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eBook Not for Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions of a Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman ePub

eBook Not for Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions of a Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman ePub

by Ruby Modesto,Guy Mount

  • ISBN: 0960446206
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Ruby Modesto,Guy Mount
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sweetlight Books; 3rd Edition edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 124
  • ePub book: 1773 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1134 kb
  • Other: lit mbr docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 441

Description

Not For Innocent Ears book. Narrated by Ruby Modesto.

Not For Innocent Ears book.

Читать книгу Тайная история сновидений. Mystical Origins of the Tarot. Rochester, VT: Destiny Books, 2004. The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Not For Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions Of A Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

book by Ruby Modesto. An autobiography of an Indian pul or medicine woman, with a brief history of her tribe and five Cahuilla folktales. An autobiography of an Indian "pul" or medicine woman, with a brief history of her tribe and five Cahuilla folktales.

Modesto, Ruby, and Guy Mount. In Dream Cultures: Explorations in the Comparative History of Dreaming, ed. David Shulman and Guy G. Stroumsa, pp. 303–314. Not for Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions of a Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman. Arcata, CA: Sweetlight Books, 2000. Churchill: The Struggle for Survival. London: Constable, 1966. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Not for Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions of a Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman. Shulman, David, and Guy G. Stroumsa, eds. Dream Cultures: Explorations in the Comparative History of Dreaming. She holds master's degrees in museum studies and is currently pursuing a doctorate in anthropology from the University of California at Riverside. Deborah facilitated and recorded the conversations reproduced in the text.

spiritual traditions of a desert Cahuilla medicine woman. Rev. ed. by Ruby Modesto.

In my 2012 book, Shamanic Drumming: Calling the Spirits, I recount my own journey into shamanic practice and . Ruby has also written a book "Not for Innocent Ears: Spiritual Traditions of a Desert Cahuilla Medicine Woman. Arcata, CA: Sweetlight Books, 1980.

In my 2012 book, Shamanic Drumming: Calling the Spirits, I recount my own journey into shamanic practice and explore what someone should do if they feel the call to become a shaman.

Not for innocent ears. spiritual traditions of a desert Cahuilla medicine woman. Bibliography: p. 120-123

Not for innocent ears. Published 1980 by Sweetlight Books in Angelus Oaks, Calif. Biography, Cahuilla Indians, Indians of North America, Religion, Shamanism. 120-123.

An autobiography of an Indian "pul" or medicine woman, with a brief history of her tribe and five Cahuilla folktales.

Comments

Arakus Arakus
This is not a book with details on the level of say The Sacred Pipe, but I can understand why. Coming from Hawaii I know the medicine people/spiritual leaders often keep certain things reserved for those who are ready for it. I am sure even The Sacred Pipe only records certain basics of Lakota ceremonies/rituals and certain things were left out. The medicine/spiritual people do not simply reveal things even for money, at least not the ethical ones. This short book provides a basic taste or feel of Cahuilla culture and some of their ways or at least their ways from Ruby's point of view of some things perhaps fading from their culture. If you're reading this book to learn about the detailed specifics of their medicine ways this will perhaps not fit that role but perhaps be a starting point for learning more. Ruby Modesto passed which is a shame because she no doubt had much wisdom and knowledge to impart.

At the time of the writing of this review it seems the paper/print version of the book is out of print so the prices are starting at around $65 for a new copy and at least $12 for a used one plus postage. You can buy the Kindle version for around $9. I didn't see a link to the Kindle version with the print version of the book, not sure why, so I just wanted to leave this note for those who'd like to purchase the Kindle version and save a few dollars in the process.
Doriel Doriel
The book was an excellent resource for me. I am from the Torres Martinez reservation same as the author, so I thought the book was great and it gave me history that I did not know about. The medicine men and her healing powers kept my attention and I loved to read the stories she told about how her power came about and how she used it. I am honored to know she was from the Torres Martinez reservation.
Daiktilar Daiktilar
What an excellent book! There aren't many elders left who have this kind of knowledge and it was an honor to read what this native woman was willing to share. The book was easy to read and fascinating. Everyone should read this book!
Jairani Jairani
Too bad this is no longer in print. A very spiritual and insightful book about the Native People of southern California.
Gietadia Gietadia
I felt the book was not a bringer of positive vibes. May all involved prosper in peace.
Windworker Windworker
and its tale was told by a very daring and courageous woman, a Desert Cahuilla pul (medicine woman) in the deepest and truest sense.

Guy Mount, a professor of Native American studies, was a marvelous listener. He recorded Ruby Modesto's telling of her story with integrity and non-interference. He admired her greatly in the brief time they were to spend with one another.

This book allows the reader, unlike any work that I know, to gaze into a female pul's soul. The reader can only do this because Mrs. Modesto chooses to reveal her very inner being. One is left with a feeling of great tenderness for her, and personally it made me realize more than ever before that, as a woman and a human being, there is a part of myself that is undeveloped and partially missing. When D. H. Lawrence questioned in one of his poems as to whatever became of the American aborigines, he volleyed (and I hope I'm quoting him correctly) "Those people were some sort of a solution."

Mrs. Modesto states that she did not come into her full powers as a pul until the age of 40, when her mother died. Although she had many skills, and much knowledge (as Mr. Mount states, the Cahuilla Indians were a visionary people), she learned that her truest calling was "healing a person who is possessed by demons". And heal them she did.

There is so much beauty in this book that I really deem it to be a sacred work. It leaves one in as much awe as the study of the great world religions.

In the concluding chapter, Mr. Mount asks Ruby if she ever talks to the earth. She replies: "Well, of course I talk to the earth." He then asks her "What do you say?" This was her answer:

"Thank you mother earth
for holding me on your breast,
You always love me
no matter how old I get."

The book is brief, but it is very, very full.
Beahelm Beahelm
I am also a Cahuilla woman and I know this person personally, she was my grandmother, so I know that what she has put into this book is truth. She taught me many things and many of them are in this book. If you have a chance to read it - it comes very highly recommended by another Cahuilla Indian.