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eBook Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series) ePub

eBook Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series) ePub

by Nobuo Inoue,Edward E. Daub

  • ISBN: 0299127303
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Nobuo Inoue,Edward E. Daub
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (November 15, 1990)
  • Pages: 800
  • ePub book: 1534 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1252 kb
  • Other: doc txt rtf mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 521

Description

Kanji For Understanding Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series). Edward E. Daub is professor emeritus of engineering and professional development at the University of Wisconsin–Madison

Kanji For Understanding Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series). Daub is professor emeritus of engineering and professional development at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. R. Byron Bird is professor emeritus of chemical engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Nobuo Inoue was professor of mechanical engineering at the Science University of Tokyo. Series: Technical Japanese Series.

Basic Technical Japanese book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Intermediate Technical Japanese, Volume 2: Glossary (Technical Japanese Series).

Other books in this series. Basic Technical Japanese. Daub Nobuo Inoue was professor of mechanical engineering at the Science University of Tokyo. provides the reader with thoughtful instruction on how to utilize the chapters to their full potential. It contains copious materials, exercises, instructional information, and valuable teaching hints. Michio Tsutsui, Journal of Japanese Studies. Well-structured and carefully written.

Title:-Basic Technical Japanese. Daub is professor emeritus of engineering and professional development at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Byron Bird is professor emeritus of chemical engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Country of Publication.

com: Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series) (9780299127343): Edward E. Daub, R. Byron Bird, Nobuo Inoue: Books It is not focused on computer science, however

com: Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series) (9780299127343): Edward E. Byron Bird, Nobuo Inoue: Books It is not focused on computer science, however  . Answered Jul 2, 2014 · Author has 906 answers and . m answer views. There's this book, which is very good. com: Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series) (9780299127343): Edward E. Byron Bird, Nobuo Inoue: Books. It is not focused on computer science, however. I'm not personally aware of any books with such a focus.

Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series). by Edward E. Byron Bird, Nobuo Inoue. ISBN 9780299127343 (978-0-299-12734-3) Softcover, University of Wisconsin Press, 2010. Find signed collectible books: 'Basic Technical Japanese (Technical Japanese Series)'.

Edward E. Basic Technical Japanese takes you step by step from an introduction to the Japanese writing system through a mastery of grammar and scientific vocabulary to reading actual texts in Japanese. You can use the book to study independently or in formal classes. This book places special emphasis on the kanji (characters) that occur most often in technical writing.

Basic Japanese-English dictionary by Kokusai K̄orȳu Kikin - 1986 - 958 pages. Basic structures in Japanese - 1984 - 480 pages. Basic technical Japanese by Edward E. Daub, Nobuo Inoue, Robert Byron Bird - 1990. Daub, Nobuo Inoue, Robert Byron Bird - 1990 - 800 pages. Basic terms of Shinto - 1985 - 82 pages

Basic Technical Japanese takes you step by step from an introduction to the Japanese writing system through a mastery of grammar and scientific vocabulary to reading actual texts in Japanese.

Basic Technical Japanese takes you step by step from an introduction to the Japanese writing system through a mastery of grammar and scientific vocabulary to reading actual texts in Japanese.

Even if you have had no Japanese-language training, you can learn how to translate technical manuals, research publications, and reference works. Basic Technical Japanese takes you step by step from an introduction to the Japanese writing system through a mastery of grammar and scientific vocabulary to reading actual texts in Japanese. You can use the book to study independently or in formal classes.     This book places special emphasis on the kanji (characters) that occur most often in technical writing. There are special chapters on the language of mathematics and chemistry, and vocabulary building and reading exercises in physics, chemistry, biology, and biochemistry. With extensive character charts and vocabulary lists, Basic Technical Japanese is entirely self-contained; no dictionaries or other reference works are needed.

Comments

Gri Gri
This book teaches technical Japanese by the Klingon education method: the subject is hard, so its teaching should be just as hard, and its learning should be most difficult. But that's meant as no insult. This book pulls no punches in teaching Japanese. It *is* a hard subject to learn. I'm already far into JLPT/N4, yet here I am now in Ch 10 after a couple days and there is so much I've learned that I never got from traditional college level instruction material, eg Genki or Nakama. This is an almost completely different way of learning Japanese, by picking through the bones of actual college and professional level written language. It does little if any hand-holding. You have been warned: there is a rocky road ahead. But it leads to a glorious and fruitful end you won't get any other way.

I wouldn't suggest this book to anyone who hasn't already started into learning Japanese basics, but if you're in the neighborhood of N5 and really want to read Japanese science materials (and I do!), then this book is for you.
Zolorn Zolorn
"Basic Technical Japanese" is a monumental achievement. It allows a newcomer to Japanese, on his or her own, to acquire a reading knowledge as well as a cultural understanding of the language within the technical context. From day one, you will feel a real sense of accomplishment and by the end of the text, you will definitely be able to pick up almost any technical article in Japanese and with your trusty dictionary (suggestions on appropriate dictionaries are offered by the authors) be able to read and understand it. This text is also being used in the classroom. One of my favorite books and a good bargain at this price.
Skunk Black Skunk Black
Great reference for anyone wanting to learn to read and write technical Japanese.
Heraly Heraly
This book is an excellent resource for those who wish to stay ahead of the curve on academic information. Biotech and nanobiotech papers are frequently unpublished in English for a while after Japanese publication, and this book (along with supplementary books of the same series) gives you the tools and directions necessary to grasp desired information within several weeks of learning. I also appreciated the list of recommended additional literature for learning Japanese and technical translation that this book provides in the early chapters.
Kagalkree Kagalkree
This is a marvelous book: in a few weeks you will be able of reading and writing phrases like: "zinc and chlorhidric acid mix to produce hydrogen and heat". Very clear, well constructed with a lot of examples and exercises. It does not need a dictionary or else it is totally self contained.
Kulabandis Kulabandis
Thank you!
Nagor Nagor
Book was not as instructional as I had hoped. I was expecting a little more of a text book but that is my fault as I didn't have much Japanese experience at that time.
I basically agree with many of the other reviewers, but want to be a bit more specific. I attended the Cornell FALCON Program many years ago which focuses on spoken Japanese, but the biggest problem thereafter was developing a professional vocabulary for reading. Virtually all textbooks I knew until this one (except the Jorden book "Reading Japanese" which only covers about 550 kanji) rely on "brute force" memorization of largely unrelated kanji compounds which makes it very hard, even with a good dictionary, to learn to make sense of kanji compounds one has never seen before. I'm probably more determined to read Japanese than most, but brute force just isn't remotely time-efficient and it certainly is no fun.
This book (a very big pedagogical improvement over its predecessor by the same authors "Reading Technical Japanese") teaches you to recognize the building blocks, much as if you were expanding your English vocabulary by learning common Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes for English words. And this approach helps build vocabulary well beyond the target areas of math, physics, chemistry, and biology also--I found I could read geography, economics, etc far more easily. Reading unfamilar material can still be hard work, but this book is FAR more efficient and I think gives a greater insight into the language.
It also teaches characteristics of the written scientific language one doesn't pick up in classes on the spoken language.
I literally went from not being able to read a Japanese elementary school math or science book easily (even though I probably knew close to a 1000 general kanji before this book, there were gaps in crucial places that made science very frustrating) to being able to read some college-level science text books and regular technical trade journal after finishing this book. And I worked through this book in about a month--that's what I mean by efficient.
There was nothing quite like it for business and finance (a great problem) and I wish they would tackle that field as well, or that someone would follow their approach.