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eBook The Racketeer's Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) ePub

eBook The Racketeer's Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) ePub

by Andrew Wender Cohen

  • ISBN: 0521124506
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Andrew Wender Cohen
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (December 10, 2009)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1757 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1594 kb
  • Other: lrf docx rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 495

Description

The Racketeer's Progress is an original, engaging study that succeeds in describing Chicago's craft economy and in challenging historians to rethink their interpretations of ury political economy. Salzmann, University of Illinois at Chicago.

The Racketeer's Progress is an original, engaging study that succeeds in describing Chicago's craft economy and in challenging historians to rethink their interpretations of ury political economy. A provocative study of law and its social context, this work explores the contingent origins of the modern American economy.

The Racketeer's Progress book. Start by marking The Racketeer's Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It shows how craftsmen - teamsters, barbers, musicians, and others - violently governed commerce in Chicago through pickets, assaults, and bombings.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Part of the Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society Series). A provocative study of law and its social context, this work explores the contingent origins of the modern American economy

Part of the Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society Series). by Andrew Wender Cohen. These tradesmen forcefully contested the power of national corporations in their city.

ByCohenAndrew Wender. The Skyscraper and the City: The Woolworth Building and the Making of Modern New York. Unmasking the State: Making Guinea Modern. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2013. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008, xii + 399 pp.

The Racketeer's Progress explores the contested and contingent origins of the modern American ecomy by examining the violent . Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society.

The Racketeer's Progress explores the contested and contingent origins of the modern American ecomy by examining the violent resistance to its development. It explains how carpenters, teamsters, barbers, musicians and others organised to thwart ambitious national corporations. Unions and associations governed commerce through pickets, assaults and bombings. Scholars often igre this defiance, painting modernisation as a consensual process and presenting craftsmen as reactionary, corrupt and criminal. Reid, Joseph . 2005. The Racketeer's Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900†1940. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:02:p:591-593 30.

Andrew Wender Cohen, The Racketeer’s Progress: Chicago and the .

Andrew Wender Cohen, The Racketeer’s Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. In particular, Cohen discusses the Building Trades Lockout of 1900 and the Teamsters’ Strike of 1905, both of which turned violent. It was not a struggle against progress, for anything that would reduce the labor required to complete an existing job at the existing wage was welcome. Nor was it a struggle against change, for there was a willingness to accept change that could be controlled.

Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940.

Cohen, Andrew Wender. The Racketeer's Progress: Chicago and the Struggle for the Modern American Economy, 1900-1940. 333 pp. Cooley, Will, "'Stones Run It': Taking Back Control of Organized Crime in Chicago, 1940–1975," Journal of Urban History, 37 (Nov. 2011), 933–51.

A provocative study of law and its social context, this work explores the contingent origins of the modern American economy. It shows how craftsmen - teamsters, barbers, musicians, and others - violently governed commerce in Chicago through pickets, assaults, and bombings. These tradesmen forcefully contested the power of national corporations in their city. Their resistance shaped American law, heavily influencing the New Deal and federal criminal statutes. This book thus shows that American industrial policy resulted not from a "search for order," but from a brutal struggle for control.

Comments

romrom romrom
I bought this book used and I got it as a brand new one. It's in perfect conditions and I got it on time.
Haven't finished reading it yet. I'm liking it, the references are good and the evidences and fact to support the argument too.
Nalmetus Nalmetus
Finally, a definitive treatise on the subject. A must read. Kudos to Professor Cohen.