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eBook Imagining Our Americas: Toward a Transnational Frame (Radical Perspectives) ePub

eBook Imagining Our Americas: Toward a Transnational Frame (Radical Perspectives) ePub

by Sandhya Shukla,Heidi Tinsman

  • ISBN: 0822339501
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Sandhya Shukla,Heidi Tinsman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 20, 2007)
  • Pages: 424
  • ePub book: 1951 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1347 kb
  • Other: rtf lit txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 350

Description

Sandhya Shukla is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of India Abroad: Diasporic Cultures of Postwar America and England. Heidi Tinsman is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine.

Sandhya Shukla is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of Partners in Conflict: The Politics of Gender, Sexuality, and Labor in the Chilean Agrarian Reform, 1950–1973, also published by Duke University Press.

Sandhya Shukla, Heidi Tinsman. Sandhya Shukla is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies at Columbia University. This rich interdisciplinary collection of essays advocates and models a hemispheric approach to the study of the Americas.

Imagining Our Americas. Radical Perspectives. Duke University Press Books. Taken together, the essays examine North and South America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific as a broad region transcending both national boundaries and the dichotomy between North and South. American Studies and Latin American Studies as two distinct fields.

Imagining Our Americas: Toward a Transnational Frame (Radical Perspectives) Jun 29, 2007. by Sandhya Shukla, Heidi Tinsman. See Author Pages Frequently Asked Questions. Toward a Transnational Frame (Radical Perspectives). by Sandhya Rajendra Shukla. Published June 2007 by Duke University Press.

About the author (2007). Bibliographic information. Imagining Our Americas: Toward a Transnational Frame Radical Perspectives.

November 2009 · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Sandhya Shukla, Heidi Tinsman

Sandhya Shukla, Heidi Tinsman.

Rachel Adams, Blackness Goes South: Race and Mestizaje in Our America, in Sandhya Rahendra Shukla and Heidi Tinsman, ed. Imagining Our Americas: Toward a Transnational Frame (Durham: Duke University Press, 2007). Domingo F. Sarmiento, Vida de Abran Lincoln. Décimosesto Presidente de los Estados Unidos (New York: A. Appleton and C. 1866);Google Scholar. Gene M. Brack, Mexico Views Manifest Destiny, 1821–1846: An Essay on the Origins of the Mexican War (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1975);Google Scholar.

This rich interdisciplinary collection of essays advocates and models a hemispheric approach to the study of the Americas. Taken together, the essays examine North and South America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific as a broad region transcending both national boundaries and the dichotomy between North and South. In the volume’s substantial introduction, the editors, an anthropologist and a historian, explain the need to move beyond the paradigm of U.S. American Studies and Latin American Studies as two distinct fields. They point out the Cold War origins of area studies, and they note how many of the Americas’ most significant social formations have spanned borders if not continents: diverse and complex indigenous societies, European conquest and colonization, African slavery, Enlightenment-based independence movements, mass immigrations, and neoliberal economies.

Scholars of literature, ethnic studies, and regional studies as well as of anthropology and history, the contributors focus on the Americas as a broadly conceived geographic, political, and cultural formation. Among the essays are explorations of the varied histories of African Americans’ presence in Mexican and Chicano communities, the different racial and class meanings that the Colombian musical genre cumbia assumes as it is absorbed across national borders, and the contrasting visions of anticolonial struggle embodied in the writings of two literary giants and national heroes: José Martí of Cuba and José Rizal of the Philippines. One contributor shows how a pidgin-language mixture of Japanese, Hawaiian, and English allowed second-generation Japanese immigrants to critique Hawaii’s plantation labor system as well as Japanese hierarchies of gender, generation, and race. Another examines the troubled history of U.S. gay and lesbian solidarity with the Cuban Revolution. Building on and moving beyond previous scholarship, this collection illuminates the productive intellectual and political lines of inquiry opened by a focus on the Americas.

Contributors. Rachel Adams, Victor Bascara, John D. Blanco, Alyosha Goldstein, Héctor Fernández L’Hoeste, Ian Lekus, Caroline F. Levander, Susan Y. Najita, Rebecca Schreiber, Sandhya Shukla, Harilaos Stecopoulos, Michelle Stephens, Heidi Tinsman, Nick Turse, Rob Wilson