cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music)
eBook Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music) ePub

eBook Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music) ePub

by Grigory Kogan,Svetlana Belsky

  • ISBN: 1580463355
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Grigory Kogan,Svetlana Belsky
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Rochester Press (January 30, 2010)
  • Pages: 197
  • ePub book: 1735 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1958 kb
  • Other: lrf docx lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 658

Description

Knyt, E. E. (2011) Busoni as Pianist, by Grigory Kogan, translated and annotated by Svetlana Belsky (Eastman Studies in Music). In: Notes, Vol. 67, No. 3, pp. 553-554.

Knyt, E. Find it on Google Scholar. Drag and drop files here.

Series: Eastman Studies in Music (Book 73. Belsky contextualizes Kogan's seemingly conflicting endorsement and criticism of Busoni's career as a response by Kogan to the extreme pressures of the Soviet system.

Series: Eastman Studies in Music (Book 73). Hardcover: 200 pages. Publisher: University of Rochester Press (January 30, 2010). ISBN-13: 978-1580463355. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches.

Items related to Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music). Grigory Kogan (1901-1979) was a leading Soviet pianist and music critic. A conservatory professor at the age of twenty-one, Kogan created the first-ever course in Russia dealing with the history and theory of pianism. Grigory Kogan Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music). ISBN 13: 9781580463355. Busoni as Pianist (Eastman Studies in Music).

Автор: Grigory Kogan, Svetlana Belsky Название: Busoni as Pianist Издательство: Wiley . Поставляется из: Англии Описание: A translation of the only book that focuses solely on the pianistic aspect of Busoni& wide-ranging career.

Поставляется из: Англии Описание: A translation of the only book that focuses solely on the pianistic aspect of Busoni& wide-ranging career. Дополнительное описание

Ferruccio Busoni is most widely known today as the composer of such works as the Second Violin Sonata, the incidental . But Busoni was also renowned in his day as an author and pedagogue and, most especially, as a pianist.

Ferruccio Busoni is most widely known today as the composer of such works as the Second Violin Sonata, the incidental music for Gozzi's Turandot, and the most monumental piano concerto in the repertory (some eighty minutes long, with male chorus in the finale).

Foreword by Nina Svetlanova.

As such, it will be of interest to pianists, teachers and students of the piano, historians, and all who love piano music and the art of piano playing. Foreword by Nina Svetlanova.

Eastman Studies in Music. Grigory Kogan (1901-1979) was a leading Soviet pianist and music critic

Eastman Studies in Music. By (author) Grigory Kogan, By (author) Svetlana Belsky. Svetlana Belsky is a teacher and performer, and is coordinator of Piano Studies at the University of Chicago.

Svetlana Belsky is the author of the recently published book "Busoni as Pianist" (Eastman Studies in Music, University of Rochester Press, 2010). M. L. Rantala (Hyde Park Herald, 2/2/2011. Ferruccio Busoni performed by a "passionate pianist and scholar" Belsky leaps from one glorious melody to the next with ease, as the dancing, flirting music swirls about the room".

Grigory Kogan, Svetlana Belsky. Ferruccio Busoni is most widely known today as the composer of such works as the Second Violin Sonata, the incidental music for Gozzi's Turandot, and the most monumental piano concerto in the repertory (some eighty minutes long, with male chorus in the finale). Busoni's recordings of pieces by Chopin and Liszt - and of his own arrangements of keyboard works by Bach and Beethoven - are much prized and studied today by connoisseurs of piano playing.

Ferruccio Busoni is most widely known today as the composer of such works as the Second Violin Sonata, the incidental music for Gozzi's Turandot, and the most monumental piano concerto in the repertory (some eighty minutes long, with male chorus in the finale). But Busoni was also renowned in his day as an author and pedagogue and, most especially, as a pianist. Busoni's recordings of pieces by Chopin and Liszt -- and of his own arrangements of keyboard works by Bach and Beethoven -- are much prized and studied today by connoisseurs of piano playing. Yet even his most important biographers have cast only a cursory glance at the pianistic aspect of Busoni's fascinating career. Grigory Kogan's book Busoni as Pianist (published in Russian in 1964, and here translated for the first time) was and remains the first and only study to concentrate exclusively on Busoni's contributions to the world of the piano. Busoni as Pianist summarizes reviews of Busoni's playing and his own writings on the subject. It also closely analyzes the surviving piano roles and recordings, and examines Busoni's editions, arrangements, and pedagogical output. As such, it will be of interest to pianists, teachers and students of the piano, historians, and all who love piano music and the art of piano playing. Grigory Kogan (1901-1979) was a leading Soviet pianist and music critic. A conservatory professor at the age of twenty-one, Kogan created the first-ever course in Russia dealing with the history and theory of pianism. Through his brilliant lectures, his concert performances, and his many books, articles, and reviews, Kogan influenced an entire generation of Soviet pianists. Svetlana Belsky is a teacher and performer, and is coordinator of Piano Studies at the University of Chicago.

Comments

Darksinger Darksinger
This book is a treat for Busoni lovers in the English speaking world. The musical and technical examples plus fingerings demonstrate Busoni's autodidactic accomplishments in all their peculiarities. The reviews of his performances in Russia have to my knowledge never appeared before in any other published books or articles. As such they are an essential addition to this literature. The translator, for whom this enterprise is an obvious labor of love, makes apologies for the author, mr. Kogan, who apparently had to frame Busoni's contributions and liabilities in a somewhat Marxist manner, (which even contemporary Marxists would describe as 'vulgar'.) Without getting into detail, the notion of labeling Busoni as a 'realist' is utter nonsense. By example, he fought against realism in the theater in a way which cannot be misinterpreted. What 'realism' in instrumental music could possibly be can only be answered by those who had to live in the Soviet Union. The rest of us will naturally roll our eyes.
The book is not seriously compromised by this aspect; like the translator suggests, you can bracket those remarks and set them aside. The problem essentially is that mr. Kogan seems never to have heard Busoni play. He's limited to trying to reconstruct a picture of Busoni's pianistic address second hand. This leads to a decidedly partial view of the master's playing that leads the listener/reader to possibly think he knows more than he really does.
For instance, Russian reviews lead mr. Kogan to believe that Busoni did not command a real triple forte, the kind that Hofmann, Rosenthal or in our own day, Volodos can produce. Yet Bonavia wrote, "Busoni commanded a wider range of tone than any living pianist..it led him to a tone which can only be called 'white, a quality that was cold and almost inanimate... from this perfectly even basis he would start and build up a climax that reached the extreme limit of what is possible to a pianist, an avalanche of sound giving the impression of a red flame rising out of marble.." This doesn't sound like someone (like perhaps Glenn Gould) who flinched from exhibiting power at the keyboard. This is just one example that demonstrates the phenomenological limitations that Kogan is up against.
This is a greater and more pertinent deficiency than the ideological nonsense that made this publication possible in the Soviet Union. Moreover I'm not convinced that Kogan is familiar with Dr. Faust, the magnum opus that Busoni was aiming at almost all his adult life. He hardly mentions it, which is like appraising Tchaikovsky while omitting the 6th symphony. Having said all this, it would be easy to believe that I'm panning this book. Actually there is much of great value that you can't get even from Sitsky's 'Busoni and the Piano.' So if you're interested in the phenomenon that was Ferruccio Busoni, this should in any case be in your library. -- Geoffrey Dorfman
PanshyR PanshyR
This new translation of Grigory Kogan's "Busoni as Pianist" is a valuable addition to the pianist's library. Busoni's influence on modern piano performance - through innovations in articulation, dynamics, and interpretation, to name just a few = are under-appreciated. As well, Busoni broadened the staid concert repertory of his era to include, for example, the works of J.S. Bach and Mozart. Kogan documents Busoni's interpretive approach to various composers, such as his energetic, "manly" style of performing J.S. Bach. Kogan provides a window onto an important age of pianism in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries during which styles of performance were rapidly evolving, yet maintaining their tethers to inherited traditions. Better understanding performance history broadens our appreciation of the particular choices made by performers and teachers today.

Svetlana Belsky's translation is spirited and stylish. Her efforts to document Kogan's sources provide valuable paths for additional research and reading. For those not sufficiently aware of the oppressive hand of Soviet authorities on all forms of cultural expression, Belsky provides a valuable, sobering introduction to the currents of Soviet culture during the first sixty years of the twentieth century. Belsky contextualizes Kogan's seemingly conflicting endorsement and criticism of Busoni's career as a response by Kogan to the extreme pressures of the Soviet system.
BORZOTA BORZOTA
My impressions and understanding of "Busoni as Pianist" emanate from my status as a piano student, not as a university or music scholar. Grigory Kogan's astute and incisive study of Busoni provides an opportunity for his readers to come away enriched with a deep respect and appreciation for the pianist. He brings to life the fact that throughout Busoni's arrangements and performances, he displayed a profound commitment to maintaining the spirit and intent of each master composer. Grigory Kogan's book is a gift to all who yearn to improve their lives with a greater knowledge and understanding of Busoni as a man, arranger, performer and as a citizen of Russia during a tumultuous time in history.
It is obvious that Svetlana Belski's translation of Kogan's book is rooted in her integrity as a scholar and truth seeker, in her intense desire and focus to faithfully transcribe Kogan's words and ideas, and finally, as a gifted pianist who understands the complexities inherent in the world of music. We are extremely fortunate for her luminous translation, one that will benefit generations of students, performers and scholars.
Carrie White