “This Kind of War: The Classic Military History of the Korean War” by T.R. Fehrenbach.

Fehrenbach tells his story primarily through the perspective of the individual soldiers who fought on the front lines of the war. He describes the living hell of some of the great battles of the war, including Seoul, Osan, Inchon, Imjin River, Chosin (Changjin) Reservoir, Bloody and Heartbreak Ridges, Pork Chop Hill, and others.

Fehrenbach wrote “This Kind of War” about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. Although doesn’t mention his Korean War experiences anywhere in his book, Fehrenbach’s disillusionment with how the war was fought at all levels fairly drips from each page. His main criticism is that the United States was very much unprepared to fight a major land war in Asia – or anywhere else, for that matter. The Truman Administration had spent the five years after the end of World War II gutting defense budgets, reducing military personnel levels, and depriving the armed forces of the essential equipment they needed in order to win. Soldiers – especially those stationed in Japan, the ones who would end up being sent to Korea – had lost their fighting edge due to inadequate training and soft living.

Fehrenbach brings to life many of the most famous historical events of the war, including President Harry Truman’s firing of General Douglas MacArthur, the death of General Walton Walker in a motor vehicle accident, and – most interestingly – the plight of prisoners of war (POWs) on both sides. Relying on interviews with American POWs who survived captivity, Fehrenbach paints a devastating picture of the sub-human conditions these soldiers were forced to endure. The author also gives a detailed account of the uprising in the United Nations POW camp on Koje-do Island, and how that rebellion by North Korean and Chinese prisoners was suppressed.

“This Kind of War” is an excellent account of the Korean War. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and I learned a great deal from it. Highly recommended.
Rit Rit
As a military history of the mid-cold war era, it is a well-written and concise history of Western (mostly American) military action in Asia. The intricacies of coupling warfare and diplomacy in Korea is heart-breaking. The forfeiture of American lives for ‘status quo ante’ is appalling.

Which brings me to my personal point: did no one who got us into Viet Nam read this book? Was nothing taught in Military Colleges about what happened? Where were the Westmoreland’s at this time? The McNamara’s? The Kennedy’s?

A land war in Asia with tenuous supply lines from the north, where people brought all equipment south by hand, foot, truck. Landscape not conducive to large scale mobilizations. An enemy that can live on 3 rice balls a day, survive hostile climates, with a feeling of righteousness.

Am I describing Korea or Viet Nam?

Sorry for the tirade. Read the book.
Dilkree Dilkree
The book still deserves five stars based purely on content. It's a style of history writing that may strike many 21st Century Americans as preachy, grandfatherly, and stuffy. But Fehrenbach makes a decent case for his arguments and he's a first-rate writer, and his prose is quite lively. So I have no problem recommending the book, and do so with special enthusiasm either for aspiring young warriors (especially aspiring military officers) or for those interested in the history of history-writing (great insights into American thought in 1962, on the cusp of our increasing involvement in the Vietnam War).

As of January 2015, however, the Kindle e-book version of this book is HORRIBLY FORMATTED. If I had the ability to rate this book's format apart from its content, I'd give it only one star. Almost every page has formatting errors, and while they're all distracting (and eventually very annoying), some of them are impenetrably confusing, substantively obscuring the author's meaning. I don't know whether the blame is Amazon's or the publisher's -- my guess is the latter -- but whoever was responsible for proofreading the conversion of this e-book should perhaps be sentenced to at least a choice between being fired and spending a weekend in a North Korean prison camp.
Rainpick Rainpick
I have not read it in many years. I bought this copy to replace one I gifted to a friend. It is a good read for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics of USA and United Nations involvement in world affairs. It also provides some insight into the disastrous consequences for the those who serve their country. Throwing troops in summer uniform into lethal winder conditions, with inadequate weapons and supplies is inexcusable. As a veteran of the Vietnam conflict I am happy to say that although we did not learn all the lessons of Korea, we did, at least, take much better care of our troops.