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eBook Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception, and the Secrets that Destroyed Two of the Cold War's Most Important Agents ePub

eBook Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception, and the Secrets that Destroyed Two of the Cold War's Most Important Agents ePub

by David C. Martin

  • ISBN: 1585748242
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: David C. Martin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; 1st edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1728 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1532 kb
  • Other: lit lrf mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 911

Description

Wilderness of Mirrors" was a mandatory part of my professional training back in 1982. It is certainly one of the 5 best books I have ever read on intelligence and espionage.

Wilderness of Mirrors" was a mandatory part of my professional training back in 1982. This purchase was just to make sure I had a copy in my personal library. I found myself wanting to know more about the beginnings of the CIA as well as their cold war exploits. This book was recommended to me by a friend and is a good starting point to find out about some of the key players in the US intelligence of previous years.

Wilderness of Mirrors book.

org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Wilderness Secrets.

Enthralling, provocative. At the dawn of the Cold War, the world’s most important intelligence agencies-the Soviet KGB, the American CIA, and the British MI6-appeared to have clear-cut roles and a sense of rising importance in their respective countries.

At the dawn of the Cold War, the world’s most important intelligence agencies-the Soviet KGB, the American CIA, and the British MI6-appeared to have clear-cut roles and a sense of rising importance in their respective countries. But when Kim Philby, head of MI6’s Russian division and arguably the twenty-first century’s greatest spy, was revealed to be a Russian mole along with British government heavyweights Donald Maclean and Guy Burgess, everything in the Western intelligence world turned upside down.

Wilderness of Mirrors : Intrigue, Deception and the Secrets That Destroyed Two of the Cold . This book goes a long way toward explaining CIA's intellectual and operational constipation in the 1950's through the 1970's.

Wilderness of Mirrors : Intrigue, Deception and the Secrets That Destroyed Two of the Cold War's Most Important Agents.

You would sit on a sofa’: David C. Martin, Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception, and the Secrets that Destroyed Two of the Cold War’s Most . Martin, Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception, and the Secrets that Destroyed Two of the Cold War’s Most Important Agents (Guilford, CT, 2003), p. 18. ‘perhaps the ablest’: Philby, My Silent War, p. 105. ‘Was it freedom’: ibid. p. 108. ‘Not one of them’: ibid. copies of the material provided’: Edward Harrison, The Young Kim Philby: Soviet Spy and British Intelligence Officer (Exeter, 2012), p. 177. ‘something of the greatest importance’: Philby, My Silent War, p. 121. ‘That evening I worked late’: ibid. Don’t worry, old man’: Borovik, The Philby Files, p. 178.

Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception and the Secrets That Destroyed Two of the Cold War's Most Important .

Wilderness of Mirrors: Intrigue, Deception and the Secrets That Destroyed Two of the Cold War's Most Important Agents. ISBN 978-1-58574-824-2. David C. Martin, John L. Walcott, Best laid plans: the inside story of America's war against terrorism Harper & Row, 1988, ISBN 9780060158774. com/2100-18564 162-524917.

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Comments

Keth Keth
Since its establishment in 1947, CIA has enjoyed some modest successes as an agent for regime change, but does not to appear to have been a very effective intelligence agency. Yet during the first 25 years of its existence under the freewheeling influence of the many WWII Office of Strategic Services (OSS) veterans who formed its original cadre, it certainly seems to have been an interesting place to work. Indeed its halls were apparently filled with interesting and colorful characters who may or may not have been very good intelligence officers, but who were never boring. This very good book provides the story of two such characters who were at the heart of the CIA counterintelligence program.

James Jesus Angleton was clearly CIA material with his WWII OSS experience, Ivy League education, and international background. Yet he was also by all accounts one the strangest intelligence officers CIA ever recruited. An orchid growing intellectual, Angleton began his long involvement with counterintelligence with the OSS under the tutorship of Kim Philby, who even then was a Soviet mole. He appeared to thrive on the intellectual challenges presented by convoluted and complex work that was counterintelligence. From the first he applied himself to seeking out Soviet agents within CIA with the passion and zealotry of a Jesuit converting a heretic. In the end his efforts failed to find real evidence of Soviet penetration of CIA, but in the notorious `mole' search he initiated succeeded in virtually destroying its ability to run clandestine operations against the Soviets. Ironically for all his zeal, Angleton was unable to recognize that his mentor and friend Philby was a Soviet plant in heart of the delicate U.S. and UK intelligence relationship.

William King Harvey was Angleton's complete opposite in every respect. He was a small town lawyer turned FBI agent who was sacked because his behavior came too close to breaking the number one rule of the FBI in the post war period, don't embarrasses Mr. Hoover. Somewhat like Angleton however, Harvey had developed a passion for counterintelligence work and when he was sacked was probably the FBI's leading expert in this arcane subject. The newly created CIA was struggling to create a counterintelligence program and was happy to take Harvey on board. He and Angleton quickly learned to loathe each other. The hard drinking, womanizing Harvey tended to shoot from the hip, while the aesthetic Angleton tended to move carefully and intellectually. Fortunately Harvey decided that he would like the rough and tumble of overseas work and got a plume assignment in the then divided city of Berlin where he was clearly at home. Prior to taking this assignment however, Harvey presented CIA with what in the end was an accurate argument that Philby was indeed a Soviet plant.

In the end the careers of both men were destroyed by the very things that made them effective counterintelligence agents and the sea changes that shook CIA in the 1970's
Nahn Nahn
I am a military intelligence officer who is on the verge of retirement. "Wilderness of Mirrors" was a mandatory part of my professional training back in 1982. It is certainly one of the 5 best books I have ever read on intelligence and espionage. This purchase was just to make sure I had a copy in my personal library.
Pipet Pipet
I found myself wanting to know more about the beginnings of the CIA as well as their cold war exploits. This book was recommended to me by a friend and is a good starting point to find out about some of the key players in the US intelligence of previous years. There isn't much about background or the beginnings of the CIA, this book is more of a character study of two men, James Jesus Angelton, who most people are familiar with and William Harvey, whom most people seem not to know(including me at the time). It is an interesting tale of how two men got so wrapped up in their own ego's as well as paranoia that they brought CIA intelligence operations to a halt. It also paints the CIA as an agency without a clear direction and poorly managed. This book had the effect that all good non-fiction books have on me, it casued me to do more research on the events and people in the book. Great read if you want to see the effect 2 men can have on an agency but don't expect a broad history of the CIA.
Galanjov Galanjov
Definitely a classic. Inspires me to do further reading on Angleton. I found the Philby section quite interesting. I am presently reading Fair Play by Olson which is also quite good.
MisterQweene MisterQweene
A page turning look into the dark and confusing world of espionage during the cold war.
Ienekan Ienekan
Outstanding book. Makes you rethink everything you thought you knew. How can anyone possibly relax after reading this fascinating book.
Cesar Cesar
Fascinating and authoritive potted history of the CIA.
this is an important book, but of course it leaves the unknowable its due. perhaps even in 1963 the answers were unknowable. did angleton set into motion a plot the horrific outcome of which surprised even himself? anyone have any thoughts?