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eBook The Fats of Life: Essential Fatty Acids in Health and Disease ePub

eBook The Fats of Life: Essential Fatty Acids in Health and Disease ePub

by Glen D. Lawrence

  • ISBN: 081354677X
  • Category: Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Glen D. Lawrence
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press; None ed. edition (February 4, 2010)
  • Pages: 296
  • ePub book: 1650 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1829 kb
  • Other: rtf docx mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 647

Description

The Fats of Life delineates the importance of essential fatty acids, with a focus on distinctions between .

The Fats of Life delineates the importance of essential fatty acids, with a focus on distinctions between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid variants. Glen D. Lawrence addresses in detail the capacity for polyunsaturated fatty acids to influence asthma, atherosclerosis, heart disease, inflammation, cancer, and immunity.

Chemical names appear on every nutrition label. But, just what do these terms mean in health and disease?The Fats of Life delineates the importance of essential fatty acids, with a focus on distinctions between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid variants.

In the Fats of Life, a recent book by Professor Glen Lawrence of Long Island University, we learn the .

In the Fats of Life, a recent book by Professor Glen Lawrence of Long Island University, we learn the biochemical role that fats play in our well-being, as well as some of the many reasons that Americans have been gulled into thinking that because all fats are bad, anything labeled "low fat" may be consumed in vast quantities with no harm. Overall, this book tells you precisely how and why various fatty acids affect our metabolism and why some fatty acids are much, much better than others, and that failing to observe that can be a matter of life and death. 12 people found this helpful.

The Fats of Life book. The Fats of Life: Essential Fatty Acids in Health and Disease. by. Lawrence. Chemical names appear on every nutrition label.

The Fats of Life delineates the importance of essential fatty acids, with a focus on distinctions between omega-3 and .

Mobile version (beta). Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

These essential fatty acids (EFAs) are based on linoleic acid (omega-6 . Alpha linolenic acid is the principal essential fatty acid in the omega-3 family and linoleic. acid takes the lead in the omega-6 series.

These essential fatty acids (EFAs) are based on linoleic acid (omega-6 group) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3 group). We need both groups of essential fatty acids to survive. For various reasons EFA deficiency is common in the general population, as is a disproportionate intake of omega-6 fatty acids over omega-3 fatty acids. diseases, provide a foundation for optimal health, and improve body composition, and. mental and physical performance. In a healthy body with sound nutrition, various.

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Chemical names appear on every nutrition label.

Pages: 297. Format: PDF.

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Omega-3s, trans-fats, polyunsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acidùresearch facts about fatty acids and their relationship to heart disease and atherosclerosis, obesity, cancer, and neurological disorders abound. Chemical names appear on every nutrition label. But, just what do these terms mean in health and disease?

The Fats of Life delineates the importance of essential fatty acids, with a focus on distinctions between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid variants. The chemical and biochemical characteristics of these fatty acids and their metabolism to a vast array of potent bioactive messengers are described in the context of their potential effects on general health and impact on various diseases and neurological disorders. Glen D. Lawrence addresses in detail the capacity for polyunsaturated fatty acids to influence asthma, atherosclerosis, heart disease, inflammation, cancer, and immunity. Lawrence makes clear that our understanding of the biochemical and physiological effects of dietary fats has advanced tremendously as a result of careful research, but he also stresses that this knowledge has not easily translated into sound dietary recommendations.

Comments

Iriar Iriar
Excellent text for review of dietary fat composition and nutritional value.
funike funike
We know that we eat far too much sugar, salt, and fat as
fuel for our bodies and we pay for this excess at the pump.
Not the gas pump, the slightest price increase for a gallon
of gasoline becomes a headline and we protest. But the pump
needed daily, our heart, is neglected and forced to pump a
toxic brew of chemical additives in the form of dietary
fats, et., along with other nutrients required for life. In
the Fats of Life, a recent book by Professor Glen Lawrence
of Long Island University, we learn the biochemical role
that fats play in our well-being, as well as some of the
many reasons that Americans have been gulled into thinking
that because all fats are bad, anything labeled "low fat"
may be consumed in vast quantities with no harm. The Fats
of Life distinguishes the essential fatty acids required for
a healthy diet and from the nonessential fatty acids that,
for example, when combined in processed foods with excess
salt and sugar, produce toxic chemicals that damage the
pancreas, liver, and kidneys.

The research deftly summarizes many of the recent studies on
the disastrous role that polyunsaturated fatty acids play in
heart disease, obesity, cancer and diabetes. While there are
pages devoted to biochemical descriptions of metabolic
processes, the text should be comprehensible to anyone with
a reasonable science background or an abiding interest in
nutrition science. One great strength to the book is that

Lawrence brings a technical discussion to practical
applications and declares unequivocally what you should seek
in your diet and what you should avoid. Moreover, exhaustive
detail is devoted to explaining precisely how our metabolism
uses fatty acids to our benefit and how different oils
(e.g., canola,corn, palm, etc.) contain varying proportions
of mono saturated, polyunsaturated, and saturated fats and
how they help or harm our vital organs.
Moreover, we are probably consuming too much omega-6 based
fatty acids relative to the neglected role that omega 3
fatty acids play in healthy diets.

Polyunsaturated oils may be needed for what ails us but, as
the dose makes the poison, our digestive systems get too
much of too many apparently good things and the excess
eventually makes us sick . What precisely we should eat more
of and why is often missing in such discussions but Lawrence
devotes an entire chapter on dietary choices that will guide
your selection of unprocessed whole foods whenever you have
a choice, as processed foods use too much salt, preservatives and sugar.

Overall, this book tells you
precisely how and why various fatty acids affect our
metabolism and why some fatty acids are much, much better
than others, and that failing to observe that can be a
matter of life and death.