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eBook Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization (Oriental Institute Museum Publications (Paperback)) ePub

eBook Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization (Oriental Institute Museum Publications (Paperback)) ePub

by Emily Teeter

  • ISBN: 1885923821
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Emily Teeter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (March 28, 2011)
  • Pages: 284
  • ePub book: 1782 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1633 kb
  • Other: azw doc mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 578

Description

Before The Pyramids" is the catalogue of a recent exhibit, of the same name, that was mounted in 2011 by the Oriental Institute of Chicago.

Before The Pyramids" is the catalogue of a recent exhibit, of the same name, that was mounted in 2011 by the Oriental Institute of Chicago. A total of 129 objects are illustrated from the OIC's extensive collection of predynastic artifacts, that were acquired with Petrie's excavations at Abydos and elsewhere in the early 20th century.

Oriental Institute Museum Publications (OIMP). Essays on the rise of the state, contact with the Levant and Nubia, crafts, writing, iconography, and evidence from Abydos, Tell el-Farkha, Hierakonpolis, and the Delta, were contributed by leading scholars in the field.

The Oriental Institute Of The University Of Chicago.

OIM E26239 (photo by Anna Ressman) 2 o. cicago.

Before the Pyramids book.

The Rise of the Egyptian State. E. Christiana Köhler. Tomb U-j: A Royal Burial of Dynasty 0 at Abydos.

Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization. The Rise of the Egyptian State.

Items related to Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian . Book Description The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, 2011.

Items related to Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization. Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization (Oriental Institute Museum Publications). ISBN 13: 9781885923820. Published by The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (2011). ISBN 10: 1885923821 ISBN 13: 9781885923820.

Oriental Institute Museum curator Emily Teeter looks beyond King Tu. In this early society, the most valued pots were composed of earth found in the desert, far from population centers, and fired at a high temperature.

Oriental Institute Museum curator Emily Teeter looks beyond King Tut. Previous. 1/6. FIT FOR A KINGThe oldest inscribed statue of an Egyptian king, this limestone sculpture portrays King Khasekhem. 3/6. Photograph: Anna R. RessmanBOARD SILLY The early cultures weren�t all work and no play. Egyptians loved board games,� says Teeter, pointing to a game-board stand sculpted like a bull�s head and a lion-shaped game piece carved out of hippo ivory.

This catalogue for an exhibit at Chicago's Oriental Institute Museum presents the newest research on the Predynastic and Early Dynastic Periods in a lavishly illustrated format. Essays on the rise of the state, contact with the Levant and Nubia, crafts, writing, iconography and evidence from Abydos, Tell el-Farkha, Hierakonpolis and the Delta were contributed by leading scholars in the field. The catalogue features 129 Predynastic and Early Dynastic objects, most from the Oriental Institute's collection, that illustrate the environmental setting, Predynastic and Early Dynastic culture, religion and the royal burials at Abydos. This volume will be a standard reference and a staple for classroom use.

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Comments

Murn Murn
"Before The Pyramids" is the catalogue of a recent exhibit, of the same name, that was mounted in 2011 by the Oriental Institute of Chicago. A total of 129 objects are illustrated from the OIC's extensive collection of predynastic artifacts, that were acquired with Petrie's excavations at Abydos and elsewhere in the early 20th century. The exhibit and catalogue takes a new look at this material, and brings it up to date with current interpretations and discoveries.

The catalogue is edited by the exhibit's curator, Emily Teeter, with contributions by an international list of scholars including Stan Hendrickx, Gunter Dreyer, and many others. It is generously illustrated, and many of the objects are very attractive. Some of my favorites are a painted Naqada II vessel (cat. #2), a decorated ostrich egg (cat. #5), a charming bird-shaped stone vessel and other stone vessels from Naqada I-III (cat. #40-46), some ivory game-pieces (cat. #114), and a rare limestone seated statue of King Khasekhem (cat. #81).

The scholarly articles, that appear in the catalogue, present a range of current studies about predynastic Egypt that include dating, culture, writing, and interactions with Nubia and the Levant. If there is a unifying theme, it centers around the role of the king as the guarantor of order (ma'at) and smiter of disorder (isfet). David O'Connor for example, in a new interpretation of the Narmer Palette's obverse upper register, suggests that the king is enacting the Birth of Re with his beheaded captives.

Given the outstanding interest of predynastic Egypt - we are talking here about 3000 BC, with abundant and beautiful material to admire and learn from - my instinct is of course to recommend that everyone should go right out and buy this book. Realistically, however, I have to admit that it skews more towards the professional, or at least the enthusiastic amateur, reader. If you fall into either of those categories, you won't be disappointed.
Prinna Prinna
I am an academic who is currently doing research on Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egypt. It is difficult to get really good information and excellent photographs of artifacts together in the same publication. This book does that, and I refer to it frequently in my research. In general, Oriental Institute publications are very good, but I believe this one is excellent.
Xanzay Xanzay
Great read on a critical period that is coming to light through the painstaking and brilliant work of a diverse group of scientists, technicians, linguists, historians and laborers. Amazing what can be gleaned from sometimes meager physical evidence.
Brajind Brajind
This is an outstanding book that gives a lot of insight into what was going on in the Nile valley leading up to the dynastic period. Since the lead up to the pyramid building period is discussed much less frequently than the pyramid building (dynastic) period, you will likely learn a lot from this book.
Gavigamand Gavigamand
This is a great reference book. Excellent photos. Sections are written by experts in each area. Intro by Dr. Teeter.
Kelerius Kelerius
Excellent publication with very good images and clear information.
A very good one!
tamada tamada
Although this is a museum exhibit catalogue, more than half of it is made up of essays analyzing different aspects of the period it covers. It's meant to show the public the Predynastic and Early Dynastic periods, which are still not known widely enough. The book is freely downloadable from the Oriental Institute's website, making it even more accessible to the public.

The essays cover most of the major aspects of the Predynastic Period that you'd find in a more unified book on the subject: chronology, the culture of different periods, relationships with Nubia and the Near East, and so on. Because they're not all that long and neatly divided up by subject, I find them a little easier to read and absorb than the long chapters in other books on the Predynastic. They also discuss some fairly recent discoveries, like some unexpectedly large and complex early buildings at Hierakonpolis or the findings at Tell el-Farkha in the Delta, that aren't included in older sources.

My main problem is that a couple of these essays advocate a particular point of view a little too much for a book aimed at the public. The Tell el-Farkha essay claims that Egypt was fully unified long before Narmer, but that isn't the only possible interpretation of the evidence it cites. (Signs of Narmer's presence are more widespread in Lower Egypt than those of his predecessors and are even found in southern Canaan, so he may have completed the conquest of Lower Egypt and then moved beyond it.) David O'Connor's interpretation of the Narmer Palette is a particular problem, even though he admits that all interpretations of it are speculative. He bases his argument on religious ideas, such as Ra's role as the maintainer of Maat, that are not visible in the record until long after the palette was made. The first mentions of Ra and Maat only date to the Second Dynasty, if not later. I'm similarly annoyed that the catalogue description for a votive plaque says it was meant "to gain the favor of Osiris." A temple that was later dedicated to Osiris stood at this site, but until the end of the Old Kingdom, Khentiamentiu was that temple's deity.

The catalogue of objects is limited by the University of Chicago's collection, which doesn't have many of the large, impressive artworks from the period (most of those are in collections in Cairo, London, Paris, and Oxford). But the catalogue does show a good range of the kinds of artifacts produced during the Predynastic and Early Dynastic, including the animal-shaped palettes, the inscribed storage vessels and ivory tags that show us the very beginning of hieroglyphic writing, and those inescapable Naqada pots with their quirky stick-figure art. Despite a few flaws, it's a good way to get a feel for what the Predynastic and Early Dynastic were like.