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eBook Pity and Power in Ancient Athens ePub

eBook Pity and Power in Ancient Athens ePub

by Rachel Hall Sternberg

  • ISBN: 0521845521
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Rachel Hall Sternberg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 25, 2005)
  • Pages: 370
  • ePub book: 1824 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1478 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf lit azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 433

Description

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Start by marking Pity and Power in Ancient Athens as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Arguing that the exercise of power in democratic Athens, especially during its brief fifth-century empire, raised troubling questions about the alleviation and infliction of suffering, this book examines how pity emerged as a timely topic in Atheninan culture.

The nature of pity Rachel Hall Sternberg; 2. Pity and politics David Konstan; 3. The pitiers and the pitied in Herodotus and Thucydides Donald Lateiner; 4. A generous city: pity in Athenian oratory and tragedy; 5. Athenian tragedy: an education in pity James F. Johnson and Douglas C. Clapp; 6. Engendering the tragic Theates: pity, power, and spectacle in Sophocles' Trachiniae Thomas. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

In this book, Rachel Hall Sternberg draws on evidence from Greek oratory and historiography of the fifth and fourth centuries BCE to study the moral universe of the ancient Athenians: how citizens may have treated one another in times of adversity, when and how they were expected to help. She develops case studies in five spheres of everyday life: home nursing, the ransom of captives, intervention in street crimes, the long-distance transport of sick and wounded soldiers, and slave torture.

Rachel Hall Sternberg. Humane ideals were central to the image Athenians had of themselves and their city during the classical period. Tragic plays, which formed a part of civic education, often promoted pity and compassion

Rachel Hall Sternberg. Tragic plays, which formed a part of civic education, often promoted pity and compassion. But it is less clear to what extent Athenians embraced such ideals in daily life. How were they expected to respond, emotionally and pragmatically, to the suffering of other people? Under what circumstances? At what risk to themselves?

Автор: Hall Sternberg Название: Pity and Power in Ancient Athens Издательство: Cambridge Academ . Описание: This book addresses the question not how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality.

Описание: This book addresses the question not how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality.

Pity and Power in Ancient Athens. This book explores part of the moral universe of Ancient Athenians, trying to answer this question: What, in ancient Athens, were you supposed to do in the face of another person's misery? View. Tragedy offstage: Suffering and sympathy in Ancient Athens.

Mobile version (beta). Rachel Hall Sternberg. Download (pdf, . 7 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Rachel Hall Sternberg is Associate Professor of Classics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Tragic plays, which formed a part of civic education, often promoted pity and compassion.

Humane ideals were central to the image Athenians had of themselves and their city during the classical period  . How were they expected to respond, emotionally and pragmatically, to the suffering of other people?

Arguing that the exercise of power in democratic Athens, especially during its brief fifth-century empire, raised troubling questions about the alleviation and infliction of suffering, this book examines how pity emerged as a timely topic in Atheninan culture. Ten essays examine the role of pity in the literature, art, and society of classical Athens by analyzing evidence from tragedy, philosophy, historiography, epic, oratory, vase painting, sculpture, and medical writings. Athenians had power and used it ruthlessly, but the infliction of suffering did not mesh well with their civic self-images.