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eBook The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response ePub

eBook The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response ePub

by Peter Balakian

  • ISBN: 0060198400
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Peter Balakian
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper; 1 edition (September 30, 2003)
  • Pages: 496
  • ePub book: 1663 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1203 kb
  • Other: lrf docx txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 105

Description

Peter Balakian tells the powerful and largely unknown story o. Peter Balakian is the author of Black Dog of Fate, winner of the PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for Memoir and a New York Times Notable Book, and June-tree: New and Selected Poems 1974–2000

Peter Balakian tells the powerful and largely unknown story of. This important and compelling book is long overdue. Deborah E. Lipstadt, P. Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies Director, Emory University). Peter Balakian is the author of Black Dog of Fate, winner of the PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for Memoir and a New York Times Notable Book, and June-tree: New and Selected Poems 1974–2000. He is the recipient of many awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship.

In this national bestseller, the critically acclaimed author Peter Balakian brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and of the Armenian Genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks.

The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response is a book written by Peter Balakian, and published in 2003

The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response is a book written by Peter Balakian, and published in 2003. It details the Armenian Genocide, the events leading up to it, and the events following it. It begins with the state of the Ottoman Empire in the 1880s. Abdul Hamid II has come to power, and there are many issues in the country that he is expected to solve. Specifically, the country was losing money and land

Includes bibliographical references (pages 449-465) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 449-465) and index.

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Epilogue: Turkish Denial of the Armenian Genocide and . By the early 1920s, the American response to the Armenian Genocide was divided between a passionate popular appeal for aid and justice, and the limits of the federal government-the State Department, the White House, and a powerful segment of the Senate, which was isolationist and Republican. The post–World War I power alliance with Kemal Atatürk’s new Turkish republic, and the American drive for oil in the Middle East, led to the abandonment of Armenia.

THE BURNING TIGRIS R The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response R PETER BALAKIAN To the victims and survivors of genocide everywhere CONTENTS R Map vi Preface ix PART I : THE EMERGENCE OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS IN AMERICA: Th. .

The Burning Tigris book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Peter Balakian tells the powerful and largely unknown story o. He Writes with Grace and Power. '�In this important book, Balakian proves adept at presenting both human horror and political tragedy.

Peter Balakian tells the powerful and largely unknown story of. it needs to be widely read. , "Richly Imagined and Carefully Documented. is brilliantly described.

Awarded the Raphael Lemkin Prize for the best scholarly book on genocide by the Institute for Genocide Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY Graduate Center.

In this groundbreaking history of the Armenian Genocide, the critically acclaimed author of the memoir Black Dog of Fate brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Peter Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Young Turk government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he also resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history.

During the United States' ascension in the global arena at the turn of the twentieth century, America's humanitarian movement for Armenia was an important part of the rising nation's first epoch of internationalism. Intellectuals, politicians, diplomats, religious leaders, and ordinary citizens came together to try to save the Armenians. The Burning Tigris reconstructs this landmark American cause that was spearheaded by the passionate commitments and commentaries of a remarkable cast of public figures, including Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ambassador Henry Morgenthau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Stone Blackwell, Stephen Crane, and Ezra Pound, as well as courageous missionaries, diplomats, and relief workers who recorded their eyewitness accounts and often risked their lives in the killing fields of Armenia.

The crisis of the "starving Armenians" was so embedded in American popular culture that, in an age when a loaf of bread cost a nickel, the American people sent more than $100 million in aid through the American Committee on Armenian Atrocities and its successor, Near East Relief. In 1915 alone, the New York Times published 145 articles about the Armenian Genocide.

Theodore Roosevelt called the extermination of the Armenians "the greatest crime of the war." But in the turmoil following World War I, it was a crime that went largely unpunished. In depicting the 1919 Ottoman court-martial trials, Balakian reveals the perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide confessing their guilt -- an astonishing fact given the Turkish government's continued denial of the Genocide.

After World War I, U.S. oil interests in the Middle East steered America away from the course it had pursued for four decades. As Balakian eloquently points out, America's struggle between human rights and national self-interest -- a pattern that would be repeated again and again -- resonates powerfully today. In crucial ways, America's involvement with the Armenian Genocide is a paradigm for the modern age.

Comments

Waiso Waiso
I finished The Burning Tigris three days ago. Overall, a very informative read about the Ottoman Empire's genocides on its Armenian minority, the responses of the US government and Americans, the responses of other European powers, as well as how the genocide is viewed presently. Below is a summary.

1) Armenian citizens of the Ottoman Empire were slaughtered both under the reign of Sultan Abdul Hamid II in the late 1800s and the CUP government of the Ottoman Empire in the early 1900s. Victims included men, women, and children.

2) The murders took place in a variety of ways. Citizens were slaughtered by Ottoman troops as well as Kurdish gangs. Many more were forced on mass transits from their homes in eastern Turkey to present day Syria whether by train or foot and died along the way. Men were often drafted into labor battalions of the Ottoman army and killed while "serving."

3) The governments of Britain, France, the US, and Russia did little to nothing to save the Armenians.

4) There was a substantial presence of American Protestant missionaries in Ottoman Turkey at the time who did much to save and shelter the victims. However, these missionaries opposed a declaration of war on Ottoman Turkey by the US due to fear of losing their property there.

5) President Woodrow Wilson, who was in debilitating health and likely influenced by missionary friends, did not declare war on Ottoman Turkey.

6) Largely due to Turkey's strategic location and influence in the oil-rich middle east, most countries do not recognize the massacres of millions of Armenians as genocide.

Less than 30 countries worldwide recognize the Armenian Genocide. The ones that do are mainly either in Europe or South America.
Thohelm Thohelm
Genocide or the deliberate destruction and murder of others based on race, religion, culture, gender, sexual orientation, or age has been a part of human society since the very beginning. The Holocaust against Jews, Gypsies, Gays and Lesbians, political dissidents and others considered "undesirable" by the Nazi government during their time in power was not the first genocide to occur in the 20th century. The genocide committed against the Armenian population during World War I forced thousands of Armenian residents to flee their homes, they were stripped of property, belongings and legal rights, often forced to change their religion, forced into concentration camps, murdered, and their women and children kidnapped by the Turks. This tragedy occurred primarily as a response to the despotic leadership of the Turkish Ottoman government at the time as many Armenian intellectuals in Turkey were part of what was termed "The Young Turks" movement which sought legal, religious, and political reform within the Ottoman Empire. Much like during the Holocaust the United States and other nations did very little to offer help to the victims other than allowing some to immigrate, and sending in assistance from private charitable organizations, and much like during the Holocaust our government and the governments of Europe knew what was going on and did nothing to stop it very early on even before World War I began (the oppression against Armenians began in the 1880s).

Balakian presents a historically accurate image of what the United States government knew and how they sought to address the deliberate genocide against the Armenians without becoming involved in World War I or other international conflicts occurring at the time. Balakian's writing is succinct, detailed, and he relies on primary source documents including US government documents from the period, letters and journals of Armenian victims of the genocide as well as letters and journals from Turks who participated in the genocide, and newspaper reports from the time. Overall this is a strong accounting of what occurred in Armenia between 1880 and 1918 and how it impacted the Armenian people. Balakian creates a powerful picture that shows that genocide effects everyone not just the victims.
Debeme Debeme
I found this book most helpful in understanding the Armenian Genocide in the early 1900s. I always wondered why my Mother would urge me to remember the starving Armenians when I didn't want to eat all of my dinner. In later years, I wondered how she as a young girl in Northern Indiana would have known what was happening to the Armenians. This book revealed the relationship between Christians in this country and in Turkey.

I was also most impressed to see that the build up to the Turkish Genocide of the Armenians was similar to the history in Europe before the Holocaust, and many believe that this was the prototype of all the genocides to follow, including the Holocaust, Bosnia, Ruwanda, etc. The impact of this piece of history continues to impact the Middle East to this day. This is both a sobering and informative reflection on a historical chapter about which we have heard, but know little.
Kriau Kriau
People need to know about the first real genocide of the 20th Century...committed by Turks against the Christian Armenians, Greeks, and Assyrians. Great background if you want to understand the world of today and what is happening in the Middle East. I read Balakian's other book, The Black Dog of Fate, and knew I had to read this one as well. Remember, Hitler thought he could get away with the killing of the Jews because the Turks got away with the killing of the Greeks and Armenians. His famous quote is, "After all, who remembers the Armenians?"
Alsanadar Alsanadar
Schools do not teach this tragic part of history. If it was not for the movie released a year ago on this genocide of Armenians by the Turkish Government and Kurds, I never would have learned about this. Shame on the US government for choosing money over justice.