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eBook HASIDIC PRAYER (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization) ePub

eBook HASIDIC PRAYER (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization) ePub

by Louis Jacobs

  • ISBN: 0805206043
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Louis Jacobs
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Schocken (1978)
  • ePub book: 1923 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1331 kb
  • Other: azw lit docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 503

Description

This is a reprint of Louis Jacobs' 1972 classic on the history and techniques of Hasidic prayer.

This is a reprint of Louis Jacobs' 1972 classic on the history and techniques of Hasidic prayer. It's an academic study, not a how-to book, but it does contain quite a bit of material translated from firsthand Hasidic sources, about how the Rebbes and their followers approached their daily prayers. As such, it is of great value to anyone interested in the inner dynamics of prayer. Both Jews and non-Jews will find gems of wisdom in this book. I am very glad to see it back in print.

What is Hasidic Judaism? A Brief History of the Movement - Продолжительность: 5:39 .

Founded by Louis Littman in memory of his father to explore, explain, and perpetuate the Jewish heritage, the Littman . At the same time the Library entered the field of digital publishing with the launch of its first e-books: The Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization

Founded by Louis Littman in memory of his father to explore, explain, and perpetuate the Jewish heritage, the Littman Library of Jewish Civilization published its first book in 1965. It has gone on to publish many highly regarded titles and has established a reputation as one of the world’s leading publishers in the field. At the same time the Library entered the field of digital publishing with the launch of its first e-books: The Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization. Following the initial 90 titles, all Littman books will eventually be included in the programme.

Etymologically, the term, "hasid" is a title used for various pious individuals and by various Jewish groups since Biblical times, and an earlier movement, the . Hasidic Prayer, Louis Jacobs, Littman Library of Jewish Civilization. a b c Freeman, Tzvi.

Etymologically, the term, "hasid" is a title used for various pious individuals and by various Jewish groups since Biblical times, and an earlier movement, the Hasidei Ashkenaz of medieval Germany was also called by this name Contents. Development of Hasidic schools of thought.

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Hasidic Prayer (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization). 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Hasidic Prayer (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization) from your list? Hasidic Prayer (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization).

JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary . Books in JSTOR from Littman Library of Jewish Civilization. The Book of Tahkemoni: Jewish Tales from Medieval Spain.

JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources. British Jewry and the Holocaust: With a New Introduction. Hasidism and Politics: The Kingdom of Poland, 1815-1864.

Louis Jacobs, founding rabbi of the New London Synagogue, was a. .

Louis Jacobs, founding rabbi of the New London Synagogue, was a renowned scholar with an international reputation as a lecturer.

Published November 1st 1993 by Littman Library of Jewish Civilization in Association with Liverpool University Press (first published January 1st 1972). Hasidic Prayer (The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization). 1874774188 (ISBN13: 9781874774181).

But the inner dynamics of Hasidic prayer are something far different and much more.

book by Louis Jacobs. But the inner dynamics of Hasidic prayer are something far different and much more sublime. The key word is "kavannah," or focused attention, which transforms the seemingly "rote" repetitions into a mystical act of "elevating holy sparks. The words may be the same over and over, but the kavannah must be freshly-focused each time, because every prayer is a new offering to God.

Producer The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization. Pages 224. Year of production 2006.

Book by Jacobs, Louis

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This is a reprint of Louis Jacobs' 1972 classic on the history and techniques of Hasidic prayer. It's an academic study, not a how-to book, but it does contain quite a bit of material translated from firsthand Hasidic sources, about how the Rebbes and their followers approached their daily prayers. As such, it is of great value to anyone interested in the inner dynamics of prayer. Both Jews and non-Jews will find gems of wisdom in this book. I am very glad to see it back in print.
From the outside looking in, Hasidic prayer appears to be nothing more than endless repetition, chanted so quickly that the casual observer wonders how the worshipper can possibly focus on the meaning of the words. In a world where "slowly" is often associated with "more sincere," the rapid-fire pace of traditional Jewish liturgy is often misunderstood by outsiders as mere rote. But the inner dynamics of Hasidic prayer are something far different and much more sublime.
The key word is "kavannah," or focused attention, which transforms the seemingly "rote" repetitions into a mystical act of "elevating holy sparks." The words may be the same over and over, but the kavannah must be freshly-focused each time, because every prayer is a new offering to God. Properly done, Hasidic prayer "transcends syllables and sounds" to become an act of spiritual redemption.
This book was among the first in English to discuss the role of kavannah for the general public, and open up the various ways in which a Hasid puts his heart and soul into the recitation of the daily liturgy. Many Jews who read this book back in the 1970's saw, for the first time, the similarities between Hasidic prayer and forms of Eastern mantra meditation.
The author gives an overview of Hasidism and the various prayerbooks used by Hasidism, then discusses the role of gestures and melodies, various forms of contemplative prayer, ecstatic prayer, the elevation of "strange" or distractiing thoughts during prayer, prayers as inspiration, and the difference between the prayers of the Zaddik (Hasidic saint) and a ordinary Hasid, inluding the custom (still practiced today) of leaving a written prayer request (kvittel) on a Hasidic Rebbe's grave.
One technique that is not discussed here is the hisboddidus prayer of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (Bratzlav), where the individual goes into solitude and speaks spontaneously to God in his or her own words, as a spontaneous "stream of consciousness" prayer. Although Jacobs cites Rabbi Nachman several times on other topics, he does not seem to have picked up on the centrality of hisboddidus prayer in the practice of Breslov Hasidism. Either that, or he made a conscious decision to focus on prayer techniques related to the written prayerbook only. Still, given the time period in which this book was written, it was a fine achievment, and remains valuable today, as a good intro to the spiritual side of Hasidism.