cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Functional Consequences of Biodiversity: Empirical Progress and Theoretical Extensions.
eBook The Functional Consequences of Biodiversity: Empirical Progress and Theoretical Extensions. ePub

eBook The Functional Consequences of Biodiversity: Empirical Progress and Theoretical Extensions. ePub

by David Tilman,Ann P. Kinzig,Stephen Pacala

  • ISBN: 0691088225
  • Category: Science and Mathematics
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: David Tilman,Ann P. Kinzig,Stephen Pacala
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; y First printing edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1465 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1147 kb
  • Other: azw rtf txt doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 319

Description

These experimental and theoretical analyses demonstrate that functioning usually increases with biodiversity . Ann P. Kinzig, Stephen Pacala, David Tilman, Princeton University Press.

These experimental and theoretical analyses demonstrate that functioning usually increases with biodiversity, but also reveals when and under what circumstances other relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning might occur. Does biodiversity influence how ecosystems function?

Ann P. Kinzig is Assistant Professor of Biology at Arizona State University. Stephen Pacala is Frederick D. Petrie Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University.

Ann P.

Pacala and David Tilman 151 Conclusions 165 PART 2 Theoretical Extensions Chapter 8. Introduction to Theory and the Common Ecosystem Model by Stephen Pacala and Ann P. Kinzig 169 The Common Ecosystem. Kinzig 169 The Common Ecosystem Model 171 Summary of the Basic Model 174 Chapter 9. Successional Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning by Ann P. Kinzig and Stephen Pacala 175 Introduction 175 The Successional Niche in a Simple

Personal Name: Kinzig, Ann P. (Ann Patricia). Personal Name: Pacala, Stephen W.

Personal Name: Kinzig, Ann P. Personal Name: Tilman, David, 1949-. Rubrics: Biodiversity Ecology. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Bank management.

The functional consequences of biodiversity: empirical progress and theoretical extensions. AP Kinzig, S Pacala, D Tilman. Princeton University Press, 2001. A new urban ecology: modeling human communities as integral parts of ecosystems poses special problems for the development and testing of ecological theory. JP Collins, A Kinzig, NB Grimm, WF Fagan, D Hope, J Wu, ET Borer. American scientist 88 (5), 416-425, 2000.

The idea of bringing to bear a standardized and commonly accepted ecosystem function model on the biodiversity question is ingenious and of great value. -Peter Kareiva, Lead Scientist, The Nature Conservancy.

Princeton (New Jersey): Princeton University Press. xxvi + 365 p; il. index. ISBN: 0–691–08821–7 (hc); 0–691–08822–5 (pb). Animal & Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

The functional consequences of biodiversity : empirical progress and theoretical extensions, Ann P. Kinzig .

The scale-dependent results are consistent with theoretical models in which sampling effects and niche complementarity dominate at small scales, while environmental gradients drive patterns at large scales. Our study shows that the relationship of tree species richness with biomass and productivity changes qualitatively when moving from scales typical of forest surveys (. 4 ha) to slightly larger scales (. 5 and 1 ha).

Empirical progress and theoretical extensions In: Kinzig A, Tilman D, Pacala S (eds) Functional consequences of biodiversity: experimental progress and theoretical extensions.

Empirical progress and theoretical extensions. Princeton Univ Press, Princeton, pp 213–245Google Scholar. In: Kinzig A, Tilman D, Pacala S (eds) Functional consequences of biodiversity: experimental progress and theoretical extensions. Princeton Univ Press, Princeton, pp 120–150Google Scholar. Smith SE, Read DJ (1997) Mycorrhizal symbiosis.

Kinzig, Ann . Pacala, Stephen W. 2002. Successional biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Functional Consequences of Biodiversity: Empirical Progress and Theoretical Extensions. Princeton University Press. Kinzig, Ann . Pacala, Stephen . Tilman, David. The Functional Consequences of Biodiversity: Empirical Progress and Theoretical Extensions.

Does biodiversity influence how ecosystems function? Might diversity loss affect the ability of ecosystems to deliver services of benefit to humankind? Ecosystems provide food, fuel, fiber, and drinkable water, regulate local and regional climate, and recycle needed nutrients, among other things. An ecosyste's ability to sustain functioning may depend on the number of species residing in the ecosystem--its biological diversity--but this has been a controversial hypothesis. There are many unanswered questions about how and why changes in biodiversity could alter ecosystem functioning. This volume, written by top researchers, synthesizes empirical studies on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning and extends that knowledge using a novel and coordinated set of models and theoretical approaches.

These experimental and theoretical analyses demonstrate that functioning usually increases with biodiversity, but also reveals when and under what circumstances other relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning might occur. It also accounts for apparent changes in diversity-functioning relationships that emerge over time in disturbed ecosystems, thereby addressing a major controversy in the field. The volume concludes with a blueprint for moving beyond small-scale studies to regional ones--a move of enormous significance for policy and conservation but one that will entail tackling some of the most fundamental challenges in ecology.

In addition to the editors, the contributors are Juan Armesto, Claudia Neuhauser, Andy Hector, Clarence Lehman, Peter Kareiva, Sharon Lawler, Peter Chesson, Teri Balser, Mary K. Firestone, Robert Holt, Michel Loreau, Johannes Knops, David Wedin, Peter Reich, Shahid Naeem, Bernhard Schmid, Jasmin Joshi, and Felix Schläpfer.