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eBook Terrorism and International Law ePub

eBook Terrorism and International Law ePub

by Maurice Flory,Rosalyn Higgins

  • ISBN: 0415116066
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Maurice Flory,Rosalyn Higgins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge (January 24, 1997)
  • Pages: 396
  • ePub book: 1187 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1607 kb
  • Other: mobi doc lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 254

Description

Terrorism and International Law Hardcover – 2 Jan 1997. This book investigates the root of terrorism and the reasoning behind it, while exploring how the civilized world can deal with it within just and moral boundaries.

Terrorism and International Law Hardcover – 2 Jan 1997. The authors of the various chapters attempt to illuminate differing views about the reasoning behind such acts. However in most cases, the investigation is quickly halted and satisfied in putting the burden on the Western world.

Book, Online - Google Books. London ; New York : Routledge : LSE, 1997 xiii, 382 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.

Terrorism and international law. London ; New York : Routledge : LSE. MLA Citation. Australian/Harvard Citation. Book, Online - Google Books.

Maurice Flory Rosalyn Higgins3 de mayo de 2002.

Maurice Flory, Rosalyn Higgins. The proliferation in terrorist activity has provoked an increase in the body of law, both at national and international level, which has sought to counter and prevent it. The bodies involved in this process range from the UN Security Council to government legislatures. This book is the first to address, in one volume, the wide variety of responses to terrorism as they exist in both international and domestic contexts.

Rosalyn C. Higgins, Baroness Higgins, GBE, QC (born 2 June 1937, London) is a British former President of the International Court of Justice (ICJ)

Rosalyn C. Higgins, Baroness Higgins, GBE, QC (born 2 June 1937, London) is a British former President of the International Court of Justice (ICJ). She was the first female judge elected to the ICJ, and was elected President in 2006. Her term of office expired on 6 February 2009. She was succeeded as President by Judge Hisashi Owada, and Sir Christopher Greenwood was elected in her place as Judge in the International Court of Justice.

40 See Maurice Flory, International Law: Instruments to Combat Terrorism, in Terrorism and International Law 31, 31 (Rosalyn Higgins & Maurice Flory ed. 1997). Starke, The Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of Terrorism, 19 Brit. Int’l L. 214, 215 (1938).

Terrorism and International Law By Rosalyn Higgins; Maurice Flory Routledge, 1997. Terrorism: The Politics of Prosecution By Morris, Madeline Chicago Journal of International Law, Vol. 5, No. 2, Winter 2005. Identification of Potential Terrorism: The Problem and Implications for Law-Enforcement in Pakistan By Fasihuddin International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences, Vol. 3, No. 2, July-December 2008.

Terrorism and international law. Rosalyn Higgins, Maurice Flory

Terrorism and international law. Rosalyn Higgins, Maurice Flory. The bodies involved in thi. More). Le couple État-territoire en droit international contemporain.

In Terrorism and International Law Maurice Flory states that the of terrorism should result in the of repression by means of greater legal assistance among states: terrorist.

In Terrorism and International Law Maurice Flory states that the of terrorism should result in the of repression by means of greater legal assistance among states: terrorist attacks should be criminalized in every state and criminal procedures should be revised accordingly.

11 Judge Rosalyn Higgins, ‘The General International Law of Terrorism’ in Judge Rosalyn Higgins and Maurice Flory (eds), Terrorism and International Law (1997) 13, 14. 12 See Louis Rene Beres, ‘On International Law and Nuclear Terrorism’ (1994) 24 Georgia Journal o. . 12 See Louis Rene Beres, ‘On International Law and Nuclear Terrorism’ (1994) 24 Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law 1, 3. 13 See Yonah Alexander, ‘Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century: Threats and Responses’ (1999) 12 DePaul Business Law Journal 59, 92–4. Self-Defence and State-Sponsored Terrorism.

The proliferation in terrorist activity has provoked an increase in the body of law, both at national and international level, which has sought to counter and prevent it. The bodies involved in this process range from the UN Security Council to government legislatures. This book is the first to address, in one volume, the wide variety of responses to terrorism as they exist in both international and domestic contexts. It also represents the first ever comprehensive collection of documents referring to terrorism which are to be found in the laws of the UK and France as well as in international law.Terrorism and International Law comprises contributions by thirteen well-known authorities in the areas of international, French and UK law, and is divided into four main sections: international cooperation against terrorism, the French and British responses to terrorism, the limits of state action and a documentary supplement. The contributors have sought to show how international and domestic law can be used together to combat the multi-faceted problems which terrorism raises. The issue of human rights is also discussed with particular reference to the jurisprudence of the European Commission and Court of Human Rights. The fourth documentary section of the book provides coverage of international treaties, UN resolutions, UK and French legislation, case-law and official statements relating to terrorism.This book provides an invaluable source of commentary and reference material in the area of terrorism and international and domestic law which will be useful for practitioners, diplomats, students and teachers.

Comments

SadLendy SadLendy
I read this book for an undergrad philosophy course, and found it pretty worthless. The individual submissions tend towards repetition, with an over-emphasis on defining terrorism, and not much justification for the strategies they propose to combat it. Generally, however, the essays just don't cover much ground, and the discussion helps no one but professional philosophers. Any one with a practical interest in combating terrorism, be they military, political, or in any other field, would find the book unhelpful.
The Chomsky and Sterba submissions are interesting, but others, such as Philips', are just plain weird. Philips' solution to long-term terrorism is to give in to the demands of fundamentalists, and take our society backwards to meet theirs. It would be a scary thought if he could actually argue for it well. Teachers, please don't assign this in class, because in addition to the above mentioned problems, its also very boring.
Fearlesssinger Fearlesssinger
This book investigates the root of terrorism and the reasoning behind it, while exploring how the civilized world can deal with it within just and moral boundaries.
The authors of the various chapters attempt to illuminate differing views about the reasoning behind such acts. However in most cases, the investigation is quickly halted and satisfied in putting the burden on the Western world. In like manner, and in a fairly passive approach, the book downplays the significance of the religious roots that has been at the core of so many wars over the past 1400 years.
It is difficult to find common justice to deal with the terrorism problem on a global scale when the motivating force that initiates the problem is to the contrary of that justice.
Doukree Doukree
Anyone seeking a serious, intellectually grown-up exploration of this challenging topic will find Terrorism and International Justice to be a grave disappointment. Far from promoting dialogue and reflection, it is as though the editor, James Sterba, plugs his ears and chants the party line at the top of his lungs. While the contributions are by no means uniformly bad, the worst ones show a profound and pernicious disengagement from reality--including the reality of terrorism, the stakes involved, and the significance of how we react to it. Basically, the central (or most persistent) suggestion seems to boil down to this: As Americans, we should accept as legitimate every grievance (real and imagined) that Islamic terrorists have against us, as a means of seeking rapprochement with the Muslim world. Moreover, we should do so without in any way encouraging our would-be interlocutors to examine their own societies' contributions to the situations that fuel their anger towards us. Not that anyone ever actually asserts this explicitly, mind you: but there is no mistaking the tenor of what is said.