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eBook From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) ePub

eBook From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology (Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution) ePub

by William J. Sutherland

  • ISBN: 0198549105
  • Category: Science and Mathematics
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: William J. Sutherland
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1314 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1454 kb
  • Other: azw doc lit azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 452

Description

From Individual Behaviour. has been added to your Basket. Population dynamics and animal behaviour are two subjects which have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related

From Individual Behaviour. Population dynamics and animal behaviour are two subjects which have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related. This book provides a novel framework for combining these two subjects and then shows how to consider a range of conservation issues.

William J. Sutherland. Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution. Population dynamics and animal behaviour are two subjects which have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related

William J. From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology. William J. Sutherland

Start by marking From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology as Want to Read . Population dynamics and animal behaviour are two subjects that have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related.

Start by marking From Individual Behaviour to Population Ecology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

This book provides a novel framework for combining these two subjects and . Publisher:Oxford University Press, Incorporated.

book by William J. This book provides a novel framework for combining these two subjects and considers a range of conservation issues.

Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution. By (author) William J.

From individual to population ecology. Oxford University Press, 1996. Consequences of the Allee effect for behaviour, ecology and conservation. PA Stephens, WJ Sutherland. Trends in ecology & evolution 14 (10), 401-405, 1999.

The development of population ecology owes much to demography and actuarial life tables. Population ecology is important in conservation biology, especially in the development of population viability analysis (PVA) which makes it possible to predict. Population ecology is important in conservation biology, especially in the development of population viability analysis (PVA) which makes it possible to predict the long-term probability of a species persisting in a given habitat patch. Although population ecology is a subfield of biology, it provides interesting problems for mathematicians and statisticians who work in population dynamics.

Ecology and Evolution gives prompt and equal consideration to papers reporting theoretical, experimental .

All Ecology and Evolution articles are published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

All students of ecology, evolution, and animal behavior will want to be familiar with this work, which addresses the wider issues of the influence of ecology on mating systems and the evolutionary significance of conflict within and between species. This is the third volume in the Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution, and the first in this series to address behavioral ecology. Oxford University Press, Incorporated.

Population dynamics and animal behavior are two subjects which have developed almost independently, despite widespread acceptance of the idea that they must be related. This book provides a novel framework for combining these two subjects and considers a range of conservation issues. The author suggests how to extrapolate from behavioral interactions to population-level phenomena; each chapter presents a combination of theory and empirical examples, including modelling techniques. Students and researchers in animal behavior, population ecology, and conservation biology will welcome this new approach.