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eBook Indochina ePub

eBook Indochina ePub

by Ly Lan Dill-Klein,Pierre Brocheux

  • ISBN: 0520269748
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Ly Lan Dill-Klein,Pierre Brocheux
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (June 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 508
  • ePub book: 1493 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1889 kb
  • Other: azw doc doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 297

Description

Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hémery. Ly Lan Dill-Klein (Translator) Overall, this book is an excellent introduction to the century of French colonization in Indochina.

Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hémery. Ly Lan Dill-Klein (Translator). This makes the book an essential item for anyone with a serious interest in Indochina. Jul 03, 2018 Luke rated it really liked it. Shelves: empire, history, geo-asia-southeast, geo-france, temp-modern-late, comprehensive-exams. Overall, this book is an excellent introduction to the century of French colonization in Indochina. It's a must-read for anyone interested in Southeast Asia, or French colonialism more broadly.

Reading this book made me realize what kept Hanoi in the Second Indochina War for so long

ISBN-13: 978-0520269743. Reading this book made me realize what kept Hanoi in the Second Indochina War for so long. Reunification wasn't some abstract historical dream, or merely legalizing Vietnamese claims to lower Cambodia (Kampuchea Krom). For the North, it was a matter of life or death.

translated from the French by Ly Lan Dill-Klein. T Indochina %S An Ambiguous Colonization 1858-1954 %A Brocheux, Pierre %A Hémery, Daniel %M French %F Dill-Klein, Ly Lan %I University of California Press %D 2009 %O hardcover, notes, bibliography, index %G ISBN-13 9780520245396 %P 490pp.

Personal Name: Brocheux, Pierre. Uniform Title: Indochine. Download DOC book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Pierre Brocheux is Professor of Contemporary History at Université Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of Ho Chi Minh: A Biography and The MeKong Delta . Ly Lan Dill-Klein, Nora Taylor, Noémi Tousignant, Eric T. Jennings. Nora Taylor, Noémi Tousignant, Eric T.

Pierre Brocheux is Professor of Contemporary History at Université Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of Ho Chi Minh: A Biography and The MeKong Delta: Ecology, Economy and Revolution, 1860-1960. Daniel Hémery is Professor of Contemporary History at Université Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of In the Servitude of Power: Energy and Civilization through the Ages, among other books.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Ly Lan Dill Klein books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Notify me. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hemery, Ly Lan Dill-Klein. Unique in its wide-ranging attention to economic, social, intellectual, and cultural dimensions, it is the first book to treat Indochina's entire history from its inception in Cochinchina in 1858 to its crumbling at Dien Bien Ph in 1954 and on to decolonization.

Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hémery, Ly Lan Dill-Klein, Eric Jennings . Crise économique et société en Indochine française.

Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hémery, Ly Lan Dill-Klein, Eric Jennings, Nora Annesley Taylor, Noémi R. Tousignant. Quels ont ete les liens entre la crise economique de 1929 et le soulevement politique des annees 1930-1931 ?

Pierre Brocheux is Professor of Contemporary History at Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of Ho Chi Minh: A Biography and The MeKong Delta: Ecology, Economy and Revolution . Translated by. Ly LAN Dill-Klein. History: Specific Subjects.

Pierre Brocheux is Professor of Contemporary History at Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of Ho Chi Minh: A Biography and The MeKong Delta: Ecology, Economy and Revolution, 1860-1960. Daniel Hemery is Professor of Contemporary History at Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot and the author of In the Servitude of Power: Energy and Civilization through the Ages, among other books.

Indochina: An Ambiguous Colonization, 1858–1954. By Pierre Brocheux and Daniel Hémery. Translated by, Ly Lan DillKlein, with, Eric Jennings, Nora Taylor, and Noémi Tousignant. J. P. Daughton, "Pierre Brocheux, Daniel Hémery, Ly Lan Dill-Klein, Eric Jennings, Nora Taylor, Noémi Tousignant, Fredrik Logevall, and Christopher Goscha, ed. Indochina: An Ambiguous Colonization, 1858–1954," The Journal of Modern History 83, no. 4 (December 2011): 907-909.

Combining new approaches with a groundbreaking historical synthesis, this accessible work is the most thorough and up-to-date general history of French Indochina available in English. Unique in its wide-ranging attention to economic, social, intellectual, and cultural dimensions, it is the first book to treat Indochina's entire history from its inception in Cochinchina in 1858 to its crumbling at Dien Bien Ph in 1954 and on to decolonization. Basing their account on original research as well as on the most recent scholarship, Pierre Brocheux and Daniel Hémery tell this story from a perspective that is neither Eurocentric nor nationalistic but that carefully considers the positions of both the colonizers and the colonized. With this approach, they are able to move beyond descriptive history into a rich exploration of the ambiguities and complexities of the French colonial period in Indochina. Rich in themes and ideas, their account also sheds new light on the national histories of the emerging nation-states of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, making this book essential reading for students, scholars, and general readers interested in the region, in the Vietnam War, or in French imperialism, among other topics.Caption translations provided in part by Nina Fink.

Comments

Voodoozragore Voodoozragore
Final review: The average Vietnamese today has as much say in their present governance as they did as colonies and protectorates. And, they have a State directed economy similar to what they had under the Bank of Indochina, minus the currency manipulation to benefit foreign investors. My two minor gripes about Brocheux and Hemery's work is that they make no mention of either Henri Brunschwig's "Mythes et Realites de l'imperialisme colonial francais 1871-1914", which makes some judgments on how little the colonies benefitted France, or Maurice Rives and Eric Deroo's comments on the frustrated post-WWI expectations of Indochinese Great War veterans and war workers outlined in "Les Linh Tap: Histoire des militaires indochinois au service de la France (1859-1960)". I sincerely wish the authors had at least mentioned those works, if only to dismiss them. Still, I feel they deserve five stars.

This work definitely meets a need for an English history on the subject and I am grateful to both the authors and translators. The chapter on colonial capitalism and development still leaves me scratching my head in places, as do the intricacies of the Bank of Indochina. But I found the chapters on colonial society, cultural transformation, and the impasses of colonialism to more than make up for it. It is nice to have statistics showing that the French built far more schools than prisons, and that they never had any illusions of converting the Indochinese into Frenchmen and women, that they were interested in developing a Vietnamese middle class along with the institutions that would occupy and support it, and that they were concerned with public health. The were even steps taken to ameliorate labor abuses.

My take on the book remains that French colonialism per se was neither evil nor noble. It did contribute to Vietnam's development. And it put Vietnam, at least, on the road to modernization. What Brocheux and Hemery make absolutely clear, however, is that the French were merely providing structure and planning to a pre-existing economy whose epicenter was neither Hanoi nor Hue, but Saigon, the Mekong River Delta and Transbassac region. A region of tremendous cultural complexity whose rice exportation to overseas markets was largely in the hands of Chinese networks established by Ming Dynasty refugees, who purchased their rice from farmers working their own lands or share-croppers working others lands, the majority of whose owners were not French. This economic frontier not only created space for arriving Vietnamese settlers, but allowed the feeding of increasing populations in Central and North Vietnam to the point that certain regions became dangerously overpopulated. They underline that this increased rice production was not the result of better farming methods, but the conversion of virgin Delta into paddy lands. Add to this the medical advances in Indochina, which even after independence has left the names of Pasteur, Yersin, and Calmette on Saigon streets, and it was only a matter of time before Vietnam would have more people than it could afford to feed. Indeed, the alarm was even being sounded by Hue Court mandarins in the 1930s. But the 1930s were tough times for everyone so it is understandable that French officialdom in both Norodom Palace and the Champs-Élysées France failed to read the handwriting that colonialism's days were over while they still had the chance to assist the colonies and protectorates along those paths. By the time rubber prices 'slumped' (dropping 57.5% in four months) in 1928, it was too late.

Reading this book made me realize what kept Hanoi in the Second Indochina War for so long. Reunification wasn't some abstract historical dream, or merely legalizing Vietnamese claims to lower Cambodia (Kampuchea Krom). For the North, it was a matter of life or death. As long as the Mekong Delta's rice lay beyond their control, they would have to either buy rice on international markets at prices above what they could get the Mekong's for, or have to rely upon donations from China or India, who could experience rice problems of their own. And when shortages came, which past experience suggests was inevitable, they wouldn't have the French or Japanese to blame.

Shortcomings: I found that Chapter 8 (Decline and Fall of the French Empire) missed a few points. No mention is made of the Vietnamization of French elite forces which made the Paratroop units one quarter to one third Vietnamese in 1950, or of De Lattre's extending of that program by partnering future ARVN units with French counterpart units that effected even the Foreign Legion. The authors discuss the battles for Cao Bang (actually Colonial Route 4) and Dien Bien Phu, but are ignorant of the campaign for Hoa Binh which began with the French seizure of that town in November 1951, followed by battles along the lower Black River which the Viet Minh ultimately closed, followed by battles over Colonial Route 6, which required up to nineteen battalions to hold and keep open, followed by "Arc-en-ciel", the abandonment of Hoa Binh and the exact moment the French found themselves bottled up in the Red River Delta. Hoa Binh weas the turning point of the war, and these authors missed it. They are not the first, so their five stars remain.
Forcestalker Forcestalker
The book is very well written, and quite a bit more than I expected. It’s incredibly detailed, and almost scientific, with verbiage beyond a layperson’s scope.
Anarasida Anarasida
Very readable, probably because it originally was in French (my bias is that French authors usually are good writers).
Parts that I have read (for example: education system) give me a good impression and appear very didactic to me (in a good way, similar to French textbooks). I like the book and will certainly read more.
Andronrad Andronrad
once again no mention of the battles fought between the French and Vietminh. No route#4, no Donghe, No caobang and nothing about the destruction of mobile group 100. This book just talks politics.
Bukelv Bukelv
I am trying to get a better understanding of how the french colonization in Vietnam failed and then how the gullible USA under democrats and ineffective presidents like Truman and Johnson led us into a war of stupidity (please note I mean no disrespect for the American and allied soldier that followed orders and honorably carried out his duty). My disrespect is meant towards liberals and the stupid democrat presidents they elect and follow about like vermin minions. The shame about it is, Franklin Roosevelt, one of the few truly great democrat presidents, wanted an independent Vietnam, free from Japanese and French occupation after WWII. So if that is the historical case, why would the USA under Truman side with the treacherous french and allow for them to try and maintain Vietnam under their colonial rule? In this book you are going to get hundreds of boring pages of detailed information about french missions, governors, ministers and advisors (and frankly who gives a s*** about the french anyway) and very little about how the filthy french were able to subvert America's traitorous liberals and gain their support for the re-installment of enslaving the Vietnamese people. The two authors of this book did immense mundane research and wrote just as insipidly about what they discovered. Which in the end is nothing. There are much better books than this one - and if you don't believe me, well then I will gladly sell you my copy.
energy breath energy breath
An invaluable background to America's actions in Viet Nam. Makes clear that the roots of nationalism lie in France's attempt to colonize Indochina over a century. Very detailed, but worth the effort.