cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Specter of Democracy
eBook The Specter of Democracy ePub

eBook The Specter of Democracy ePub

by Dick Howard

  • ISBN: 0231124848
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Dick Howard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (September 15, 2002)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1851 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1305 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 644

Description

Dick Howard (he seems to use the forms Dick and Richard equally) has written "The Specter of Democracy" as a. .

Dick Howard (he seems to use the forms Dick and Richard equally) has written "The Specter of Democracy" as a series of essay-like philosophical conceptions of the relation between Marx and modern day democracy. Of itself, this is an interesting idea and his clearly intelligent discussion of matters on the intersection between philosophy and political science shows considerable talent for using the difficult concepts of these fields.

Dick Howard (he seems to use the forms Dick and Richard equally) has written "The Specter of Democracy" as a.

The Specter of Democracy. The author turns to the American and French Revolutions to uncover what was truly revolutionary about those events, arguing that two distinct styles of democratic life emerged, the implications of which were misinterpreted in light of the rise of communism.

The Specter of Democracy - Dick Howard. Introduction: Why Should We, and How Should We, Reclaim Marx? Imagine that Karl Marx had sat down in 1847 and written, A specter is haunting Europe, the specter of democracy. While the encounter of Marxism and the intellectuals in part 1 of this book concludes with the passage from the critique of totalitarianism to the politics of democracy, democracy is defined there only in the categories of political philosophy and illustrated by contrast to the varieties of antipolitics. Part 2 attempts to fill in the picture of democracy and to explain some.

Howard, Dick, 1943– The specter of democracy, Dick Howard. Columbia University Press books are printed on permanent and durable acid-free paper. Printed in the United States of America Designed by Audrey Smith. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1. Contents. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn 0–231–12484–8 (cloth : alk. paper) 1. Democracy. 2. Marx, Karl, 1818–1883-Political and social views.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Specter of Democracy. 9 Mb.

Dick Howard is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He has also published several books in French, most recently La democratie a l'epreuve. Country of Publication. What Marx and Marxists Haven't Understood and Why. by: Dick Howard. Publisher: Columbia University Press (Perseus). Print ISBN: 9780231124850, 0231124856. These eTextbooks work best on large-screen devices and do not contain any embedded media or interactives. Fixed-layout eTextbooks support a wide range of features, including (but not limited to): notes, highlights, text-to-speech, printing, syncing across devices, and more.

In this rethinking of Marxism and its blind spots, Dick Howard argues that the collapse of European communism in 1989 should not be identified with a victory for capitalism and makes possible a wholesale reevaluation of democratic politics in the U.S. and abroad. The author turns to the American and French Revolutions to uncover what was truly "revolutionary" about those events, arguing that two distinct styles of democratic life emerged, the implications of which were misinterpreted in light of the rise of communism.Howard uses a critical rereading of Marx as a theorist of democracy to offer his audience a new way to think about this political ideal. He argues that it is democracy, rather than Marxism, that is radical and revolutionary, and that Marx could have seen this but did not. In Part I, Howard explores the attraction Marxism held for intellectuals, particularly French intellectuals, and he demonstrates how the critique of totalitarianism from a Marxist viewpoint allowed these intellectuals to see the radical nature of democracy. Part II examines two hundred years of democratic political life―comparing America's experience as a democracy to that of France. Part III offers a rethinking of Marx's contribution to democratic politics. Howard concludes that Marx was attempting a "philosophy by other means," and that paradoxically, just because he was such an astute philosopher, Marx was unable to see the radical political implications of his own analyses. The philosophically justified "revolution" turns out to be the basis of an anti-politics whose end was foreshadowed by the fall of European communism in 1989.