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eBook Starting with Kant ePub

eBook Starting with Kant ePub

by Andrew Ward

  • ISBN: 1847061850
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Andrew Ward
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Continuum; 1 edition (August 30, 2012)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1450 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1651 kb
  • Other: azw txt lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 443

Description

Starting with Kant has been added to your Cart. But Ward bogs down after that. I kept reading, and realized it seemed like Ward just kept repeating the same assertions, a good indicator that I wasn't getting the subtle shades of difference in the points he was trying to make.

Starting with Kant has been added to your Cart. He moves too fast, and assumes too much. I can't enumerate all of his errors, but a big problem seems to me to be the lack of clear definitions of many terms. Ward seems think, as so many do, that somehow italicizing a new term is as good as defining it.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. It took just a little work, but this was the first time these concepts became clear to me. I was quite excited.

Immanuel Kant is undoubtedly one of the most important thinkers in the history of philosophy. He is also notoriously difficult for beginners to understand.

Starting with Kant - Starting with. Andrew Ward (author). Crucially the book situates Kant in relation to other philosophers of his period, and it shows how a number of his seminal ideas can be clearly understood through an appreciation of their opposing views

Starting with Kant - Starting with. Crucially the book situates Kant in relation to other philosophers of his period, and it shows how a number of his seminal ideas can be clearly understood through an appreciation of their opposing views. This is the ideal introduction for anyone coming to the work of this hugely important thinker for the first time.

Crucially the book situates Kant in relation to other philosophers of his .

Crucially the book situates Kant in relation to other philosophers of his period, and it shows how a number of his seminal ideas can be clearly understood through an appreciation of their opposing views. Ward is refreshingly sympathetic to Kant's philosophy, and he defends it against a range of criticisms.

Starting with Kant book.

Keith Ward, Cliff Bowman, Andrew Kakabadse.

ed, the book opens with a completely non-technical overview of thedevelopment of Kant's mature thought, resulting in a wide-ranging understandingof his famous and ground breaking Copernican revolution in metaphysics'. Thebook evaluates the basic framework of his metaphysical outlook, and sets outits implications for his theory of knowledge and moral philosophy.

Andrew S. Ward (born 1946) is an American writer of historical nonfiction. He lives in Seattle, Washington. Fits and Starts: The Premature Memoirs of Andrew Ward, Little-Brown (1978), ISBN 0-316-92199-8. The Blood Seed, McGraw-Hill (1987), ISBN 0-07-068133-3. Out Here: A Newcomer's Notes from the Great Northwest, Penguin (1992), ISBN 0-14-013054-3.

ImmanuelKant is undoubtedly one of the most important thinkers in the history ofphilosophy. He is also notoriously difficult for beginners to understand. Starting with Kant offers a genuinelyaccessible introduction to the metaphysics, theory of knowledge, and moralphilosophy of this hugely influential figure. It assumes no prior acquaintancewith his ideas. Thematicallystructured, the book opens with a completely non-technical overview of thedevelopment of Kant's mature thought, resulting in a wide-ranging understandingof his famous and ground breaking 'Copernican revolution in metaphysics'. Thebook evaluates the basic framework of his metaphysical outlook, and sets outits implications for his theory of knowledge and moral philosophy. Kant'sposition in these fields is related to other philosophers of his period so thata number of his seminal ideas can be clearly understood through an appreciationof their opposing views. This is the ideal introduction for anyone coming tothe work of his hugely important thinker for the first time.

Comments

Cia Cia
The section explaining Kant's ethics and argument for the proof of God were well-done, considering how difficult the source material is, and very accessible. However, I found the section on the "Critique of Pure Reason"'s transcedental deduction abtruse, though considering the source material and subject, this might be unavoidable. Also, the introduction and it's explanation of the basic ideas of Kant's metaphysics (such as posterior, analytic, and universal, etc.) was very readable.
Note: I have not read the "Critique of Pure Reason," only "Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals" and "Critique of Practical Reason."
Clandratha Clandratha
I've been seeking to understand Kant for years. With no proper background, a person won't get past the 2nd word of his original works. But so many of the supplementary materials by other authors end up being just as obscure as the original.

But I always buy a new guidebook when I see it. It's an addiction. I had high hopes for this one, with the back cover proclaiming "assumes no prior acquaintance with his ideas" and "opens with a completely non-technical overview of the development of Kant's mature thought" and "This is the ideal introduction for anyone coming to the work of this hugely important thinker for the first time".

Maybe Ward was exceptionally clear at the beginning, or maybe I've just been trying so long that something finally clicked, but I found the first section (explaining the problem Kant is trying to solve and defining the central terms, "appearances", "things in themselves", "inner and outer sensible intuitions", "a priori analytic", "a posteriori synthetic", and "a priori synthetic") to be quite clear. It took just a little work, but this was the first time these concepts became clear to me. I was quite excited.

But Ward bogs down after that. I kept reading, and realized it seemed like Ward just kept repeating the same assertions, a good indicator that I wasn't getting the subtle shades of difference in the points he was trying to make. He moves too fast, and assumes too much. I can't enumerate all of his errors, but a big problem seems to me to be the lack of clear definitions of many terms. Ward seems think, as so many do, that somehow italicizing a new term is as good as defining it. (A list of undefined or under-defined terms in the first 30 pages: predicate, intuition, inductive, comparative, manifold, understanding.) And there is no glossary or index. (I do own three dictionaries of philosophy, not to mention an internet, but it's nice, especially in an introductory work, when an author lets you know what *they* mean by a difficult term in that exact instance. I find turning to a dictionary from a text is often less than enlightening.)

So this one's going on the pile, maybe to be reviewed again someday after some other author gives me further insight. But it sure seems like no one who understands Kant also understand the average person's mind. It seems there is no one who can bridge those two worlds, as if understanding Kant turns you into a different species. I long for a David Deutsch or Richard Dawkins of "The Critique of Pure Reason". I'll keep searching.