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eBook Relationality: From Attachment to Intersubjectivity (Relational Perspectives Book Series) ePub

eBook Relationality: From Attachment to Intersubjectivity (Relational Perspectives Book Series) ePub

by Stephen A. Mitchell

  • ISBN: 0881634174
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Stephen A. Mitchell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 3, 2003)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1671 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1157 kb
  • Other: docx azw txt lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 446

Description

The Relational Perspectives Book Series (RPBS) publishes books that grow out of or contribute to the relational tradition in contemporary psychoanalysis

The Relational Perspectives Book Series (RPBS) publishes books that grow out of or contribute to the relational tradition in contemporary psychoanalysis. The term relational psychoanalysis was first used by Greenberg and Mitchell to bridge the traditions of interpersonal relations, as developed within interpersonal psychoanalysis and object relations, as developed within contemporary British theory. But, under the seminal work of the late Stephen A. Mitchell, the term relational psychoanalysis grew and began to accrue to itself many other influences and developments.

Relationality: From Attachment to Intersubjectivity (Relational Perspectives Book Series). by Stephen A. Mitchell. ISBN 13: 9780881634174.

info/?book 0881633224 if you want to download this book OR. Recommended.

In this book the relational perspective 'comes of ag.  . Stephen Mitchell's writing is always a delight and an education. Mitchell brings his supreme confidence in navigating psychoanalytic theories to bear on the evolution of the relational perspective. In Relationality, with his characteristic lucidity, Mitchell explores the multiple dimensions and nuances of relationality, attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory. He shows the voices of Loewald, Fairbairn, Bowlby, Winnicott, and Sullivan converge and can be interwoven.

Mitchell draws on the multiple dimensions of attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory in espousing a clinical approach equally notable for its responsiveness and responsible restraint

Mitchell draws on the multiple dimensions of attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory in espousing a clinical approach equally notable for its responsiveness and responsible restraint. Relationality "signals a new height in Mitchell's always illuminating writing" (Nancy Chodorow) and marks the "coming of age" of the relational perspective in psychoanalysis (Peter Fonagy).

by Stephen A. Series: Relational Perspectives Book. In his final contribution to the psychoanalytic literature published two months before his untimely death on December 21, 2000, the late Stephen A. Mitchell provided a brilliant synthesis of the interrelated ideas that hover around, and describe aspects of, the relational matrix of human experience.

Relationships in Development examines the practical implications for dynamic psychotherapy with both adults and children, especially following trauma. Stephen Seligman offers engaging examples of infant-parent interactions as well as of psychotherapeutic process

Relationality : From Attachment to Intersubjectivity.

Relationality : From Attachment to Intersubjectivity.

Mitchell draws on the multiple dimensions of attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory in espousing a clinical approach equally notable for its responsiveness and responsible restraint.

eBook Rental from £1. 0. Mitchell draws on the multiple dimensions of attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory in espousing a clinical approach equally notable for its responsiveness and responsible restraint. Part I: From Ghosts to Ancestors: The Psychoanalytic Vision of Hans Loewald. Part II: Levels of Organization

Start by marking Relationality: From Attachment to Intersubjectivity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Relationality: From Attachment to Intersubjectivity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

In his final contribution to the psychoanalytic literature published two months before his untimely death on December 21, 2000, the late Stephen A. Mitchell provided a brilliant synthesis of the interrelated ideas that hover around, and describe aspects of, the relational matrix of human experience. Relationality charts the emergence of the relational perspective in psychoanalysis by reviewing the contributions of Loewald, Fairbairn, Bowlby, and Sullivan, whose voices converge in apprehending the fundamental relationality of mind. Mitchell draws on the multiple dimensions of attachment, intersubjectivity, and systems theory in espousing a clinical approach equally notable for its responsiveness and responsible restraint. Relationality "signals a new height in Mitchell's always illuminating writing" (Nancy Chodorow) and marks the "coming of age" of the relational perspective in psychoanalysis (Peter Fonagy).

Comments

Steelcaster Steelcaster
This book was okay, and I thought about giving it four stars, but it's pretty expensive for a short book with so many typos. I learned quite a bit about Loewald's theories from reading it, which has helped shape my understanding of the mind. However, beyond that, I can't say I took a lot away from this book. It's very academic, so if you're interested primarily in psychoanalytic consilience, this is probably a relatively useful read, but it's had a minimal effect on me as a therapist.
Vosho Vosho
Mitchell goes deep, which is why this book transcends the category of a "survey" of developments in the thinking and practices of theoreticians and practitioners of psychoanalysis. The survey material is there, but Mitchell's discussion of various perspectives on realationality, especially that of Loewald, made a much needed deposit in my own knowledge bank and helped me better understand the concept and its implications in human development. Not easy reading, but worth the effort.
Vudojar Vudojar
I wholeheartedly agree with the two comments made above. His elaborations on H.Loewald's understanding of a non-dualistic perception in which perceiver and perceived are one (in terms of primary process) are especially illuminating. "Loewald argued repeatedly that is a fateful error, which has become a cultural norm, to equate the world of objectivity whith the true, sole reality." "..if language has been drawn to completely into secondary-process functions, if the original affective density of language has been almost completely severed, the result is a functionally competent but affectively dead and empty life."

The french word "connaître" which stand for knowing signifies "to be born with". Has the highly fragmented and intellectualized modern man become a master manipulator of things without ever really knowing anything from the inside out? That could in fact be called a dead and empty life.
Opilar Opilar
I have just been reading Fairbairn. Fairbairn is down to earth. More so than Freud and much more than Mitchell.
Fairbairn is interested in War neurosis. Fairbairn is interested in delinquent youth.
Mitchell is the exact opposite.
Mitchell doesnt seem interested in clinical issues. He is not interested in social problems.
He is trying to teach us about life in general. Which means life for people of his kind..
He is similar to Heidegger.
Framokay Framokay
This is the final book published by Dr. Mitchell's during his tragically shortened lifetime, and it is a gem.

The main theme is his attempt to integrate contributions from a variety of relational psychoanalysts whose approaches are extremely different from one another. He does this by pointing to the many possible dimensions that simultaneously coexist in any given relationship, and how these various authors focus differentially on one or another aspect. He highlights what he calls the four modes of relatedness, defined as (1) nonreflective interchanges reflecting patterns of interpersonal influence, (2) deeply felt shared emotions where boundaries seem to melt away, (3) roles recognized as conforming to earlier models of the self and important figures, and (4) intersubjective exchanges between individuals recognizing each others' distinct individuality.

He critically and appreciatively reviews the work of major authors, including Loewald, Bowlby, Fairbairn, and others, and attempts to fit their contributions into his heuristic scheme.

I consider the first two chapters, in which Mitchell discusses the work of Hans Loewald, to be among the most moving and penetrating things he ever wrote. One is hard pressed to find a more inspired exposition of the work of Loewald, and I have often thought that Mitchell's immersion in Loewald's work opened up unparalleled areas of creative vision for him. They are my two favorite chapters in all of his writing.

As with all of Dr. Mitchell's writing, discussion of theory is interspersed with pithy and compelling clinical examples. This is an excellent book and an important contribution to current psychoanalytic thinking. I found his heuristic device of Modes 1,2 3, and 4 a bit confusing and somewhat off-putting at times, but it serves his purpose well enough.

Those of us who have cherished Dr. Mitchell's work over the years will savor this book and imagine what might have followed.