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eBook Religion without God ePub

eBook Religion without God ePub

by Ronald Dworkin

  • ISBN: 0674726820
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Ronald Dworkin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1 edition (October 1, 2013)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1988 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1580 kb
  • Other: txt lrf mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 443

Description

But this, his last, book, Religion Without God, is about value and religious experience. The book is based on the Einstein lectures that Dworkin delivered at the University of Bern in 2011.

But this, his last, book, Religion Without God, is about value and religious experience. In those lectures he addressed questions about the meaning of life and the sublimity of nature, about the intoxicating experience of celestial and earthly beauty, and about our commitment to objective goods whose value transcends the preferences of those who keep faith with them.

Ronald Dworkin’s profound and moving final book, now published posthumously, is unique among the works that he wrote throughout the decades of his extraordinarily creative life.

Only 20 left in stock (more on the way). Ronald Dworkin’s profound and moving final book, now published posthumously, is unique among the works that he wrote throughout the decades of his extraordinarily creative life. Anyone who read Dworkin or heard him lecture knows that he possessed a brilliant and elegant mind, conceptually sophisticated, analytically astute, and always at the service of a moral, legal, and political cause.

We publish here an excerpt from the first chapter. The familiar stark divide between people of religion and without religion is too crude. Many millions of people who count themselves atheists have convictions and experiences very like and just as profound as those that believers count as religious

We publish here an excerpt from the first chapter. Many millions of people who count themselves atheists have convictions and experiences very like and just as profound as those that believers count as religious.

PDF Criticism of Ronald Dworkin's work titled "Religion without God" which postulates the relegation of religion to the private sphere. Religion without God. Ronald Dworkin. Cambridge, Massachusetts, and London, England: Harvard University. 2013, 180 . ISBN 978-0-674-72682-6, $ 17-95. Professor Ronald Dworkin undoubtedly ranks high on the list of popular. and influential liberal legal philosophers. Until his death in February 2013, Dworkin produced a host of scholarly contributions. His last book, namely. Religion Without God (RWG)1 (which was published posthumously) has.

In his last book, Ronald Dworkin addresses timeless questions: What is religion and what is God's place in it? What are death and immortality? He joins a sense of cosmic mystery and beauty to the claim that value i. .

In his last book, Ronald Dworkin addresses timeless questions: What is religion and what is God's place in it? What are death and immortality? He joins a sense of cosmic mystery and beauty to the claim that value is objective, independent of mind, and immanent in the world.

Religion Without God book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. But this book is marked by a different tone and style.

In his last book, Ronald Dworkin addresses questions that men and women have asked through the ages: What is religion and what is God's place in it?

Ronald Dworkin’s Religion Without God, the philosopher’s first posthumous work, appeared in bookstores a few days before Francis made his statement - even though Harvard University Press listed it as an October book.

Ronald Dworkin’s Religion Without God, the philosopher’s first posthumous work, appeared in bookstores a few days before Francis made his statement - even though Harvard University Press listed it as an October book. When he succumbed to leukemia in February, Dworkin was a professor of law and philosophy at New York University and an emeritus professor of jurisprudence at University College, London. Surely it’s a matter of providence at work, or at least of synchronicity, depending on which way you’ve staked that existential wager.

In his last book, Ronald Dworkin addresses questions that men and women have asked through the ages: What is religion and what is God's place in it? What is death and what is immortality? Based on the 2011 Einstein Lectures, Religion without God is inspired by remarks Einstein made that if religion consists of awe toward mysteries which "manifest themselves in the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, and which our dull faculties can comprehend only in the most primitive forms," then, he, Einstein, was a religious person.

Dworkin joins Einstein's sense of cosmic mystery and beauty to the claim that value is objective, independent of mind, and immanent in the world. He rejects the metaphysics of naturalism--that nothing is real except what can be studied by the natural sciences. Belief in God is one manifestation of this deeper worldview, but not the only one. The conviction that God underwrites value presupposes a prior commitment to the independent reality of that value--a commitment that is available to nonbelievers as well. So theists share a commitment with some atheists that is more fundamental than what divides them. Freedom of religion should flow not from a respect for belief in God but from the right to ethical independence.

Dworkin hoped that this short book would contribute to rational conversation and the softening of religious fear and hatred. Religion without God is the work of a humanist who recognized both the possibilities and limitations of humanity.

Comments

Yar Yar
This short volume is engaging and easy to read, particularly if one is familiar with Ronald Dworkin's thinking in previous works, especially "Justice for Hedgehogs" (Belknap/Harvard, 2011). "Religion without God" continues the earlier volume's argument for the existence of an objective realm of values and therefore emphasizes the critical personal and social importance of ethics. Dworkin, in that respect, goes against the grain of relativism and subjectivism popular in discussions of values. The current volume, however, clarifies one of his roots in this regard: he explains that, in his view, it is possible to be "religious" by acknowledging the realm of value without necessarily believing in God or the gods. He argues in the first chapter for a "religious atheism", and he goes on to argue throughout the book that this religious atheism need not be in conflict with other religious orientations.

A second chapter examines "the universe" and modern physics' view of the universe for evidence of that realm of value. In particular the scientist finds beauty to be a key manifestation of the reality of value, as many of the rest of us do. Dworkin actually does an amazingly good job of unpacking a lot of pretty sophisticated scientific thinking, the kind of unpacking that happens all too seldom in college survey education in science not to mention secondary education. It is all the more remarkable that he is not a scientist himself.

The third chapter evokes Dworkin's background as a law professor in exploring "religious freedom", including the degree to which religious views and beliefs can be expressed publicly without infringing on the freedoms of others to be religious in their own ways or free from others' religiousity. He explores issues as diverse as public and school prayer and abortion.

Finally there is a short concluding chapter on "death and immortality". The chapter feels unfinished, but it does argue for an immortality that derives from "living well", from being the successful author of one's own life, another important theme in Dworkin's larger opus. And it is touching in that this was Professor Dworkin's last book, a book which apparently made several statements he thought to be very important in his end-of-life reflections.

The book is based on the Einstein Lectures delivered at the University of Bern in 2011. Dworkin apparently meant to expand what he left us here, and indeed the book seems incomplete both in scope and also in terms of a unifying theme. While his death regrettably cut short his project, what we have in "Religion without God" contributes significantly not only to discussions of ethics and law, not only to thinking about value, not only to a fuller understanding of this fascinating thinker, but also to possible discussions of what religion is. It is well known that religion does not necessarily need a god, as in Buddhism, but perhaps "atheism" is too loaded a word to be quite accurate or adequate for the purpose here. I would suggest a better title might have been "religion without theism".
Landarn Landarn
Regarding the first chapter "Religious Atheism": I really do not understand the late Mr. Dworkin's effort to combine religion and atheism. If he wishes to add a spiritual dimension to atheism there are quite a few books on the worldview of Religious Naturalism, as atheism is not a worldview. However, Mr. Dworkin takes exception to the Naturalism and the works of Richard Dawkins (an ethology and evolutionary biologist).

As I read this book, what keeps popping into my mind is Plato's Theory of Forms. In Mr. Dwokin's case his thinking is about value. He seems to want to make value a real objective thing rather than a process of the mind. I see an interesting parallel with the pseudo-science of Intelligent Design and Mr. Dwokin's reliance on mathematicians. Intelligent Design claims professional scientists among it's ranks but most are mathematician with few from the biological scientist ranks. Similarly, there is no biology to be found in this book.
energy breath energy breath
It is nice to read a book with facts and opinions but one that balances valid points on all sides without pounding an agenda. It is a bit of a difficult read for anyone used to reading recreational novels but worth the time.
FRAY FRAY
Glad I read it. Would recommend it.
caif caif
very good.
IWAS IWAS
The book is a synthesis of Dworkin's philosophy on religion. As such, his message is clear to those readers who are versed in philosophy, religious or otherwise. He, however, does not spell out the argument for some of the positions he posits. He assumes the reader can fill in the argument. This is somewhat unfortunate for he presents an important message, one that all literate thinking people should contemplate.
ladushka ladushka
Ronald Dworkin was undoubtedly a brilliant thinker, but he was known to indulge in semantics in debates with his fellow intellectuals. `Religion without God' advances Dworkin's thesis that one can be an atheist and still have a religion. At times he appeared to be indulging in semantics in the parts where he discussed the definitions of God and religion. Thankfully, Dworkin, though not always right, is usually clear. Dworkin was firmly an atheist, a term he uses in the strict sense that it is a person who does not believe in a personal god or gods. But he believes that atheists may be of two sorts - those who while not believing in a specific supreme being, nonetheless, have a `numinous' sense of `something nonrational and emotionally deeply moving', and those who do not have such a sense. What Dworkin recognised was that some atheists have a sense of spiritualism which does not involve believing in a personal god that was directing the universe and their lives. That is hardly an original thought because spiritualism is recognised, though not always as that term, but as an extension of one's emotional self. In any case, this spiritualism does not involve what theists call `God'. What Dworkin was pushing in this book, was the right to recognise beliefs in atheistic spiritualism as a form of religion, and thus a right that is amenable to constitutional protection. It is a short, well-argued thesis.
Often this subject can become quite thick with a tangled underbrush of jargon-like words. This is not the case here. Wonderful book!!