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eBook Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy (Volume 5) ePub

eBook Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy (Volume 5) ePub

by Maurice Cranston,Justus Hartnack

  • ISBN: 041538284X
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Maurice Cranston,Justus Hartnack
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge (December 22, 2005)
  • Pages: 140
  • ePub book: 1458 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1812 kb
  • Other: lrf txt lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 835

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Ships from and sold by powells chicago.

Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy book. Hartnack manages to give a clear and precise description of both the young and mature Wittgenstein's philosophy. First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint. The description of Wittgenstein's effect on the modern philosophy goes a bit off track, and lacks the clearness the previous chapters provided.

Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy. Translated by Maurice Cranston. Justus Hartnack - 1965 - Routledge. Interpretations of Wittgenstein. Anfinn Stigen - 1962 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 5 (1-4):167-175. New York University Press, 1965. Wittgenstein: A Very Short Introduction. A. C. Grayling - 1988 - Oxford University Press.

JUSTUS HARTNACK, Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy (trans: Maurice Cranston, New York: Anchor . Hartnack is also famous for his book Philosophical Problems.

JUSTUS HARTNACK, Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy (trans: Maurice Cranston, New York: Anchor Books, 1965) pp. (x+142). The book Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy, written by Professor Justus Hartnack, was first published in Danish. The book Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy deals with the philosophy of the most famous contemporary philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. This book covers over one hundred and forty two pages. It begins with a preface by the author. This book, having five chapters, is the interpretation of Wittgenstein’s philosophical works.

By Justus Hartnack, Maurice Cranston. Wittgenstein and Modern Philosophy. By Justus Hartnack, Maurice Cranston. No one has contributed more to this new awareness than Ludwig Wittgenstein, who died in 1951.

Volume 5, Issue 1. June 1966, pp. 101-102.

First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company. Rate it . You Rated it .

com: WITTGENSTEIN AND MODERN PHILOSOPHY: 4 x 7 in. Paper wraps. Andre Strong Bookseller and Red Gap Books have two shops in Blue Hill, on the coast of Maine. Condition is VERY GOOD ; mild edge wear, covers rubbed. Binding tight and text unmarked. One is a used book shop with a wide selection of subject for big readers, and the other is Red Gap Rare, an elegant space with a large, ever- changing collection of books for collectors. The entire stock of Red Gap rare is listed on abebooks. Visit Seller's Storefront. Terms of Sale: All subject to prior sale. Maine residents pay 5% sales tax. by. Hartnack, Justus. Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 1889-1951. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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Justus Hartnack is a Danish philosopher, who has written other books such as An Introduction to Hegel's Logic,Language and Philosophy,Kant's Theory of Knowledge,Philosophical Problems,History of Philosophy, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1962 book, “Twentieth-century philosophy, more than that of any other period, has become deeply and sharply conscious of the connection between philosophical problems and language. No one has contributed more to this new awareness than Ludwig Wittgenstein… To understand the connection between philosophy and language is to understand Wittgenstein. And precisely because Wittgenstein holds the key to modern philosophical activity, there is an obvious need for and exposition of his thought. But … what Wittgenstein says in his very personal and often aphoristic way cannot simply be restated; it must be interpreted, and interpretations, as often as not, are controversial… In the pages which follow, I have tried to give a general survey of Wittgenstein’s thought… and also to give some account of the influence which … [his] books have exercised. My essay is thus to some extent an account of what is not altogether correctly known as ‘analytical philosophy.’”

He points out of Wittgenstein as a teacher, “Admission to his lectures was always restricted; he would receive only those students who would undertake to attend regularly for at least one term. He insisted that his lectures were not for tourists, but only for students who took philosophy seriously and would apply themselves to the study of its problems with something like his own devotion. There were never more than fifteen students at his lectures, but most of the men who heard them were marked by them indelibly.” (Pg. 5)

He comments on the Tractatus, “To claim that language consists only of propositions is to put a radical limitation on what language can do, and Wittgenstein came in his later work to reject this limitation. Even so, such a limitation is bound to follow from the analysis of language as a picture of facts. Another point worth noting is that one elementary proposition cannot contradict another elementary proposition. Unfortunately Wittgenstein provides no actual example of an elementary proposition. One of the reasons for this may be that no sentence taken from ordinary language satisfies the demands that must be met for it to qualify as an elementary proposition.” (Pg. 20)

He notes, “In the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein touches on many different philosophical problems. One leads to another, or is examined in the light of another, and, just as often, examined in the light of a third problem. These in turn are examined in the light of further problems. Thus one is taken by a series of crisscross journeys through an ever wider field of thought, an adventure which yields what Wittgenstein calls a collection of landscape sketches, sketches that in the end combine to provide an overall panorama of the whole terrain. He compares his own book to an album.” (Pg. 100)

This book was written before the “flood” of additional writings of Wittgenstein that have been published in recent years; but as a brief survey and analysis of the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations, this book serves its introductory purpose admirably.
Wire Wire
Justus Hartnack is a Danish philosopher, who has written other books such as An Introduction to Hegel's Logic,Language and Philosophy,Kant's Theory of Knowledge,Philosophical Problems,History of Philosophy, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1962 book, “Twentieth-century philosophy, more than that of any other period, has become deeply and sharply conscious of the connection between philosophical problems and language. No one has contributed more to this new awareness than Ludwig Wittgenstein… To understand the connection between philosophy and language is to understand Wittgenstein. And precisely because Wittgenstein holds the key to modern philosophical activity, there is an obvious need for and exposition of his thought. But … what Wittgenstein says in his very personal and often aphoristic way cannot simply be restated; it must be interpreted, and interpretations, as often as not, are controversial… In the pages which follow, I have tried to give a general survey of Wittgenstein’s thought… and also to give some account of the influence which … [his] books have exercised. My essay is thus to some extent an account of what is not altogether correctly known as ‘analytical philosophy.’”

He points out of Wittgenstein as a teacher, “Admission to his lectures was always restricted; he would receive only those students who would undertake to attend regularly for at least one term. He insisted that his lectures were not for tourists, but only for students who took philosophy seriously and would apply themselves to the study of its problems with something like his own devotion. There were never more than fifteen students at his lectures, but most of the men who heard them were marked by them indelibly.” (Pg. 5)

He comments on the Tractatus, “To claim that language consists only of propositions is to put a radical limitation on what language can do, and Wittgenstein came in his later work to reject this limitation. Even so, such a limitation is bound to follow from the analysis of language as a picture of facts. Another point worth noting is that one elementary proposition cannot contradict another elementary proposition. Unfortunately Wittgenstein provides no actual example of an elementary proposition. One of the reasons for this may be that no sentence taken from ordinary language satisfies the demands that must be met for it to qualify as an elementary proposition.” (Pg. 20)

He notes, “In the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein touches on many different philosophical problems. One leads to another, or is examined in the light of another, and, just as often, examined in the light of a third problem. These in turn are examined in the light of further problems. Thus one is taken by a series of crisscross journeys through an ever wider field of thought, an adventure which yields what Wittgenstein calls a collection of landscape sketches, sketches that in the end combine to provide an overall panorama of the whole terrain. He compares his own book to an album.” (Pg. 100)

This book was written before the “flood” of additional writings of Wittgenstein that have been published in recent years; but as a brief survey and analysis of the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations, this book serves its introductory purpose admirably.