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eBook The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180 (The Routledge History of the Ancient World) ePub

eBook The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180 (The Routledge History of the Ancient World) ePub

by Martin Goodman

  • ISBN: 0415049709
  • Category: Humanities
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Martin Goodman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 30, 1997)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1687 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1160 kb
  • Other: txt azw mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 126

Description

Martin Goodman is positioned at the Oriental Institute, Oxford. Martin Goodman is a recognized specialist in the Ancient Roman period. This book is one of his best-to the point, well written readable by both academic and layman.

Martin Goodman is positioned at the Oriental Institute, Oxford. He has written numerous books, including The Ruling Class of Judaea (1987), State and Society in Roman Galilee (1983) and contributed to The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (1986). Its coverage is all embracing, and the organisation of sections provides an in depth coverage of all aspects of Roman society, trade, religion,and foreign policy Allan Leibler Jerusalem.

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The Roman World 44 BC – AD 180 deals with the transformation of the .

Martin Goodman examines the reliance of Roman emperors on a huge military establishment and the threat of force. This book provides a critical assessment of the significance of Roman rule for inhabitants of the empire, and introduces readers to many of the main issues currently faced by historians of the early empire.

The Roman World 44 BC-AD 180 explores the central period of the Roman empire from Julius Caesar to Marcus Aurelius. Goodman examines the Roman world from an unusual and illuminating angle, focusing on the perspective of its subject peoples and its fringe areas, rather than from the Emperor's household, thereby giving a balanced view of the Roman world in its entirety. Goodman outlines and discusses the major aspects of Roman rule and culture, as well as the marginal; the city state of Rome, politics, social and civic life and religion

In the century BC the Romans were the great nation that succeeded in conquering many countries. First time in 55 BC the Roman emperor Julius Caesar at the head of the army of 10 thousand soldiers went to the British Isles. But they couldn’t conquer Britain and occupy the island.

In the century BC the Romans were the great nation that succeeded in conquering many countries. The channel storms and the Celts possessing iron-weapon made them retreat. Next year Caesar repeated his invasion and succeeded.

Start reading The Roman World 44 BC-AD 180 on your Kindle in under a minute. The book starts off with a necessarily telescoped version of the major political and military happenings, then he provides chapters drilling down on the methods used to govern Rome, the provinces and the military and he does not neglect just how the locals resented or collaborated with their Roman masters.

Examining the Roman world from an unusual and illuminating angle, this volume explores the central period of the Roman empire . Roman World 44BC 180AD. Part of the Routledge History of the Ancient World Series).

Examining the Roman world from an unusual and illuminating angle, this volume explores the central period of the Roman empire from Julius Caesar to Marcus Aurelius.

Routledge History of the Ancient World). The book traces the impact of imperial politics on life in the city of Rome itself and in the rest of the empire, arguing that, despite long periods of apparent peace, this was a society.

Find all the study resources for The Roman World 44 Bc-Ad 180 by Martin Goodman. The Roman World 44 Bc-Ad 180. Documents.

The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180 offers a stimulating and provocative addition to the study of the . Examining the Roman world from an unusual and illuminating angle, this volume explores the central period of the Roman empire from Julius Caesar to Marcus Aurelius.

The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180 offers a stimulating and provocative addition to the study of the Roman world in this period, which will be of vital interest to anyone concerned with the origins of Western civilization. Martin Goodman focuses on the perspective of its peoples and its fringe areas, rather than from the Emperor's household, giving a balanced view of the Roman world in its entirety.

Examining the Roman world from an unusual and illuminating angle, this volume explores the central period of the Roman empire from Julius Caesar to Marcus Aurelius.

Martin Goodmanfocuses on the perspective of its peoples and its fringe areas, rather than from the Emperor's household, giving a balanced view of the Roman world in its entirety.Goodman outlines and discusses the major aspects of Roman rule and culture, as well as the marginal; the city state of Rome, politics, social and civic life, and religion.

The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180 offers a stimulating and provocative addition to the study of the Roman world in this period, which will be of vital interest to anyone concerned with the origins of Western civilization.

Comments

Kesalard Kesalard
Martin Goodman is a recognized specialist in the Ancient Roman period. This book is one of his best--to the point, well written readable by both academic and layman.
Its coverage is all embracing, and the organisation of sections provides an in depth coverage of all aspects of Roman society, trade, religion,and foreign policy
Allan Leibler
Jerusalem
Snake Rocking Snake Rocking
Excellent.
Alsalar Alsalar
Exellent resource for beginning students!
Jugami Jugami
A good survey of the Roman 1st and 2nd centuries.
Endieyab Endieyab
The book is good if you are only looking for a summary of the Roman economy, military, religions, etc. To get a better overall view of Roman, or any other Western history, though, I highly recommend the various collaboration efforts of Professor John Reich.
Malanim Malanim
This is an amazing book, but you may want to familiarize yourself with Roman government and geography of the Mediterranean world before you get started, but after reading this one, you will probably be able to plow through Gibbons Decline and Fall with no problem and also know many more things that Gibbon knew. Let me just say this, if you are familiar with Gibbon, then you'll have no problem with reading Goodman and getting what he's talking about. For somebody just learning about the Roman Empire, this is not the first book to pick up on the subject.
The book starts off with a necessarily telescoped version of the major political and military happenings, then he provides chapters drilling down on the methods used to govern Rome, the provinces and the military and he does not neglect just how the locals resented or collaborated with their Roman masters. The overall flavor Goodman gives you is that the Roman Empire was a massive congery of ad hoc decisions that seemed to work at the time they were implemented with no planning for other contingencies, and this is a major difference between government in antiquity and modernity. Such a lack of planning was only ripe for disaster, but that is handled in the sequel: David Potter's The Roman Empire at Bay, AD 180-395 (The Routledge History of the Ancient World).
Another interesting thought Goodman makes clear is that while the Roman Empire was indeed a military dictatorship cloaked in the finery of a republic, it was certainly not a police state nor a totalitarian regime nor did it have the ability nor the will to be either.
Goodman then surveys the various territories of the empire and how they lived under Roman hegemony.
Goodman doesn't seem to miss any angle and there is much social history in this volume as well as the typical Classicist material from senatorially-biased primary sources (I'm talking to you Cassius Dio, Herodian and Historia Augusta authors!). But this is college-level material and bursting with new finds and conclusions based on the most recent scholarship, but Goodman does not skimp on primary sources either. I was assigned this book for a university undergrad class on the Roman Empire in the 2nd Century whose name is the same as this review and this is absolutely the best text the instructor could find at this size and price.
Vosho Vosho
Historiography is tricky. Pure narrative history tends to be a bit shallow and to conceal a great deal of interpretation under the surface, despite looking like a "factual" account. Thematic history, which has been popular for decades, tends to be inaccessible to the less advanced, as well as challenging to those in need of a review of the "basics" to appreciate the era better. So, with a book I recently read from the Oxford Shorter History of Europe, I had to go to the timeline in the back repeatedly, as well look up a few things in other books, to keep the basic historical framework in mind, so that I could appreciate the thematic discussions.

One can see how often people complain on Amazon about the inaccessibility of what they thought were more basic overviews of a given era. Martin Goodman found a great solution to this problem.

After a brief introduction on the nature of the sources, the reader gets about 70 pages of narrative history. It's fast, but well-organized, and situates the reader nicely. The account also introduces many major themes to be discussed later, as well as preparing the reader to reconsider the era by geographic units. Thereafter, a thematic section discusses economy, culture, the emperor, etc., characterizing the entity whose development had been described previously in terms of politics, warfare, and organization. Now that the Early Empire has been described in such detail, the next section breaks down the members of this state by class, ethnicity, gender, and geography and examines in what manner each group participated in, benefited or suffered from, accepted or did not accept this state and the overarching culture. The final section tackles religion, taking as its starting point the recurring theme of the cult of the emperor and pivoting around that to characterize "pagans" vs. Christian vs. Jews.

The Routledge History of the Ancient World includes many good volumes, but they are not all as well executed as Goodman. He's found a way to present the material that is accessible and informative without writing something which looks, like the Blackwell History of the Ancient World series, like a junior-college textbook.
This book was easy to read and to follow, had a number of helpful illustration and provided an fair amount of information pertaining to the foundation of the Empire and the running of both Rome and the provinces. While this book would be excellent for novices in the field of Roman antiquity, it was not an adequate read for any student of the ancient world. The lives of emperors were summed up in a few pages (usually around 2-5, some as short as 1/2 of a page), the governing of the country was presented in a superficial manner, and the general history was bland and without depth. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn the 'basics' of the Roman Empire, however, more serious scholars should look elsewhere.