cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Creed of a Priest of Savoy (Milestones of Thought Series)
eBook Creed of a Priest of Savoy (Milestones of Thought Series) ePub

eBook Creed of a Priest of Savoy (Milestones of Thought Series) ePub

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau,Arthur H. Beattie

  • ISBN: 0804467692
  • Subcategory: Other
  • Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau,Arthur H. Beattie
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ungar Pub Co (June 1, 1956)
  • Pages: 84
  • ePub book: 1964 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1711 kb
  • Other: mobi lit doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 326

Description

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century. He wrote other books such as The Social Contract and Other Essays,The Confessions, etc. This book is actually an excerpt from Emile: Or On Education

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century. This book is actually an excerpt from Emile: Or On Education. and Emile, a novel which is at the same time a treatise on education. The young hero receives no religious instruction until he is fifteen, old enough to judge for himself the ideas which he adopts.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Arthur H. Beattie (Translator). Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. Is this you? Let us know.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a major Genevois philosopher, writer, and .

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a major Genevois philosopher, writer, and composer of 18th-century Romanticism. His political philosophy influenced the French Revolution and the development of modern political, sociological and educational thought. Rousseau's autobiographical writings: his Confessions, which initiated the modern autobiography, and his Reveries of a Solitary Walker were among the pre-eminent examples of the late 18th-century movement known as the "Age of Sensibility", featuring an increasing focus on subjectivity and introspection that has characterized the modern age. Rousseau also made important contributions to music as a theorist.

This Jean-Jacques Rousseau bibliography includes all books by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, including . Below you'll find a Jean-Jacques Rousseau books list, including published and even unpublished works.

Any type of book or journal citing. Any type of book or journal citing Jean-Jacques Rousseau as a writer should appear on this list.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (UK: /ˈruːsoʊ/, US: /ruːˈsoʊ/; French: ; 28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer and composer

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (UK: /ˈruːsoʊ/, US: /ruːˈsoʊ/; French: ; 28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer and composer. His political philosophy influenced the progress of the Enlightenment throughout Europe, as well as aspects of the French Revolution and the development of modern political, economic and educational thought.

Similar books and articles. The Creed of a Priest of Savoy. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - 1974 - New York: New American Library. The Green Count of Savoy: Amadeus VI and Transalpine Savoy in the Fourteenth Century. Eugene L. Cox. William Bowsky - 1968 - Speculum 43 (4):698-701. The House of Savoy in Thirteenth Century Europe. Jean Richard - 1977 - Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 55 (1):367-368.

My child, do not look to me for learned speeches or profound arguments. I am no great philosopher, nor do I desire to be one. I have, however, a certain amount of common-sense and a constant devotion to truth. I have no wish to argue with you nor even to convince you; it is enough for me to show you, in all simplicity of heart, what I really think. Consult your own heart while I speak that is all I ask.

Download books for free. Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Rousseau, Jean-Jacques - Confessions of Jean-jacques Rousseau, The. Rousseau Jacques.

The confessions of jean-jacques rousseau. JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU was born in Geneva in 1712

The confessions of jean-jacques rousseau. JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU was born in Geneva in 1712. Abandoned by his father at the age of ten he tried his hand as an engraver’s apprentice before he left the city in 1728. From then on he was to wander Europe seeking an elusive happiness. At Turin he became a Catholic convert; and as a footman, seminarist, music teacher or tutor visited many parts of Switzerland and France. In 1732 he settled for eight years at Chambéry or at Les Charmettes, the country house of Madame de Warens, remembered by Rousseau as an idyllic place in the Confessions.

Book by Rousseau, Jean-Jacques

Comments

Kulalas Kulalas
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century. He wrote other books such as The Social Contract and Other Essays,The Confessions, etc.

This book is actually an excerpt from Emile: Or On Education. The editor explains in the Introduction, "The year 1762 saw the publication of both The Social Contract... and Emile, a novel which is at the same time a treatise on education. The young hero receives no religious instruction until he is fifteen, old enough to judge for himself the ideas which he adopts. Rousseau is eager that the child not have the beliefs of his family or his teachers inculcated in him at an age when he might uncritically accept them. `The Creed of a Priest of Savoy,' an idealization of the guidance in religious thought which Rousseau himself had received from two priests when as a youth he fled from Geneva to Turin, is introduced to demonstrate the sort of instruction in religion which might be incorporated in the ideal program of education." (Pg. x)

The priest-narrator says, "But who am I? What right have I to judge things? And what is it which determines my judgments? If they are a necessary consequence of the impressions which I receive, I weary myself in vain pursuing these questions; they will not be answered by themselves without my striving to solve the problem. I must first, then, turn my eyes upon myself in order to know the instrument which I wish to use, and to know how far I can trust its use." (Pg. 7) He continues, "My sensations take place within me, since they make me aware of my existence; but their cause is outside me, since they affect me in spite of myself, and it is not within my power to produce or exclude them. I conceive then clearly that my sensation which is within me, and its cause which is outside me, are not the same thing." (Pg. 8) He concludes, "I am not, then, merely a sensitive and passive being, but an active an intelligent one; and, whatever philosophy may say, I shall dare to lay claim the honor of thinking. I know only that the truth is in things and not in my mind which judges them, and that the less I put of my own in the judgments I make concerning them, the surer I am of approaching the truth: thus my rule of trusting feeling more than reason is confirmed by reason itself." (Pg. 10-11)

He observes, "If the movement of matter reveals to me a will, the movement of matter according to certain laws reveals to me an intelligence; that is my second article of faith. Acting, comparing, choosing, these are the operations of an active and thinking being: therefore that being exists. `Where do you see him?' you are going to ask me. Not only in the revolving heavens, in the sun which gives us light; not only in myself, but in the grazing sheep, the flying bird, the falling stone, the leaf borne away by the wind." (Pg. 16)

He notes, "Doubtless I am not free not to will my own good, I am not free to will harm to myself; but my liberty consists precisely in this fact that I can will only what is suitable for me, or what I consider to be so, without anything outside myself determining my choice. Does it follow that I am not my master because I am not master of being someone other than myself? The spring of all action is in the will of a free being, one cannot go back farther than that. It is not the word LIBERTY which is meaningless, it is NECESSITY... Either there is no first impulse, or every first impulse has no previous cause, and there is no real will without liberty. Man is therefore free in his actions, and as such animated by an immaterial substance; this is my third article of faith." (Pg. 26)

He states, "Man, seek no more the author of evil; that author is yourself. There exists no other evil than the evil you do or you suffer, and both come from you. General evil can exist only in disorder, and I see in the system of the world an order which in no wise belies itself. Individual evil is only in the feeling of the being who suffers; and man has not received this feeling from nature; he had given it to himself. Suffering has little hold on him who, having reflected little, has neither memory nor fear. Take away our ill-fated progress, take away our errors and our vices, take away the work of man, and all is well." (Pg. 28)

He suggests, "Conscience is the voice of the soul, passions are the voice of the body. Is it astonishing that often these two tongues contradict one another? And then which should you heed? Too often reason deceives us; we have only too often acquired the right to challenge it. Conscience, on the contrary, never deceives us; it is the true guide of man; it is to the soul what instinct is to the body; he who follows conscience obeys nature, and need not fear going astray." (Pg. 36-37)

The priest asserts in a fictional dialogue, "God has spoken!... And to whom has he spoken? He has spoken to men---Why then have I heard nothing of this revelation?---He has instructed other men to repeat his word to you... I should have preferred to hear God himself... and I should have been protected against being led astray.---He protects you ... by making manifest the mission of his envoys.---In what way?---By miracles.---And where are those miracles?---In books.---and who saw the miracles?---Men who attest to them.---What! Still more testimony of men! Still more men who report to me what other men have reported! How many men between God and me!" (Pg. 56) He continues, "Is there justice in giving mankind, as the only credentials offered, nothing but a few special signs made before very few obscure persons, and concerning which all the rest of men will never know anything except by hearsay? ... Let us suppose that a man comes to you to speak to us in this wise: Mortals, I announce to you the will of the Almighty; recognize by my voice the one who sends me; I order the sun to change its course, the stars to rearrange themselves in new constellations, the mountains to be flattened out, the waters to rise, the earth to take on a different aspect. At these marvels, who will not recognize immediately the master of nature?... If your miracles, performed in order to prove your doctrine, need to be proved themselves, of what use are they?" (Pg. 58)

He summarizes, "The God whom I worship is not a God of darkness; that he has not endowed me with an understanding in order to forbid me to use it. To tell me to make my reason submit is to insult its creator. The minister of truth does not exercise a tyranny over my reason, but rather he enlightens it." (Pg. 60)

This fairly brief excerpt is a useful way to learn more of Rousseau's philosophy (in its non-political aspects).
Zonama Zonama
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century. He wrote other books such as The Social Contract and Other Essays,The Confessions, etc.

This book is actually an excerpt from Emile: Or On Education. The editor explains in the Introduction, "The year 1762 saw the publication of both The Social Contract... and Emile, a novel which is at the same time a treatise on education. The young hero receives no religious instruction until he is fifteen, old enough to judge for himself the ideas which he adopts. Rousseau is eager that the child not have the beliefs of his family or his teachers inculcated in him at an age when he might uncritically accept them. `The Creed of a Priest of Savoy,' an idealization of the guidance in religious thought which Rousseau himself had received from two priests when as a youth he fled from Geneva to Turin, is introduced to demonstrate the sort of instruction in religion which might be incorporated in the ideal program of education." (Pg. x)

The priest-narrator says, "But who am I? What right have I to judge things? And what is it which determines my judgments? If they are a necessary consequence of the impressions which I receive, I weary myself in vain pursuing these questions; they will not be answered by themselves without my striving to solve the problem. I must first, then, turn my eyes upon myself in order to know the instrument which I wish to use, and to know how far I can trust its use." (Pg. 7) He continues, "My sensations take place within me, since they make me aware of my existence; but their cause is outside me, since they affect me in spite of myself, and it is not within my power to produce or exclude them. I conceive then clearly that my sensation which is within me, and its cause which is outside me, are not the same thing." (Pg. 8) He concludes, "I am not, then, merely a sensitive and passive being, but an active an intelligent one; and, whatever philosophy may say, I shall dare to lay claim the honor of thinking. I know only that the truth is in things and not in my mind which judges them, and that the less I put of my own in the judgments I make concerning them, the surer I am of approaching the truth: thus my rule of trusting feeling more than reason is confirmed by reason itself." (Pg. 10-11)

He observes, "If the movement of matter reveals to me a will, the movement of matter according to certain laws reveals to me an intelligence; that is my second article of faith. Acting, comparing, choosing, these are the operations of an active and thinking being: therefore that being exists. `Where do you see him?' you are going to ask me. Not only in the revolving heavens, in the sun which gives us light; not only in myself, but in the grazing sheep, the flying bird, the falling stone, the leaf borne away by the wind." (Pg. 16)

He notes, "Doubtless I am not free not to will my own good, I am not free to will harm to myself; but my liberty consists precisely in this fact that I can will only what is suitable for me, or what I consider to be so, without anything outside myself determining my choice. Does it follow that I am not my master because I am not master of being someone other than myself? The spring of all action is in the will of a free being, one cannot go back farther than that. It is not the word LIBERTY which is meaningless, it is NECESSITY... Either there is no first impulse, or every first impulse has no previous cause, and there is no real will without liberty. Man is therefore free in his actions, and as such animated by an immaterial substance; this is my third article of faith." (Pg. 26)

He states, "Man, seek no more the author of evil; that author is yourself. There exists no other evil than the evil you do or you suffer, and both come from you. General evil can exist only in disorder, and I see in the system of the world an order which in no wise belies itself. Individual evil is only in the feeling of the being who suffers; and man has not received this feeling from nature; he had given it to himself. Suffering has little hold on him who, having reflected little, has neither memory nor fear. Take away our ill-fated progress, take away our errors and our vices, take away the work of man, and all is well." (Pg. 28)

He suggests, "Conscience is the voice of the soul, passions are the voice of the body. Is it astonishing that often these two tongues contradict one another? And then which should you heed? Too often reason deceives us; we have only too often acquired the right to challenge it. Conscience, on the contrary, never deceives us; it is the true guide of man; it is to the soul what instinct is to the body; he who follows conscience obeys nature, and need not fear going astray." (Pg. 36-37)

The priest asserts in a fictional dialogue, "God has spoken!... And to whom has he spoken? He has spoken to men---Why then have I heard nothing of this revelation?---He has instructed other men to repeat his word to you... I should have preferred to hear God himself... and I should have been protected against being led astray.---He protects you ... by making manifest the mission of his envoys.---In what way?---By miracles.---And where are those miracles?---In books.---and who saw the miracles?---Men who attest to them.---What! Still more testimony of men! Still more men who report to me what other men have reported! How many men between God and me!" (Pg. 56) He continues, "Is there justice in giving mankind, as the only credentials offered, nothing but a few special signs made before very few obscure persons, and concerning which all the rest of men will never know anything except by hearsay? ... Let us suppose that a man comes to you to speak to us in this wise: Mortals, I announce to you the will of the Almighty; recognize by my voice the one who sends me; I order the sun to change its course, the stars to rearrange themselves in new constellations, the mountains to be flattened out, the waters to rise, the earth to take on a different aspect. At these marvels, who will not recognize immediately the master of nature?... If your miracles, performed in order to prove your doctrine, need to be proved themselves, of what use are they?" (Pg. 58)

He summarizes, "The God whom I worship is not a God of darkness; that he has not endowed me with an understanding in order to forbid me to use it. To tell me to make my reason submit is to insult its creator. The minister of truth does not exercise a tyranny over my reason, but rather he enlightens it." (Pg. 60)

This fairly brief excerpt is a useful way to learn more of Rousseau's philosophy (in its non-political aspects).