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eBook The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten ePub

eBook The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten ePub

by Gerald Horne

  • ISBN: 0520243722
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Gerald Horne
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press; 1 edition (September 19, 2006)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1350 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1140 kb
  • Other: rtf txt lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 930

Description

The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten. University of California Press (2006). The White Pacific: . Imperialism and Black Slavery in the South Seas After the Civil War.

The Final Victim of the Blacklist: John Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten. "Gerald Horne", Political Affairs.

This extraordinary treatment of one of the most interesting and controversial figures in Hollywood scene of the 1930s-40s demonstrates superior, indeed prodigious, scholarship. This is an outstanding work that richly deserves our attention. Paul Buhle, author of Radical Hollywood". From the Inside Flap. This is the best and most carefully written of the author's many books, and that is something in itself.

University of California Press berkeley. John Howard Lawson was not pleased. This year was to prove to be the driest. in the history of Los Angeles ;1 meanwhile, a steady rain had descended on Washington.

Before he attained notoriety as Dean of the Hollywood Ten-the blacklisted screenwriters and . John Howard Lawson was not pleased

John Howard Lawson was not pleased.

attained notoriety as Dean of the Hollywood Ten-the blacklisted screenwriters and directors persecuted because of their varying ties to the Communist Party-John Howard Lawson had become one of the most brilliant, successful, and intellectual screenwriters on th. .

After his infamous, almost violent, 1947 hearing before the House Un-American Activities Committee, Lawson spent time in prison and his lucrative career was effectively over

Engaging Portrait of The Ten's Most Controversal Figure. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. This is an indespensible addition to the Hollywood Blacklist Canon.

Before he attained notoriety as Dean of the Hollywood Ten-the blacklisted screenwriters and directors persecuted . The roasting encounter endured by Lawson in Washington in the fall of 1947 was a turning point for this writer, now well into his fifties.

Before he attained notoriety as Dean of the Hollywood Ten-the blacklisted screenwriters and directors persecuted because of their varying ties to the Communist. Since his romantic diversions some years back, his marriage to Sue Lawson had stabilized; yet this ordeal, combined with his blacklisting from Hollywood, placed added pressures on his family.

The process of rehabilitating the victims of Mongolia’s political purges of the 1930s and compensating their children and . This is the transcript of an interview conducted with Jacques Rancière by Marie-Aude Baronian and Mireille Rosello from the University of Amsterdam and ASCA.

The process of rehabilitating the victims of Mongolia’s political purges of the 1930s and compensating their children and grandchildren continues, but from time to time more remains of victims are found rid itself of all the bad practices of its past.

Before he attained notoriety as Dean of the Hollywood Ten—the blacklisted screenwriters and directors persecuted because of their varying ties to the Communist Party—John Howard Lawson had become one of the most brilliant, successful, and intellectual screenwriters on the Hollywood scene in the 1930s and 1940s, with several hits to his credit including Blockade, Sahara, and Action in the North Atlantic. After his infamous, almost violent, 1947 hearing before the House Un-American Activities Committee, Lawson spent time in prison and his lucrative career was effectively over. Studded with anecdotes and based on previously untapped archives, this first biography of Lawson brings alive his era and features many of his prominent friends and associates, including John Dos Passos, Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles Chaplin, Gene Kelly, Edmund Wilson, Ernest Hemingway, Humphrey Bogart, Dalton Trumbo, Ring Lardner, Jr., and many others. Lawson's life becomes a prism through which we gain a clearer perspective on the evolution and machinations of McCarthyism and anti-Semitism in the United States, on the influence of the left on Hollywood, and on a fascinating man whose radicalism served as a foil for launching the political careers of two Presidents: Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. In vivid, marvelously detailed prose, Final Victim of the Blacklist restores this major figure to his rightful place in history as it recounts one of the most captivating episodes in twentieth century cinema and politics.

Comments

Risinal Risinal
excellent; Gerald Horne has written a well documented biography capturing all the facets of this remarkable man John Howard Lawson.
Fenrinos Fenrinos
For many of us with an interest in the Hollywood blacklist period, John Howard Lawson appears as something of a negative symbol. Variously characterized as a Stalinist hardliner, a cultural commissar, and a hack writer, he frequently comes across as the least sympathetic of the purge victims. The image is usually that of a one dimensional minion of the party line, without either imagination or compassion. Horne's strongly focused biography attempts to get beyond the cliches to the details of the man's work as both writer and activist. The result is a much more complex portrait than what the public image conveys. But perhaps more importantly, Lawson's career also charts the rise and fall of the Communist Party in Southern California and the wrenching struggle to organize screenwriters within the industry that employed him. Thus, the book follows not only Lawson's career but those larger events that he strove so mightily to influence. Horne's meticulously researched book is indispensible for anyone interested in those topics.

Several miscellaneous comments. What we learn of Lawson the man comes mainly from his professional life and little from the personal side. I wish there were more anecdotes about the personal side that might reveal more about the man than what the writer-activist reveals, which frankly tends to confirm the cultural-commissar accusations. Also, the text could use better editing, as, for example, the numerous points at which Lawson is said to have "committed" to the party. For me, that got confusing. As to the often leveled charge that Hollywood reds smuggled propaganda lines into their movies-- that claim is thoroughly debunked by both Lawson and Horne, showing how many layers of supervision scripts had to pass through before reaching the screen. Lastly, the book is very revealing about the way in which the blacklist was used to strengthen the role of producers at the expense of writers, which, I believe, amounts to a lesser known aspect of the period.

Whatever one thinks of Lawson's politics, it's apparent that he remained a steadfast champion of social equality and economic justice throughout his life. Moreover, he participated at the center of one of America's most tumultuous and treacherous periods, with literary and film-maker contacts far and wide. In fact, it may not be possible to understand the trajectory of modern American film-making without the kind of insight into that crucial post-war period that Horne provides. Thanks to the author, the public now has an opportunity to better assess both the the Dean of the Hollywood Ten and his times. For, as the book shows, the two are inseparable in many ways-- ways that are still with us, as the anti-Moslem hysteria and repressive Patriot Act abundantly illustrate.
Granirad Granirad
This is an indespensible addition to the Hollywood Blacklist Canon. The author reevaluates Jack Lawson's plays, screenwriting, and political development, as well as documenting the conflicts of the Hollywood Left of the thirties and forties. The depth of research of this book is impressive, with Lawson's extensive self-analysis layered throughout the text. The author also mines such primary sources as FBI files and the then Red Baiting "Hollywood Reporter" for additional insight. A scholarly yet very readable book, this is a must for anyone interested in radical American politics of the period, Hollywood, and the Blacklist.