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eBook The Death of Death: Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought ePub

eBook The Death of Death: Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought ePub

by Rabbi Neil Gillman PhD

  • ISBN: 1879045613
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Rabbi Neil Gillman PhD
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Jewish Lights; 1 edition (March 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1636 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1888 kb
  • Other: docx azw lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 183

Description

The Death of Death: Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought

The Death of Death: Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought. In The Death of Death, noted theologian Neil Gillman offers readers an original and compelling argument that Judaism, a religion often thought to pay little attention to the afterlife, not only presents us with rich ideas on this subject-but delivers a deathblow to death itself. Combining astute scholarship with keen historical, theological and liturgical insights, Gillman outlines the evolution of Jewish thought about bodily resurrection and spiritual immortality.

RABBI NEIL GILLMAN A native of Quebec City, Rabbi Neil Gillman is. .

RABBI NEIL GILLMAN A native of Quebec City, Rabbi Neil Gillman is Professor Emeritus of Jewish Philosophy at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes . Neil Gillman was born in Quebec City, Canada on September 11, 1933. He gave aspiring rabbis and congregants in the Conservative movement new ways to talk about God, death, and the afterlife

In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes a history of the development of Jewish views about the afterlife. He begins by explaining that what Orthodox Jews consider. He studied philosophy and French literature at McGill University in Montreal. He studied at the Jewish Theological Seminary in Manhattan and was ordained as a rabbi in 1960. He gave aspiring rabbis and congregants in the Conservative movement new ways to talk about God, death, and the afterlife. He was also an important advocate for the movement's ordination of women and gays.

In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes a history of the development of Jewish views about the afterlife. He begins by explaining that what Orthodox Jews consider history is in fact simply "myth

In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes a history of the development of Jewish views about the afterlife. He begins by explaining that what Orthodox Jews consider history is in fact simply "myth. Gillman is quite clear that he does not believe that God revealed His word to His special people, but that Judaism is rather the result of some men grasping to understand God. He affirms belief in God and believes that God has sown knowledge of Himself throughout his creation, but to believe that God has revealed Himself to man is to engage in idolatry

In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes a history of the development of Jewish views about the afterlife. He affirms belief in God and believes that God has sown knowledge of Himself throughout his creation, but to believe that God has revealed Himself to man is to engage in idolatry

The Death of Death Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought.

The Death of Death Resurrection and Immortality in Jewish Thought.

The Death of Death gives new and fascinating life to an ancient debate

The Death of Death gives new and fascinating life to an ancient debate. This new work is an intellectual and spiritual milestone for all of us interested in the meaning of life, as well as the meaning of death. Neil Gillman, rabbi and PhD, is professor of Jewish philosophy at The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, where he has served as chair of the Department of Jewish Philosophy and dean of the Rabbinical School.

Download PDF book format. Publication, Distribution, et. Woodstock, V.Jewish Lights, (c)1997. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The death of death : resurrection and immortality in Jewish thought Neil Gillman. Book's title: The death of death : resurrection and immortality in Jewish thought Neil Gillman. Library of Congress Control Number: 96030048. Physical Description: 318 p. ;, 24 cm. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-307) and index. Rubrics: Death Religious aspects Judaism History of doctrines Future life Doctrines.

In The Death of Death, noted theologian Neil Gillman offers readers an original and compelling argument that Judaism, a religion often thought to pay little attention to the afterlife, not only presents us with rich ideas on this subject but delivers a deathblow to death itself.

Strangest Last Meal Requests On Death Row - Продолжительность: 11:16 BE AMAZED Recommended for you. 11:16. Репродукция фильм фантастика (2017) - Продолжительность: 1:42:53 serial Recommended for you.

Does death end life, or is it the passage from one stage of life to another?

In The Death of Death, noted theologian Neil Gillman offers readers an original and compelling argument that Judaism, a religion often thought to pay little attention to the afterlife, not only presents us with rich ideas on this subject―but delivers a deathblow to death itself.

Combining astute scholarship with keen historical, theological and liturgical insights, Gillman outlines the evolution of Jewish thought about bodily resurrection and spiritual immortality. Beginning with the near-silence of the Bible on the afterlife, he traces the development of these two doctrines through Jewish history. He also describes why today, somewhat surprisingly, more contemporary Jewish scholars―including Gillman―have unabashedly reaffirmed the notion of bodily resurrection.

In this innovative and personal synthesis, Gillman creates a strikingly modern statement on resurrection and immortality.

The Death of Death gives new and fascinating life to an ancient debate. This new work is an intellectual and spiritual milestone for all of us interested in the meaning of life, as well as the meaning of death.

Comments

Kieel Kieel
I studied with Professor Gilman at JTS thirty years ago and he is just as engaging in print as he is in real life. A must have addition to anyone's library whether you are Conservative, Reform or Frum.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor The Apotheoses of Lacspor
In the Death of Death, Conservative Jewish theologian Neil Gillman writes a history of the development of Jewish views about the afterlife. He begins by explaining that what Orthodox Jews consider history is in fact simply "myth." Gillman is quite clear that he does not believe that God revealed His word to His special people, but that Judaism is rather the result of some men grasping to understand God. He affirms belief in God and believes that God has sown knowledge of Himself throughout his creation, but to believe that God has revealed Himself to man is to engage in idolatry. This position is much more assumed than demonstrated.

Most of the rest of the book is a much more straightforward presentation of the history of Jewish views on the afterlife. Like most scholars, Gillman finds little evidence of firm views on any kind of afterlife in the earlier books of the Old Testament. His review of the relevant passages is informative as he traces an increased concern for the afterlife, culminating in the affirmation of bodily resurrection. Although Gillman entertains the possibility that foreign influence was at least partly responsible for the development of resurrection belief, he seems to lean towards it being a natural outgrowth of core Jewish belief.

As we move beyond the Old Testament, Gillman continues tracing Jewish beliefs, noting the introduction of the concept of the immortality of the spirit. His use of sources is somewhat less helpful here. Although Jewish sources are reviewed proficiently, he gives insufficient attention to first century Christian sources. While lamenting a lack of sources about the Pharisees - and dismissing the Torah as a credible source for their beliefs - he gives short shrift to valuable Christian sources from the time period, such as Paul's letters and Acts.

Gillman then charts the "Canonization" of bodily resurrection in Jewish thought through the Talmud and into the Middle Ages. He spends an entire chapter on Maimonides, a Jewish philosopher whom he credits with moving Judaism away from bodily resurrection to an emphasis on spiritual resurrection. Thereafter, he discusses the mystics, who also played a role in spiritualizing Jewish afterlife belief. Add in the Enlightenment and Jewish intellectual, though not religious, assimilation into modern Europe, and the Reform and Conservative Judaism of the 19th century has largely abandoned bodily resurrection, once the cornerstone of its faith, in favor of spiritual immortality, the hallmark of Judaism's long-time competitor, Greek philosophy. Little space is given to the Orthodox.

But Gillman's book is not just about history, it is about the present. He sees a return to an emphasis on bodily resurrection in Reform and Conservative Judaism, though still couched in terms such as "symbol" and "myth." The return to an emphasis on bodily resurrection is explained well as a return to Judaism's emphasis on God's concern for the present life and his power to shape our futures. But as with the author's own apparent re-embrace of bodily resurrection, it is unclear just what is meant. It is accepted, but only as "myth" and "symbol." To Gilman, to believe it is literally true is to "trivialize" God. This assertion, like the one that to believe God revealed His word to Moses is to engage in anti-Jewish idolatry, are disappointingly conclusory. It comes across more as one mired in quasi-naturalistic assumptions than a rigorous theological or even philosophical conclusion.

The history in the book, with the exception of neglecting Christian sources and the knowledge they can shed on Second Temple Jewish afterlife beliefs, is well presented. Gillman ably covers 3,000 years of Jewish attitudes on the afterlife. Also well presented is the reasoning behind certain shifts in beliefs and the leading thinkers behind those shifts. The book, however, is steeped in the author's less-than-adequately-explained use of terms such as "symbol" and "myth" and "literal," that left this reader at times wondering just what it is that was really believed. Put another way, what do you really believe if you say you believe in bodily resurrection but only as a "symbol" and not as a "literal" redemption? In what way does that give hope and affirm God's goodness and value for the present human condition? There may be answers to these questions but I did not find them in this book.
Goltigor Goltigor
As a Christian who is not qualified to either affirm or dispute Gillman's studies, I do however find them fascinating. Modern Christianity has lost sight of the fact that its faith flows from, as opposed to being completely severed from, Judaism. Heaven or Hell when you die is the default view, but does it have its base in the Hebrew Scriptures? Gillman can shed light on this.
Jia Jia
Excellent reference / resource materiel.
Qwne Qwne
I have not read the book in it's entirely yet. It has a great deal of scientist's views on God and death. Lots of biblical content. Nice to see a book from the Jewish perspective.
uspeh uspeh
I just started reading the first edition of this book 1997 and turned to page 121 and so may come back and add to these comments. However, on page 121 Gillman states "Jesus is quite explicit" in Acts 23:6-7 : "I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees; I am on trial concerning the hope of the resurrection of the dead." The author cited the "The Holy Bible," New Revised Standard Version, 1989 Oxford University Press edition as the source of this quote.
However, I looked up Acts 23:6 in that Bible edition and read:" When Paul noticed that some were Sadducees and others were Pharisees, he called out in the council, 'Brothers, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees. I am on trial concerning the hope of the resurrection of the dead' ."
So Gillman was actually quoting only part of verse 6 and not also verse 7 and left out the first part of verse 6 beginning with "When Paul ... "and ending with "Brothers."So the Bible is attributing these words to Paul and not Jesus as the author Gillman stated..
This leads me to question the whole integrity and reliability of Gillman's book. How carefully and or truthfully has Gillman quoted sources? Was he intentionally giving a partial quote to support his contention that the words he quoted were spoken by Jesus?