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eBook The Rebirth of East Europe (4th Edition) ePub

eBook The Rebirth of East Europe (4th Edition) ePub

by Michael G. Roskin

  • ISBN: 0130341207
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Michael G. Roskin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pearson; 4 edition (June 10, 2001)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1102 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1676 kb
  • Other: docx rtf mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 472

Description

Chapter 8 borrows from my article on party systems in the March 1993 East European Quarterly.

Chapter 8 borrows from my article on party systems in the March 1993 East European Quarterly.

This book is designed to quickly enlighten readers about nature of East Europe. Caught between Empires. Flunking Democracy: The In This book is designed to quickly enlighten readers about nature of East Europe.

This book can be found in: History Regional & national history Europe. The Rebirth of East Europe (Paperback). Michael G. Roskin (author). For l courses in Eastern European Politics, Cold War History, Comparative Politics, International Relations. Designed especially to meet the needs of introductory-level students and to quickly enlighten them about East Europe, this comprehensive, multiperspective overview covers everything that's politically relevant for the region-geography, political history, Soviet occupation, Cold War, system collapse, and the struggles to found stable democracies.

By (author) Michael G. Roskin. Introduction: East Europe as a Unit of Study. 1. 2. Flunking Democracy: The Interwar Years

By (author) Michael G. Flunking Democracy: The Interwar Years. 3. East Europe and World War II. 4. The Communist Takeovers. 5. The Hated Regimes. 6. "We Pretend to Work": The Decay of Communism. 7. 1989: The Gorbachev Factor. 8. The Struggle for Democracy. 9. The Horrors of Yugoslavia. 10. Lessons, Hopes, Fears.

The most up-to-date treatment of East Europe, Roskin presents the region with all its problems and a realistic prognosis for the future.

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The Roskin book fits the bill perfectly as an introduction to the history of East Europe. I have been using it as an introductory book for students (including juniors and seniors) for years and it always praised by them.

ISBN-13: 978-0130341204. Product Dimensions: . x . inches. The Roskin book fits the bill perfectly as an introduction to the history of East Europe.

Michael G. Roskin, Lycoming College. We Pretend to Work : The Decay of Communism.

In the list that follows, notice how one experience leads to the next. All East European countries were parts of empires, most until the twentieth century. Once subjected to one empire, the East European victims usually fell into the clutches of another

This book is designed to quickly enlighten readers about nature of East Europe. Comprehensive and multiperspective--yet easy and enjoyable to read--it provides an accessible overview of everything that's politically relevant for the region—geography, political history, Soviet occupation, Cold War, and system collapse. Caught between Empires. Flunking Democracy: The Interwar Years. East Europe and World War II. The Communist Takeovers. The Hated Regimes. “We Pretend to Work” : The Decay of Communism. 1989: The Gorbachev Factor. The Struggle for Democracy. The Horrors of Yugoslavia. Lessons, Hopes, Fears. For those interested in Eastern European Politics, Cold War History, Comparative Politics, International Relations.

Comments

Erienan Erienan
While the book does present events in 20th century Eastern and Central Europe fairly succinctly, the author is clearly guided throughout by his political convictions. While an anti-communist stand is not surprising, Roskin's is quite virulent, and prevents any sense of academic detachment from appearing in the book. Besides, as one of the other reviewers noted, Roskin stoops to absurd simplifications in order to explain events in the region. For example, he blames the weakness of "East European" states on the fact that they were part of empires in the past. But, pardon me, what country in the world was not, at one time, part of an empire? How does that make "East Europe" different from any other region in the world?
As for the more technical aspects of the book, I found the maps in it to be crude, and the use of diacritics on East-Central European names very patchy: Roskin applied them to some names and not to others, perhaps revealing the fundamental problem with this book: a lack of first-hand knowledge of the region.
Nightscar Nightscar
It disturbs me to think that this book endeavors to "enlighten" novices on East Europe. The writing style is very accessible, and Roskin presents some intriguing ideas, particularly in his suggestion that geography, among other factors, has lead to the region's repeated subjugation. Yet gross simplifications, while keeping the work succinct, are quite misleading. The informal writing style, while quite readable, goes too far, bordering on unprofessional. Most importantly, Roskin's bias makes his analyses of East European communism insufferable. He has the gall to refer to the United States as "us" and "we," and seems to view the Cold War with the simplistic "Us against them" mentality of 1950s extremists from both camps. Finally, the long-term resentment of East Europeans for the communist regimes, while real, is portrayed as absolute and unanimous, and resistance efforts are absurdly romanticized. A far more objective and enlightening, though somewhat tedious text on this is R. J. Crampton's "Eastern Europe in the Twentieth Century - and After," published by Routledge. While the book is not meritless, to use "The Rebirth of Eastern Europe" is as the base of one's understanding of East Europe's communist period would be terribly unjust.
tamada tamada
This book is used as a part of an undergraduate class on Eastern European Politics at the university I attend taught by a prominent Serbian professor. With his endorsement, I'm confident that the material in this book is accurate.

I found this short book to be an excellent and fairly easy to follow introduction to the convoluted political history of Eastern/Central Europe. It was mentioned by another reviewer that Roskin attributes much of the conflict the region has seen over the past 20 years to the dueling Ottoman and Hungarian Empires. He also pointed out that much of world has been ruled under empire over history which is true. But the Ottoman and Hungarian Empires were occupants of the region, and as opposed to the empires that flourished during the 19th and 20th centuries, did little to nurture the concept of nation-state. That the people who lived within the borders of France were able to identify with the French flag with little regard to the concept of historical ethnicity is one of the reasons that France has flourished as a multi-ethnic state in the modern era. In the case of Eastern Europe, it seems that fighting often breaks out along ethnic and sectarian lines. Or so, Roskin theorizes.
Daron Daron
Its rare to find a text that is written in an accessible manner, which covers a lot of territory clearly, and which makes important analytical points. The Roskin book fits the bill perfectly as an introduction to the history of East Europe. I have been using it as an introductory book for students (including juniors and seniors) for years and it always praised by them. Unlike the only other Amazon reviewer, I did not find it biased, and the book provides plenty of factual material to allow students to make up their own mind about the issues.
Zan Zan
While this book provides a decent cursory review of East Europe, it is not to be taken as an authority on the subject. Many times, Roskin will oversimplify political agendas and use imprecise vocabulary to describe his subjects. For a comprehensive look at the political factors of the area, I would suggest something more along the lines of Henry Kissinger's Diplomacy.
Amis Amis
Of all the bad things I have read on Eastern Europe, this book is the worst. I already wrote a long criticism in reviewing another of Roskin's books, so I will not repeat it here, although he deserves all the criticism he can get. If "chitatel"'s students liked Roskin's book, it only goes to show how harmful the book is: uninitiated students, without other access to information on the region, read Roskin as if he were telling the truth.
Otiel Otiel
I must confess that the strength of this book is its organization. For education purposes may seem great - simple and comprehensive. However, as for the contents, it is very disappointing (example 1: the author is using we - Americans, and them - Soviets, East Europeans; example 2: the author exaggerates many issues - like pollution of the CEE and gives no factual data; example 3: he generally uses media, tabloid-style language).
This book is not a good source of knowledge for anyone. It is not appropriate for the beginners (BA level American students) because it gives a completely distorted and simplified picture of the CEE region. The person who knows nothing about the region may take this description as the reality, which is not correct.