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eBook Five Kingdoms, 3rd Edition: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life On Earth ePub

eBook Five Kingdoms, 3rd Edition: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life On Earth ePub

by Karlene V. Schwartz,Lynn Margulis

  • ISBN: 0805072527
  • Category: Science and Mathematics
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Karlene V. Schwartz,Lynn Margulis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; 3rd edition (December 15, 1997)
  • Pages: 544
  • ePub book: 1485 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1155 kb
  • Other: mobi azw azw txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 916

Description

They list 27 phyla with diagrams exhibiting a range of bizarre structures and life cycles. Another noteworthy entry is Trichoplax adhaerens.

Her five kingdoms can be interpreted as six kingdoms (commonly the Archaea are separated from the other bacteria to form the sixth kingdom), or as over 30 kingdoms (if Carl Woese's system is used. For practical purposes the six kingdom's concept seems reasonable to me, although specialists may prefer a more complex grouping and several "domains" of life. They list 27 phyla with diagrams exhibiting a range of bizarre structures and life cycles. Remember the name of this creature - "it is the simplest of animals.

Lynn Margulis, Michael J. Chapman. Photographs, some by Karlene Schwartz, drawings and brief essays describe representative members of each phylum. It should be of interest to students of biology, botany, zoology and other life sciences as well as professionals.

Developed after consultation with specialists, this modern classification scheme is consistent both with the fossil record and with recent molecular, morphological and metabolic data. Generously illustrated, now in full color, Kingdoms and Domains is remarkably easy to read

Lynn Margulis, Karlene V. Schwartz. GENERIC RAW BOOK ZIP download.

Lynn Margulis, Karlene V.

by Lynn Margulis (Author), Karlene V. Schwartz (Author) . That said, "Five Kingdoms" is a delight to read and a great introduction to the huge diversity of earth's complex biota

by Lynn Margulis (Author), Karlene V. Schwartz (Author), Steven Jay Gould (Foreword) & 0 more. That said, "Five Kingdoms" is a delight to read and a great introduction to the huge diversity of earth's complex biota. Each group is discussed in detail and a sampling of genera listed. Good black and white photographs and drawings illustrate each group discussed.

Mostly the data of the books and covers were damaged so many books . Generously illustrated, now in full color, Kingdoms and Domains is remarkably easy to read.

Generously illustrated, now in full color, Kingdoms and Domains is remarkably easy to read.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Five Kingdoms : An Illustrated Guide to. .Lynn Margulis, Karlene V. Illustrated Paperback Books Price Guide. Lc Classification Number. Illustrated Ecology Environment, Nature & Earth Paperback Books. Illustrated Birds Environment, Nature & Earth Paperback Books. Environment, Nature & Earth Marine Life Paperback Books.

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Lynn Margulis, one of the most brilliant biologists of the 20th century, and her colleague. An all-inclusive catalogue of the world's living diversity, Five Kingdoms defines and describes the major divisions of nature's five great kingdoms-bacteria, protoctists, animals, fungi, and plants-using a modern classification scheme that is consistent with both the fossil record and molecular data.

Five Kingdoms book This book is an illustrated taxonomy of life on the planet and, as such, well produced and illustrated.

New ideas on molecular systematics, symbiogenisis, and the place of microbes in the evolution of life. This book is an illustrated taxonomy of life on the planet and, as such, well produced and illustrated. Taxonomy is always developing as new discoveries come to light - new fossils, new DNA analyses - so some might argue for six kingdoms while others might have niggles with specific classifications.

Book by Margulis, Lynn, Schwartz, Karlene V.

Comments

Nuadora Nuadora
While the higher classification of life seems sometimes to be undergoing almost monthly changes, Lynne Margulis et al. "Five Kingdoms," third edition is still the most detailed survey of the earth's biota. Her five kingdoms can be interpreted as six kingdoms (commonly the Archaea are separated from the other bacteria to form the sixth kingdom), or as over 30 kingdoms (if Carl Woese's system is used.) For practical purposes the six kingdom's concept seems reasonable to me, although specialists may prefer a more complex grouping and several "domains" of life.

That said, "Five Kingdoms" is a delight to read and a great introduction to the huge diversity of earth's complex biota. Each group is discussed in detail and a sampling of genera listed. Good black and white photographs and drawings illustrate each group discussed.

If you prefer the six kingdoms concept you can just split out the Archaea, but the other kingdoms are unchanged. If you like the multiple kingdoms concept, this is best discussed in Tudge's 2000 book "The Variety of Life." As can be readily seen, higher classification of living things is difficult primarily because of the complexity of mostly microscopic organisms and thus the general public will probably find the discussions tough going. The amateur and professional biologist, as well as the well-read layman, will be fascinated because the organisms, from radiolarians to elephants and diatoms to redwoods are so interesting in themselves.

In general I recommend this book to those who are interested in any phase of the biodiversity on our planet.
LONUDOG LONUDOG
Great.
Yozshujinn Yozshujinn
My husband is totally loving the book, he is an education person and this is very educational for him, he even trys to get others
interested..
Zahisan Zahisan
Excellent product. Thanks!
Yojin Yojin
Great condition! Exceeded educational expectations!
Monn Monn
excellent condition
Little Devil Little Devil
I bought this book based on ratings because I needed a book to help me classify animals into their correct group. This book is so boring and very confusing. The pictures of the organisims are nice but the way the book is presented in plain english "sucks".
This book is a stunning compendium of the range of life forms found on our planet. Margulis and Schwartz describe it as "a catalog of the world's living diversity." It is a vividly descriptive assortment of selected examples from the Five Kingdoms of life formulated by R.H. Whittiker. The authors stress how much new knowledge, particularly in the study of unicellular life forms, has been gained in recent years. They explain how classification identifies organisms and show how modern techniques have led to the expansion of life's kingdoms from two to five. A description of prokaryotes and eucaryotes is given, followed by the body of 92 phyla descriptions. The book is arranged to be either studied as a reference or browsed as an introduction to biological forms. Each entry is carefully organized with the type of information [environment, measurement scales, diagrams] in a consistent location.
However, this is more than simply a collection of illustrative examples of various organisms. The most fascinating chapter relates the authors' proposal to modify one of the standard classifications of life - the Protoctists, replacing Whittiker's Protists. "The Kingdom Protoctista is defined by exclusion," they state. "Its members are neither animals, plants, fungi nor procaryotes." Their common characteristics are nucleated cells, some kind of flagellum and live in an oxygenated atmosphere [unlike many unicellular forms which cannot tolerate oxygen. Their argument contends that many multicellular forms are more
directly related to these unicellular forms than they are to other multi-celled organisms. The new classification "also solves the problem of blurred boundaries that arises if the unicellular organisms are assigned to the multicellular kingdoms." They list 27 phyla [of 36 total]with diagrams exhibiting a range of bizarre structures and life cycles.
Another noteworthy entry is Trichoplax adhaerens. Remember the name of this creature - "it is the simplest of animals." Composed of but a few thousand cells, it is a dull gray body just visible to the unaided eye. In looking at the photo and diagram of this creature invokes a sense of wonder - this is, after all, a distance relative living in the nearest aquarium with the shad.
This book is a delight to browse following one of the authors' intents. Their second purpose, using this book as a reference, is even more admirably met. Clear photographs coupled with excellent diagrams, including typical environments of the selected specimens, add visual support to a readable text base. Any reader interested in the way life is structured and seeking insights into evolutionary development would do well to consider this book. It's not an academic text, but conveys a wealth of meaningful information.