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eBook 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary ePub

eBook 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary ePub

by Cornelius C. Kubler,Weiguo Zhang,Liwei Jiao

  • ISBN: 0415598931
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Cornelius C. Kubler,Weiguo Zhang,Liwei Jiao
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (January 26, 2011)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1326 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1646 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr doc docx
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 962

Description

frequency dictionary, 500 Chinese Common Idioms presents a beautiful marriage between a dictionary and a textboo. I cannot praise this book enough.

frequency dictionary, 500 Chinese Common Idioms presents a beautiful marriage between a dictionary and a textboo. It is) a quality resource in any Chinese learner and teacher’s librar. .Its value extends beyond a supplementary textbook, a dictionary, or a collection of idiom stories. An important part of Chinese culture, idioms have a long history in China. 30 people found this helpful.

500 Common Chinese Idioms is the ideal tool for all intermediate to advanced learners of Chinese. Key features include: the idiom in both simplified and traditional characters. a literal English translation and English equivalents. two suitable example sentences, plus explanations and usage notes

500 Common Chinese Idioms i. ossibly the first lexicographical work that thoroughly and consistently lists the .

500 Common Chinese Idioms i. ossibly the first lexicographical work that thoroughly and consistently lists the Chinese characters, pinyin, and English translation for entries and example sentences. 29 people found this helpful.

Liwei Jiao is Lecturer in Chinese at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his P. Cornelius C. Kubler, Stanfield Professor of Asian Studies and Chair of the Department of Asian Studies at Williams College, received his . in Chinese Linguistics in 2003 from Nankai University in Tianjin, China. degrees in linguistics from Cornell University, with a second . in Chinese literature from National Taiwan University.

Download Citation On Jun 30, 2016, Yong Ho and others published 500 Common Chinese Idioms: an Annotated Frequency . A Collocational Dictionary of Common Chinese Verbs (with English Explanations). By YannongWang and PangyongJiao.

Download Citation On Jun 30, 2016, Yong Ho and others published 500 Common Chinese Idioms: an Annotated Frequency Dictionary. Heidelberg: Julius Groos Verlag, 1985.

500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary . Liwei Jiao (author), Cornelius C. Kubler (author), Weiguo Zhang (author).

500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary (Hardback). This practical dictionary is suitable both for class use and independent study and will be of interest to students and teachers of Chinese alike. The authors have done a magnificent job explaining this important dimension in the use of Chinese.Liwei Jiao, Cornelius C. Kubler, Weiguo Zhang. Published by Routledge 2010-11-23 (2010).possibly the first lexicographical work that thoroughly and consistently lists the Chinese characters, pinyin, and English translation for entries and example sentences.

Jiao, Liwei; Kubler, Cornelius . Zhang, Weiguo (2013). 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary (Kindle e. A Chinese-English Dictionary of Chinese Idioms.

500 Common Chinese Idioms book. Start by marking 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary. by. Kubler. 500 Common Chinese Idioms is the ideal tool for all intermediate to advanced learners of Chinese.

500 Common Chinese Idioms is the ideal tool for all intermediate to advanced learners of Chinese. Based on large corpora of authentic language data, it presents the 500 most commonly used Chinese idioms or chengyu, along with a variety of synonyms, antonyms and the most common structures, enabling the reader to make educated guesses about the meanings of hundreds of unfamiliar idioms.

Key features include:

the idiom in both simplified and traditional characters

a literal English translation and English equivalents

two suitable example sentences, plus explanations and usage notes

a Pinyin index and stroke order index.

This practical dictionary is suitable both for class use and independent study and will be of interest to students and teachers of Chinese alike.

Comments

Androlhala Androlhala
If you are a native English speaker studying Chinese, this chengyu dictionary is an absolute must.

I have spent years being frustrated by a) chengyu dictionaries that were only written in Chinese without any pinyin or other help for non-native Chinese speakers, b) chengyu books with stories in English that explain the chengyu, but don't give examples of how to use it or how common the chengyu is. FINALLY, the authors of this book have recognized a need for a better chengyu dictionary for English speakers, and have created the perfect chengyu resource. It includes ALL possible features helpful to English-speaking students (i.e. pinyin, simplified and traditional characters, example sentences, thoughtful explanations that don't rely on English idioms, explanations of subtleties in meaning and usage, and pinyin and stroke order indices).

However, the BEST part is that the chengyu are listed according to frequency of usage in Chinese society. At the beginning of the book, the authors explain how they used corpus data to determine which 500 chengyu are most frequently used. This is SO helpful! I can study all the chengyu in this book with confidence that I am going to hear them being spoken and see them in books and newspapers! It also validates my previous language-learning efforts. I cannot tell you how delighted I was to find that some of the chengyu I have learned over the years are actually in the top 50. Now I know it was worth my time memorizing them!

I am so pleased with this book and the ingenuity and thoughtfulness of its authors that I am going to recommend it to all of my friends who are learning or teaching Chinese. I cannot praise this book enough. Thank you, Jiao Liwei, Cornelius C. Kubler, and Zhang Weiguo for providing the English-speaking world with this amazing resource!
Cordantrius Cordantrius
This is a nice book for self-study at the intermediate to advanced level. The idioms are often heard in common speech even in normal conversation, in the same way an American speaker might say "raining cats and dogs" or use a literary expression such as "all's well that ends well". The book has the usual Routledge attention to attractive typesetting and clear layout. The idioms are arranged in order of use, according to an extensive study. So the learner can begin at the start with confidence that the material will be almost immediately useful.
Ƀ⁞₳⁞Ð Ƀ⁞Ǿ⁞Ɏ Ƀ⁞₳⁞Ð Ƀ⁞Ǿ⁞Ɏ
500 Common Chinese Idioms does have features that commend it: historical and literary explanations that provide a background to the idioms listed, an innovative methodology in selecting those most frequently used in writing and speech and, finally, example sentences that show usages in practical application. Why then do I dislike the book? I find its image deeply marred by the use of example sentences that on occasion qualify as rank political propaganda for the statist regime currently governing China and which clearly reflect racist or xenophobic nationalism, to boot. Two very good examples of this may be found on pages 177 and 183: on the former, one example sentence suggests that wholesale worship of things foreign leads to bullying social behaviors while, on the latter, the example sentence there stridently proclaims that China is opposed to any criticism of its human rights record by other countries. It is true that Professor Jiao and his colleagues tell the reader in the book's Introduction that nothing in the contents of any of the book's sentence examples is indicative of their personal beliefs. Nevertheless, the inclusion of such sentences violates a cardinal rule that any self-respecting reference work should follow and that is not to allow partisan political sentiments or cultural prejudices to begin coloring content (and here I wish to make it clear that I would have criticized this book equally severely had it included example sentences pandering to a pro-western cultural or political stance). As things stand, I must deem 500 Common Chinese Idioms a missed opportunity to reach more promising heights in the crafting of a good reference work. And I confess myself very unforgiving at the product I ended up getting and which is now resting silently at the bottom of my wastebasket.
Hulore Hulore
Kindle edition is absolutely useless. Chinese writings are rendered as image, not as text, and the size and resolution make them unintelligible. I was not able to comfortably use this e-book even on the Amazon Cloud Reader. What a shame to present such a nice work in such an abominable way.
MOQ MOQ
This applies to the Kindle edition only. DO NOT BUY! Only the English and Pinyin content is actually in an e-book font. The Hanzi are all image files, and so tiny you need a magnifying glass to make them out. Calling this a Kindle edition at all is false advertising.

I have returned the Kindle edition for a refund, and when that goes through I plan to buy the actual book.
Araath Araath
Buy the hard copy. The Kindle, which I unfortunately bought, has Chinese character that are so small that even changing text as large as possible does not help - and the letters are then way too big. I just ordered the hard copy as well, because the preview shows the characters as the same size as letters - hope that's right. Maybe someone knows how to make the Kindle Chinese characters larger - I can't see how.
Vosho Vosho
Chinese characters way too small to read comfortably, and this can't be adjusted. Filled with typos. It's like they didn't even try. Terrible ripoff for such an expensive book.