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eBook Setting Limits Fairly: Can We Learn to Share Medical Resources? ePub

eBook Setting Limits Fairly: Can We Learn to Share Medical Resources? ePub

by James E. Sabin,Norman Daniels

  • ISBN: 019532594X
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: James E. Sabin,Norman Daniels
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; 2 edition
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1782 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1842 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf mobi mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 603

Description

Norman Daniels is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and . James Sabin is a Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Norman Daniels is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health at Harvard University. Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise Hardcover.

In 1985, Norman Daniels published Just Health Care, which articulated the . In this new book, Daniels and James E. Sabin offer another approach.

In 1985, Norman Daniels published Just Health Care, which articulated the first useful, nonutilitarian ethical principle for distributing health care resources. Daniels claimed that health care was important because it helped to ensure "normal human functioning," which in turn enhances people's opportunities to pursue their life plans. One conclusion of Setting Limits Fairly is that, because of limited resources and nonmedical priorities, justice does not entitle people to all effective medical services. Another is that justice does not entitle every person to the same set of medical services.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Setting Limits Fairly: Can We Learn .

The central idea for this book is that we lack consensus on principles for allocating resources and in the absence of such a consensus we must rely on a fair decision-making process for setting limits on health care.

Norman Daniels and James E. Sabin. The central idea for this book is that we lack consensus on principles for allocating resources and, in the absence of such a consensus, we must rely on a fair decision-making process for setting limits on health care. It also describes the book's own approach, which represents a clear advance in thinking.

Rather than proposing specific principles, Daniels and Sabin argue that normative questions, such as how the benefits of scarce medical interventions should be distributed, can be addressed through the development and operation of fair procedures. What Is the Relevance of Procedural Fairness to Making Determinations about Medical Evidence? Article.

Oxford University Press, 2002. Authors and affiliations.

Setting Limits Fairly book.

Tufts University, USA). Sabin, James E. (Harvard Medical School, USA). Registered: Abstract. The central idea for this book is that we lack consensus on principles for allocating resources and in the absence of such a consensus we must rely on a fair decision-making process for setting limits on health care.

Daniels, Norman and Sabin, James E. (2002). Related Items in Google Scholar.

This book addresses the vexed, much-debated, and increasingly important question of sharing medical resources in a way the public wil accept as fair and . Medical aid. Public health. Related books and articles.

This book addresses the vexed, much-debated, and increasingly important question of sharing medical resources in a way the public wil accept as fair and legitimate. The authors-one a professor of medical ethics and the other a professor of psychiatry-are based in the USA, but they recognise that problems of trust and legitimacy are international and not limited to the US system of competitive managed care.

The central idea behind this book is that we lack consensus on principles for allocating medical resources -- and in the absence of such a consensus we must develop and rely on a fair decision-making process for setting limits on health care. Daniels and Sabin provide a cogent analysis of the current situation, lucidly review the usual candidate solutions, and describe their own approach. The audience for the book is global since the problem of limited resources cuts across types of health care systems whether or not they have universal coverage. In its first edition the book stimulated considerable work on setting priorities in health care, both here and abroad. The revision adds new material to the book, including several chapters by Daniels on new international research data from Mexico and Canada, and a new chapter on managing pharmacy benefits. Having the book available in paperback will also extends its influence, particularly as the topic grows in importance.