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eBook Every Second Counts: The Race to Transplant the First Human Heart ePub

eBook Every Second Counts: The Race to Transplant the First Human Heart ePub

by Donald McRae

  • ISBN: 0425215229
  • Category: Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Donald McRae
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berkley (August 7, 2007)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1438 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1984 kb
  • Other: txt lit txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 933

Description

Includes bibliographical references (p. -342) and index. The true story of four men locked in a race to transplant the first human heart-a tale of surgical daring, unyielding ambition, and scientific adventure.

Includes bibliographical references (p. Many remember the beaming face of South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard after he performed the first human heart transplant and captured the world's imagination. It was a stunning achievement, but he was not alone. In truth it was a four-way race, a fierce struggle fraught with passionate rivalry.

In the tradition of The Right Stuff comes the true story of four men locked in a race to transplant the first human heart-a riveting .

In the tradition of The Right Stuff comes the true story of four men locked in a race to transplant the first human heart-a riveting tale of surgical daring, unyielding ambition, and scientific adventure. Many people remember the beaming face of Christiaan Barnard, the South African surgeon, after he performed the first human heart transplant, and captured the world's imagination. Each had spent years perfecting techniques that would lead to a successful heart transplant; each had monitored his chosen patient's condition, watching the clock, hoping a donor would be found in time. Some of these men were friends; others were enemies.

Donald McRae describes four physicians working diligently toward the first human heart transplant. Every second counts" is a good story about the medical pioneers who invented heart surgery procedures and devices that are commonplace today. The efforts, creativity, egos and motivations of these doctors lay the background to this fascinating medical story. Most telling, is the fight that the earliest practitioners had to undergo to get the US laws that defined when death occurs changed.

Approximately 3,500 heart transplants are performed every year in the world, more than half of which occur in the .

Approximately 3,500 heart transplants are performed every year in the world, more than half of which occur in the US. Post-operation survival periods average 15 years. Heart transplantation is not considered to be a cure for heart disease; with that being said, it still is a life-saving treatment intended to improve the quality, and hopefully also the overall. a b Every Second Counts: The Race to Transplant the First Human Heart, Donald McRae, New York: Penguin (Berkley/Putnam), 2006, Ch. 7 "Mississippi Gambling", pages 123-127. This source states the heart beat for approximately one hour.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The dramatic race to transplant the first human heart spanned two years, three continents and five cities against a backdrop of searing tension, scientific brilliance, ethical controversy, racial strife and emotional turmoil.

He had a brilliance about him, says Donald McRae, author of the book Every Second Counts: The Race to. .For much of 1966 and 1967, the world was anticipating that the first heart transplant could happen at any moment.

He had a brilliance about him, says Donald McRae, author of the book Every Second Counts: The Race to Transplant the First Human Heart. It takes a bold and audacious person to leap into the dark. Building a Machine Heart. In fact, several times Lower and Shumway were presented with opportunities, but fears about weak recipients or high-risk rejections delayed the procedures. But, then he shocked them al.

Many remember the proudly beaming face of South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard after he performed the first human heart transplant. But he was not alone in his quest. In truth it was a fourway race, a fierce struggle fraught with passionate rivalry

Many remember the proudly beaming face of South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard after he performed the first human heart transplant. In truth it was a fourway race, a fierce struggle fraught with passionate rivalry. Three other surgeons were giants in the field, and by early December 1967 all were poised to make medical history. Each had spent years perfecting his techniques; each monitored his chosen patient's condition, watching the clock, hoping a donor would be found in time

In the tradition of The Right Stuff comes the true story of four men locked in a race to transplant the first human heart-a riveting tale of surgical daring,.

In the tradition of The Right Stuff comes the true story of four men locked in a race to transplant the first human heart-a riveting tale of surgical daring,. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

368 pages, no illustrations.

The dramatic race to transplant the first human heart spanned two years, three continents and five cities against a backdrop of searing tension, scientific brilliance, ethical controversy, racial strife and emotional turmoil. EVERY SECOND COUNTS is the story of Chris Barnard and his gripping race against four extraordinary men to conquer the greatest of medical challenges. It is also a deeply personal biography of a Casanova surgeon with film-star looks, whose tortured private life was played out on the most public of stages. 368 pages, no illustrations.

The pioneers: Surgeons who missed out on the glory. While history focuses on the handsome Afrikaner, Christiaan Barnard, it has largely been forgotten that three American surgeons - Norman Shumway, Richard Lower and Adrian Kantrowitz - were all on the brink of medical greatness. Eighteen months before Barnard carried out the first human heart transplant, Kantrowitz attempted to save a baby while making history at Maimondies hospital in Brooklyn on June 29 1966

Documents the story of the first human heart transplant and the competition between four top surgeons to master the necessary techniques to make heart transplants possible, in an account that describes the difficult challenges that were faced by each doctor. Reprint.

Comments

Dori Dori
A medical history page turner plus a review of the interwining of technology and ethics. I was a medical student when MCV's kidney transplant pioneer David Hume tragically flew his plane into the mountainside. And I was still in Richmond when Dick Lower was doing heart transplants. I laughed out loud reading the description of definition-of-death plaintiff attorney Doug Wilder as verbose and ambitious. He was both, all the way to the Governor's mansion. These details and the rightly deserved disdain of Barnard made this book alive on a personal, professional, and historical level. Well done.
Cildorais Cildorais
I am a heart transplant survivor. I absolutely loved reading about the early days of this incredible medical miracle called organ transplants. Very well written and accessible even for those us who don't understand medical jargon.
Kikora Kikora
Many of us remember the news of the first heart transplant, done, of all places, in South Africa. But only those on the inside knew that several physicians were on the brink of reaching this medical mile stone. Donald McRae describes four physicians working diligently toward the first human heart transplant. The efforts, creativity, egos and motivations of these doctors lay the background to this fascinating medical story. It reads like a medical research timeline, interwoven with facts and factoids about the major players involved.

The descriptions of the doctors' various situations will surely appeal to a wide audience -- interesting to medical types as well as lay people. I was impressed by the degree of research and referencing of this book -- without giving it the flavor of an academic publication. I could not put the book down.
Gandree Gandree
Great book. I worked with Dr Lower for many years and the book gives great and thorough account. of the golden age of cardiac surgery and some of the great geniuses.
Pipet Pipet
THIS IS A GREAT BOOK AND VERY ACCURATE ABOUT THE THINGS THAT HAPPENED BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE FIRST HUMAN HEART TRANSPLANT TOOK PLACE. THE BOOK WAS VERY WELL RESEARCHED PRIOR TO THE WRITING BY DONALD McRAE. I THINK HE WAS VERY FAIR IN HIS APPROACH TO ALL PHASES OF THE BOOK. I WAS DR. RICHARD LOWER'S TECHNICIAN (PERFUSIONIST) FROM 1963 AT STANFORD UNTIL 1989 AT MCV IN VA. I WAS INVOLVED IN ALL HIS HEART TRANSPLANTS SO I CAN ATTEST TO THE AUTHENTICITY OF WHAT MR. McRAE WROTE ABOUT DR.'S SHUMWAY, LOWER, AND BARNARD IN THE BOOK. I BELIEVE IT TO BE THE BEST BOOK THAT HAS BEEN WRITTEN ABOUT THOSE EARLY DAYS OF THE HEART TRANSPLANT BUSINESS.
LANIER ALLEN, RETIRED CCP & RETIRED CHIEF OF PERFUSION AT MCV HOSPITAL, RICHMOND, VA
Naktilar Naktilar
Fascinating recount of remarkable events and challenges in the research and development of heart transplantation as a clinical treatment.
Kulabandis Kulabandis
"Every second counts" is a good story about the medical pioneers who invented heart surgery procedures and devices that are commonplace today. Most telling, is the fight that the earliest practitioners had to undergo to get the US laws that defined when death occurs changed. Until brain death rather than heart death became the law, organ donation of all kinds we hampered ... which is why a South African surgeon was able to perform the first human heart transplant. A fun and informative read.
A fascinating description of the pioneers of open heart surgery leading to the worlds first heart transplant. I was a fifth year medical student and may be biased as I was there at the time but this is the right stuff of medicine. Pioneers such as Barnard,Shumway,Lillihei live again in the tense atmosphere of stopping a heart from beating for what seems like an eternity and then restarting it again.
It is accurate down to the fine minutia in the animal lab next to the morgue at the medical school of the University of Cape Town.
A must read!!