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eBook Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East ePub

eBook Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East ePub

by Khaled Ahmed

  • ISBN: 0195479564
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Khaled Ahmed
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 17, 2011)
  • Pages: 369
  • ePub book: 1491 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1781 kb
  • Other: txt lrf lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 904

Description

From 1991 to 1993 he was one of the founder members of Indo-Pak Neemrana Dialogue, track-two diplomacy. In 1996 he was a SAARC observer of the Bangladesh national elections and wrote the SAARC report on the status of the minorities in Bangladesh.

Author: Khaled Ahmed. Publication Date: 01/11/2010. This book traces the roots of the sectarian conflict in the Muslim past in India, and throws light at the new developments in the Middle East after the replacement of the socialist Arab leaders with religious scholars, and the rise of Shia Iran under Imam Khomeini.

Khaled Ahmed was in the Pakistan Foreign Service from 1969 to 1978. He left it to become a journalist of distinction in The Pakistan Times. According to the author, the sectarian violence can be traced back since from the Mughal period and during the British Raj (by some extend) but was low in intensity as compare to sectarian violence that is been faced by today’s Pakistan since 1947. The British Raj was able to almost completely uproot the Sunni-Shia confrontation during the tenure from 1857 to 1947.

Sectarian violence in Pakistan refers to attacks and counter-attacks against people and places in Pakistan motivated by antagonism toward the target's sect, usually a religious group. These attacks are carried out by different Deobandi terrorist groups. Targets in Pakistan include the Barelvi Sunni, Shia, Sufi, and the small Ahmadi, Hindu and Christian religious groups. As many as 4,000 people are estimated to have been killed in Shia-Sunni sectarian fighting in Pakistan between 1987–2007.

Items related to Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence an. .ISBN 13: 9780195479560. His previous books include Pakistan: Behind the Ideological Mask and Pakistan: The State in Crisis.

Sectarianism and sectarian conflict in the Middle East are often presented as having centuries-old religious . Its roots can be traced back to the failure of state-building in the Middle East and the 1979 Iranian revolution rather than centuries-old religious and political divisions.

Sectarianism and sectarian conflict in the Middle East are often presented as having centuries-old religious and theological roots. It is often said that sectarianism runs so deep in the region that it cannot be defeated, and we shouldn't bother trying. It has also been exacerbated by a set of subsequent developments, chief among them the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, the 2011 Syrian revolution, the war in Yemen and other ongoing issues. The roots of present-day sectarianism.

Outright sectarian conflict has been rare, but over recent decades tensions have risen, and sectarianism is at the root of much of the present-day violence in the Middle East

Outright sectarian conflict has been rare, but over recent decades tensions have risen, and sectarianism is at the root of much of the present-day violence in the Middle East. The schism goes back to the death of the prophet Muhammad in 632AD, and a disagreement over who should succeed him. Some Muslims believed that his successor should be chosen; others wanted a continuation of Muhammad’s bloodline. The majority of Muhammad’s followers backed Abu Bakr, a friend of the prophet, to inherit his office.

Sectarian War is an account of how the Shia-Sunni conflict was relocated from the Middle East to Pakistan after the rise of Revolutionary Iran in 1979, through the mediating agency of the rulers in Pakistan and the proliferation of the religious seminaries funded by Saudi Arabia. It examines the death of General Zia in the context of the sectarian conflict, goes into the process of production of apostatizing fatwas in Pakistan followed by violent action by organizations formed from the non-state actors used by the state for its covert wars.Sectarian War also delves into the state of the Shia communities in the Middle East and their historical connections with South Asia. It examines the rise of Shia culture in Lucknow and its formative influence on the rise of the Shia in Iraq, with a parallel scrutiny of the rise of Wahhabism and its infiltration of India in the eighteenth century, and records the origins and history of organizations doing sectarian terrorism in Pakistan and their linkages to Al Qaeda whose trajectory into a sectarian identity is also traced to the rise of Al Zarqawi as a parallel leader in Iraq. Sectarian War facilitates an understanding of the phenomenon of terrorism in Pakistan today.