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eBook Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs: The Best 21st Century Short Stories from Japan ePub

eBook Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs: The Best 21st Century Short Stories from Japan ePub

by Helen Mitsios,Pico Iyer

  • ISBN: 0887277926
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Helen Mitsios,Pico Iyer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cheng & Tsui; 1st Edition edition (February 25, 2011)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1202 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1193 kb
  • Other: txt docx azw mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 550

Description

This book was published in 2011 and contained 13 stories by as many writers. They ranged in age from Noboru Tsujihara (1945-) to Hitomi Kanehara (1983-)

She has recently co-authored the memoir Waltzing with the Enemy: A Mother and Daughter Confront the Aftermath of the Holocaust. This book was published in 2011 and contained 13 stories by as many writers. They ranged in age from Noboru Tsujihara (1945-) to Hitomi Kanehara (1983-). One piece was published in 1998, it appears the rest were from the first decade of the 21st century. Prominent authors included Haruki Murakami, Natsuo Kirino, Yoko Tawada, Masahiko Shimada and Yoko Ogawa.

Start by marking Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs: The .

Start by marking Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs: The Best 21st Century Short Stories from Japan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. She has recently co-authored the memoir Waltzing with the Enemy: A Mother and Daughter Confront the Aftermath of the Holocaust.

In 1991 the gods of publishing granted fiction lovers a boon: two anthologies of newly translated contemporary Japanese fiction-Alfred Birnbaum’s Monkey Brain Sushi and Helen Mitsios’s New Japanese Voices. Upon reading these stories, two things struck me. First, their exceptional level of craft. As short fiction, they are as well wrought as any I’ve read in years.

This collection of short stories features the most up-to-date and exciting writing from the most popular and finest . Mitsios’s anthology takes the best of Japanese contemporary issues and writers today and brings them to English readers.

This collection of short stories features the most up-to-date and exciting writing from the most popular and finest award-winning authors in Japan today. Be it children of novelists or yes, talking frogs, 'Digital Geishas' is good fodder for the reading inclined. Like the Cheng and Tsui’s other Asian works, the collection does not disappoint.

Hoshino’s story The No Fathers Club centers around a small group of people who are, in the absence of purpose and two-parent homes, looking for a connection.

Helen Mitsios, ed. Pico Iyer, intro. As short fiction, they are as well wrought as any I've read in years. Each of the young men and women who, in Tomoyuki Hoshino's story, form "The No Fathers Club" ("We admitted only those whose fathers truly didn't exist in this world. Second, their despair. ) is not merely filling a family void: they're trying to create a self.

Foreword by Pico Iyer. Literature/Asian Studies. This collection of short stories features the most up-to-date and exciting writing from the most popular and celebrated authors in Japan today. The best 21ST century short stories from japan. With a foreword by Pico Iyer. These wildly imaginative and boundary-bursting stories reveal fascinating and unexpected personal responses to the changes raging through today’s Japan.

April 5, 2013 ·. Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs: The Best 21st Century Stories from Japan, Helen Mitsios, ed. World Literature Today.

it – World Literature Forum Robert Sheppard’s thriller novel, Spiritus Mundi, is an unforgettable read and epic journey bringing to life the s. Spiritus Mundi, Novel by Robert Sheppard. April 5, 2013 ·.

Pico Iyer in his very elegant and erudite introduction to Digital Gieshas and Talking Frogs Best 21th Century Japanese Short Stories sees the stories as evolving from the destruction . Super-frog saves Tokyo, Haruki Murakami. The diary of a mummy, Masahiko Shimada.

Pico Iyer in his very elegant and erudite introduction to Digital Gieshas and Talking Frogs Best 21th Century Japanese Short Stories sees the stories as evolving from the destruction of the authority of Japanese father figures, from the Emperor who is a false god to the grandfathers who came home defeated, to the youths raised with no foundation of values. Samurais were just figures in magna and cartoons, women in Geisha attire worked at car shows. The female novelist, Maki Kashimada.

com and UrimPublications.

This collection of short stories features the most up-to-date and exciting writing from the most popular and celebrated authors in Japan today. These wildly imaginative and boundary-bursting stories reveal fascinating and unexpected personal responses to the changes raging through today's Japan. Along with some of the world's most renowned Japanese authors, Digital Geishas and Talking Frogs includes many writers making their English-language debut.

Comments

Meztisho Meztisho
Very good. Stories are subtle and interesting but remember these are on the literary side. This is not popular fiction, so don't get it thinking you are getting detective stories or mainstream schlocky stuff.

I knew what I was getting and liked it. subtle and powerful for the most part.
Kiaile Kiaile
I chose this rating as i felt the strong connection with each story, i felt the editor took such time to reach out to its readers, this book was such a masterpiece in short stories, and to not be much of a strong reader, this is a book that ill ready for life. its a book that takes the mind by storm, the material connects Japanese culture as well as the day to day happenings of a new yorker.
Golden freddi Golden freddi
This is a very interesting read. I picked it up as I was travelling through Japan. It contains some well written stories and gives an insight into the Japanese society and psyche.I especially like the sense of black humour in some stories, as well as some profound stories of sadness.
Rrinel Rrinel
Good read!! My professor is the editor!!
Bynelad Bynelad
This book was published in 2011 and contained 13 stories by as many writers. They ranged in age from Noboru Tsujihara (1945-) to Hitomi Kanehara (1983-). One piece was published in 1998, it appears the rest were from the first decade of the 21st century. Prominent authors included Haruki Murakami, Natsuo Kirino, Yoko Tawada, Masahiko Shimada and Yoko Ogawa. Among the missing: Ryu Murakami, Hiromi Kawakami and Banana Yoshimoto.

For this reader, the best works by far were by Kirino ("The Floating Forest") and Shimada ("The Diary of a Mummy"). The first described well the conflicted history of a woman who was the daughter and stepdaughter of famous writers -- there was emotion in this piece, unlike many of the others. The second followed the discovery of a suicide and his diary, which convincingly depicted his changing moods after he stopped eating.

Regrettably, most of the other selections made less of an impression. "Ikebukuro West Gate Park" by Ira Ishida and "Deliliah" by Kanehara had lots of action, but it was contrived in the former and in the latter it was sensationalistic to the point of parody. Others alternated between cryptic, colorless vignettes -- lacking in emotion or a strong point of view -- and contrived tales of fantasy with no point that could be grasped. Why did a "super-frog" need a human companion to cheer it on while battling a large worm beneath Tokyo? Why did Nietzsche, Tolstoy, Conrad, Hemingway, and Dostoevsky need to be name-dropped in the story? Japanese writers from earlier decades -- Kobo Abe, Kenji Nakagami -- blended fantasy and reality in more mature, convincing ways.

Other anthologies of Japanese fiction since the year 2000 include Inside and Other Short Fiction (2006) and The Book of Tokyo: A City in Short Fiction (2015). The first contained convincing works by Yuzuki Muroi and Tamaki Daido, written with gritty realism. The latter had worthwhile pieces by Osamu Hashimoto, Mitsuyo Kakuta and Shuichi Yoshida on love, isolation and the passing of time.

The editor of Digital Geishas has published an earlier collection of Japanese prose, mostly from the 1980s -- New Japanese Voices (1991). For this reader, it resembled the present collection: Big names, but regrettably there weren't enough strong stories.
Unsoo Unsoo
This is a great collection, including offerings from Natsuo Kirino, Haruki Murakami, Yoko Ogawa and Hitomi Kanehara. It has also introduced me to some new Japanese writers whom I really enjoyed - but sadly, they seem to have nothing available in English translation at present (Boo!). As with all such collections, there are a couple of damp squibs, but absent those - and some slightly strange editing/proofreading - this would have been a five-star outing.
Mora Mora
Finally, a new collection of Japan's up-to-the-minute best writers. Digital Geishas opens a window into the minds of the Japanese people, from a peek into the lives of Tokyo's underground youth and cheating spouses to epic battles fought on dreamscapes and unlikely transformations. This compilation provides a unique perspective on the literary world in Japan. So much can be seen by the way the characters navigate themselves through whatever life throws their way; how they struggle with inner demons, cope with loss, and how, despite everything, they live each day with passion. I did some digging and found that the editor of this book is the same person who discovered Banana Yoshimoto and published her in English for the first time. The story "Ikebukuro West Gate Park" was my favorite, but all the stories in this collection are wonderful!
These stories are awesome. Each one is a perfect jewel. "My Slighly Crooked Brooch" blew me away. I've never read a story like it before. And I loved "The No-Father's Club" about a group of kids who pretend their fathers still live with them even though their parents got divorced. This really is the best short story collection and the stories have the same magic for me that anime does.