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» » The Last of the Name: Memories of Donegal
eBook The Last of the Name: Memories of Donegal ePub

eBook The Last of the Name: Memories of Donegal ePub

by Charles McGlinchey

  • ISBN: 085640361X
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Charles McGlinchey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstaff Press (June 1, 1986)
  • Pages: 144
  • ePub book: 1639 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1197 kb
  • Other: azw lrf docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 176

Description

Charles McGlinchey was a weaver whose occupation became redundant with the advent of textile mills. Much of his family moved to America for economic opportunity.

Charles McGlinchey was a weaver whose occupation became redundant with the advent of textile mills. The details of daily life-poems, experiences, deprivations and cultural artifacts-are what make this slim volume a treasure

Charles McGlinchey's book is wonderful. It manages to convey a sense of the cultural wealth which rural Ireland possessed until so recently. He himself fitted very much into the 'Seanachai' tradition, and we should be thankful that some of his knowledge has been preserved.

Charles McGlinchey's book is wonderful. The delightful thing about the book is the simplicity of the material.

Charles McGlinchey (1861-1954) was a weaver by trade, and lived his entire life on the Inishowen peninsula in the northwest of Ireland. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, McGlinchey dictated his personal memories of life and Irish history to a local schoolmaster, and these eventually formed his memoirs entitled The Last of the Name. The product is fine and as I hoped.

Charles McGlinchey, Patrick Kavanagh, Brian Friel. Charles McGlinchey (1861-1954) lived his entire life on the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal

Charles McGlinchey, Patrick Kavanagh, Brian Friel. Charles McGlinchey (1861-1954) lived his entire life on the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal. On winter evenings in the 1940s and 50s, McGlinchy would visit friend Patrick Kavanagh and talk about his life and times. Kavanagh wrote down McGlinchey's words in their entirety.

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Author of The last of the name, The last of the name, Le dernier du nom (Latitude Ouest). The last of the name. Le dernier du nom (Latitude Ouest).

last of the name' Charles McGlinchey (1861-1954), weaver and tailor, lived his entire life on the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal.

And after my day the grave will t be opened again, for I'm the last of the name' Charles McGlinchey (1861-1954), weaver and tailor, lived his entire life on the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal. Never married, he outlived his brothers and sisters, ne of whom left an heir and so he became 'the last of the name'.

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A memoir of life in Ireland's rural County Donegal. "Full of emotional truth and the beauty of immediate, trusting speech, overbrimming with folklore of great imaginative richness."â?”Seamus Heaney. Edited with an Introduction by Brian Friel.

Comments

Frei Frei
I am in the early stages of writing a book about life in County Donegal during the 19th century. This book is one of a few primary sources that describe what life was like for the people in this county.
The book is superbly produced-- from the book design to its typefaces, it's beautifully executed. Considering how this material was obtained, the book is well edited. To me reading the book is like sitting around a turf fire in Ireland, listening to a very old man lovingly describe a time that was long since past. He mentions many people and places, mostly within the parish of Inishowen. One thing I would have liked to see is an index. Without an index it's difficult to determine if an ancestor is mentioned in the book.
The book contains many Irish words and common phrases that were in use at the time. The book also contains songs and poems in Irish (with English translations) that perhaps are not recorded anywhere else. Much of what he recounts was part of the Oral Tradition of the countryside.
In some ways reading this book brought sadness to my heart. My great-grandparents were born in Donegal around 1820. This book describes some of the hardships that they had to endure. It chronicles a way of life, and a people that are no more. McGlinchey speaks to this regarding the Irish language, "Down to my young days there was nothing spoken in this parish at fair or chapel or gathering of any kind but Irish.... The English language came in greatly in my own time and in the one generation Irish went away like the snow off the ditches."
Unh Unh
Although the book is written in a style that is often hard to understand the first time through, it is well worth rereading a sentence slowly and, sometimes, more than one time. Each chapter is colorfully written as it was told, in the manner of an old Irishman filled with memories of a time that has long since evaporated in the mist of time. Still, in each of his memories, the reader can see traces of that time still living in the Irish people who have evolved from them. I recommend this book to anyone who, like myself, seeks to find out what life was like for Irish ancestors who lived their lives in a very different time.
Datrim Datrim
A great story of Ireland history and of one's man' life.
Dead Samurai Dead Samurai
I loved reading this book filled with stories of everyday life in Ireland. This is the history that gets lost when it is not passed down in story, oral or written, from generation to generation. I was particularly struck by the women naming their cows. This explained a bit of my family's history as Fannie McGlinchey, Charles' sister who emigrated to America, had a cow named Cynthia. Growing up, I always thought that was incredibly unique, that my great grandmother's cow was Cynthia. Yes, this book is a wonderful glimpse into the rich history of Ireland and my McGlinchey family.
Arashitilar Arashitilar
This is real history. Regards to Brian Friel and Patrick Kavanagh for capturing it.
Kulabandis Kulabandis
very informative of rural life in Ireland 100 years ago
Siramath Siramath
great stories of an end of an era
A fascinating vision of the time by someone with my same last name.