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eBook The Princess and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

eBook The Princess and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by Ronald Hingley,Anton Chekhov

  • ISBN: 0192837885
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Ronald Hingley,Anton Chekhov
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 11, 1999)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1395 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1697 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf azw doc
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 308

Description

But Anton Chekhov is surely one of the most gifted Russian writers, these short stories illustrate that point.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). But Anton Chekhov is surely one of the most gifted Russian writers, these short stories illustrate that point. One person found this helpful.

Items related to The Princess and Other Stories (Oxford World's. Translated with introduction and notes by Ronald Hingley, Emeritus Fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford.

Anton Chekhov The Princess and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics). ISBN 13: 9780192837882. The Princess and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics).

Anton Chekhov, Ronald Hingley. These stories are translated with an Introduction by Ronald Hingley. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Further Reading in Oxford World’s Classics. Anton Chekhov, Early Stories, trans. Patrick Miles and Harvey Pitcher. -The Princess and Other Stories, ed. and trans. -Five Plays, ed. -The Russian Master and Other Stories, ed. -The Steppe and Other Stories, ed. -Twelve Plays, ed. -Ward Number Six and Other Stories, ed.

A Woman's Kingdom and Other Stories, and The Princess and Other Stories.

Anton Chekhov was born in i860 in south Russia, the son of a poor grocer. He is the translator of four other volumes of Chekhov stories in the Oxford World's Classics: The Russian Master and Other Stories, The Steppe and Other Stories, A Woman's Kingdom and Other Stories, and The Princess and Other Stories. His translations of all Chekhov's drama will be found in two Oxford World's Classics volumes, Five Plays and Twelve Plays.

Anton Chekhov, Ronald Hingley (Translator). It is the first time I read Anton Chekhov and even read Russian Classic literature. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. This book is composed of 3 short stories representing 3 different stages in the life of the author.

These stories are translated with an Introduction by Ronald Hingley. by Chekhov, Anton Paperback. P&p: + eur . 1 p&p. 1 p&p by Chekhov, Anton Paperback.

About Anton Chekhov: One of Russia's greatest writers, Chekhov began his career writing jokes and anecdotes for . I am particularly indebted to Edgar H. Lehrman's A Handbook to 86 of Chekhov's Stories and Ronald Hingley's notes in the Oxford Chekhov (Volumes 4-9).

About Anton Chekhov: One of Russia's greatest writers, Chekhov began his career writing jokes and anecdotes for popular magazines to support himself while he studied to become a doctor. Between 1888 and his death he single-handedly revolutionized both the drama and the short story. Near the end of his life he married an actress, Olga Knipper. A complete list of Constance Garnett's translations of Russian literature is here. Oxford World's Classics. Country of Publication. Translated by. Ronald Hingley. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful tes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. Short Stories & Fiction Anthologies.

Dr. Michael Ivanovich's pent-up fury with the unwelcome philanthropy of Princess Vera finds a long-awaited vent when he encounters her one evening in the garden of a monastery she has honoured with a visit. Throwing caution and class protocol to the winds, he accuses her of monstrous interference in others' lives, to nobody's good but her own . . .A doctor himself, Chekhov was acutely observant of Russian society in all its aspects of sickness, both physical and moral. The question for him as a writer was whether to moralize - to attempt to reform - or to entertain. It was a question which is implicitly answered by the stories themselves. They offer no easy answers, but they pinpoint the anguish, tedium, or downright evil of his characters with an irony that makes them both poignant and truthful.