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eBook African Women's Report 2009: Measuring Gender Inequality in Africa: Experiences and Lessons from the African Gender and Development Index (Economic Commission for Africa) ePub

eBook African Women's Report 2009: Measuring Gender Inequality in Africa: Experiences and Lessons from the African Gender and Development Index (Economic Commission for Africa) ePub

by United Nations

  • ISBN: 9211251125
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: United Nations
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: United Nations (February 28, 2010)
  • Pages: 260
  • ePub book: 1885 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1562 kb
  • Other: doc mobi lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 680

Description

African Women’s Report 2009. Measuring Gender Inequality in Africa: Experiences and Lessons from the African Gender and Development Index. The African Gender and Development Index as a Tool.

African Women’s Report 2009.

PDF On Nov 1, 2017, Caroline Ngonze and others published African Gender and Development Index Regional Synthesis . Book · November 2017 with 190 Reads. How we measure 'reads'

Book · November 2017 with 190 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia : United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, 2009. This publication is based on the results of piloting the African Gender and Development Index (AGDI) in 12 African countries across the five subregions of the continent

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia : United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, 2009. Fiziksel Tanımlama: 1 online resource (xxiv, 234 pages) : illustrations. This publication is based on the results of piloting the African Gender and Development Index (AGDI) in 12 African countries across the five subregions of the continent. Making a case for countries to invest in sex disaggregated data collection, the outcomes provide an indication of the general situation of women across the continent.

African women (1). refresh. Member recommendations.

Organizations like Mujeres por África (Women for Africa) . Gender inequality translates into a huge drag on socio-economic development.

Organizations like Mujeres por África (Women for Africa) contribute to such a change. For instance, when a society leaves half of its population behind in terms of opportunities and recognition, an important part of its potential for new ideas and motion vanishes with it. Let’s take a look at the index for gender inequality that the United Nations publishes across countries. It measures gender inequalities in 3 important aspects of human development: Reproductive health, measured by maternal mortality ratio and adolescent birth rates.

African women's report. experiences and lessons from the African Gender and Development Index, 2009, Measuring gender inequality in Africa.

African Women’s Report. Measuring gender inequality in Africa: Experiences and lessons from the African gender and development index

African Women’s Report. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. Women on corporate boards of directors: The timing is right. Buvinic, . & Morrison, A. (2000). epartment of Sociology, Faculty of the Social SciencesEkiti State UniversityAdo EkitiNigeria.

Gender and Social Development Updates from the Economic Commission for Africa

Gender and Social Development Updates from the Economic Commission for Africa. South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt and Algeria are among the largest economies on the continent (International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook 2015). However political, economic, and social transformation varies greatly among African countries.

The colonial roots of gender inequality refers to the political, educational, and economic inequalities between men and women in Africa. According to a Global Gender Gap Index report published in 2018, it would take 135 years to close the gender gap in Africa and nearly 153 years to close the gap in North Africa.

The 2016 African Human Development report focuses on gender inequality, and it’s not good news. This includes everything from economic disparities – women earn 70% of the income that men do – to social inequality. Women are at elevated risk of sexual and physical violence

This publication is based on the results of piloting the African Gender and Development Index (AGDI) in 12 African countries across the five subregions of the continent. Making a case for countries to invest in sex disaggregated data collection, the outcomes provide an indication of the general situation of women across the continent. The result of the AGDI trials demonstrate that countries have shown commitment to international, regional and subregional treaties affecting women through overwhelming ratification. The report confirms existing MDG status reports which indicate remarkable progress being made with respect to MDG2 on universal Access to Basic Education. With the aid of systematic collection of sex aggregated data, the report calls for enhanced commitment towards accelerated implementation of gender equality as outlined in frameworks such as the ICPD+15, Beijing+15, the Convention of the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the African Women's Protocol.--Publisher's description.