cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art and Writing About it a Game
eBook Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art and Writing About it a Game ePub

eBook Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art and Writing About it a Game ePub

by Roger Kahn

  • ISBN: 0786883162
  • Category: Baseball
  • Subcategory: Outdoors Sport
  • Author: Roger Kahn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hyperion (April 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1400 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1755 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 215

Description

Memories of Summer book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Memories of Summer book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art, and Writing about It a Game as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

Esteemed baseball writer Roger Kahn's Memories of Summer makes a fine companion to his earlier classic,The . Kahn's masterpiece is The Boys of Summer (1972), a nostalgic study of the great Brooklyn Dodger teams of the 1950s

Esteemed baseball writer Roger Kahn's Memories of Summer makes a fine companion to his earlier classic,The Boys of Summer. Both books plow similar soil-Kahn's roots in Brooklyn and his years covering the Dodgers with fertile prose-but the similarities end there. Kahn's masterpiece is The Boys of Summer (1972), a nostalgic study of the great Brooklyn Dodger teams of the 1950s. Though Boys spawned a quickly tiresome onslaught of pastoral baseball memoirs, the original retains its charm because Kahn-now nearly 70-is a master at evoking a sense of the past.

Acclaimed baseball writer Roger Kahn gives us a memoir of his Brooklyn childhood, a recollection of a life . Often hilarious, always precise about action on the field and off, Memories of Summer is an enduring classic about how baseball met literature to the benefit of both.

Acclaimed baseball writer Roger Kahn gives us a memoir of his Brooklyn childhood, a recollection of a life in journalism, and a record of personal acquaintance with the greatest ballplayers of several eras. His father had a passion for the Dodgers; his mother’s passion was for poetry. Somehow, young Roger managed to blend both loves in a career that encompassed writing about sports for the New York Herald Tribune, Sports Illustrated, the Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, and Time.

Электронная книга "Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art, and Writing about It a Game", Roger Kahn. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art, and Writing about It a Game" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Esteemed baseball writer Roger Kahn's Memories of Summer makes a. .His love of his father is written about in such a profound manner that is timeless.

Esteemed baseball writer Roger Kahn's Memories of Summer makes a fine companion to his earlier classic,The Boys of Summer. Mr. Kahn turns back the clock to the days when baseball was the true American pastime. His anecdotes and interviews about Mantle, Mays, and Early Wynn bring these individuals to life more than any statistics possibly could. In all a classic piece of Americana that hopefully will be read fifty years from now. an enjoyable look to yesteryear. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 20 years ago.

When Baseball Was an Art. and Writing About It a Game. 283 pp. New York: Hyperion Books. Viewed from a distance, the years from 1947 to 1960 were baseball's worst period

When Baseball Was an Art. Viewed from a distance, the years from 1947 to 1960 were baseball's worst period. There was little competition, with two teams, the Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, winning 17 of the possible 28 pennants. Attendance was down in most major cities. Classic ballparks were falling apart. Classic franchises such as the Dodgers and Giants broke the hearts of millions of fans by moving to new cities

Roger Kahn, American author. Recipient Best Magazine Sports Article of Year award E. P. Dutton Publications, 1960, 69, 70, 80, 82; recipient Distinguished Alumni Sesquicentennial award New York University, 1981.

Roger Kahn, American author. Member Brooklyn Dodger Hall of Fame. 1967; Adjunct Professor creative writing, Colorado College, 1972; director non-fiction writers workshop, U. Rochester, 1974, 75, 77; president, Utica Blue Sox Baseball Team, New York

Roger Kahn (born October 31, 1927) is an American author, best known for his 1972 baseball book The Boys of Summer. Kahn's family first settled in the New York area in 1848, and he was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1927

Roger Kahn (born October 31, 1927) is an American author, best known for his 1972 baseball book The Boys of Summer. Kahn's family first settled in the New York area in 1848, and he was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1927. Kahn attended Froebel Academy, a prep school, then Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn. In 2004, he was named as the fourth James H. Ottaway Sr. Visiting Professor of Journalism at SUNY New Paltz.

And writing about it felt like a "game" because, he says, "I think we were more.

If Roger Kahn were a major-league hitter, rather than a major-league chronicler of the game, fans would be marveling at how "he waited on that off-speed pitch and belted it out!" And if he were the third baseman he once was, they'd express astonishment at his range - for Kahn takes on more than racism in his memoir, subtitled "When Baseball Was an Art, and Writing About It a Game. And writing about it felt like a "game" because, he says, "I think we were more playful and a little less self-important" than some of today's journalists.

A sports journalist reminisces about the days of Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, Babe Ruth, and Willie Mays, when writers hung out with ball players, before the days of agents and publicists. by the author of The Boys of Summer.

Comments

Memuro Memuro
This is a compilation of old notes and essays Kahn had available to put together into a book. I am not sure how much of this has been previously published. The dialogues with Kahn and Stengel are very amusing and the narrative about Kahn's early years as a reporter for the World Series is something I'm sure I've read before.
The book closes with two long, agonizing interviews with Mantle and Mays. On Mantle he concludes the alcohol abuse wasn't as serious as the debilitating knee and leg injuries. On Mays he agrees with George Will, who angrily attacks those who condescendingly praised Mays as a natural talent, etc. Mays, Will says in Men at Work, was always thinking ahead. So also with The Catch, which Kahn says Mays was certain he would make; the concern in his mind was getting the ball back to the infield before the runner could score from second. I saw this on TV in 1954 and of course I failed to grasp the importance of The Throw. Mays never said "Say hey!" which I saw as gently racist stereotyping. Mays went along with this nonsense. His last interview, when "Willie Mays says goodbye to America" because he couldn't play as he used to, provokes tears every time I think of it. Mantle was white and so he was deified; Willie was simply the best ever.
Ventelone Ventelone
I grew up in the 50's and baseball and the men who played it were superstars. Roger Kahn, the author brings it all back to life, while giving me a new outlook on the real men, not just what the media at the time allowed me to see. It felt good reading this book, a comfortable feeling that brought back many memories. I am also grateful that Mr. Kahn actually knew the players and wrote about them. This is not a book written by a person who was not at the games. I believe that this is one of the best books written about baseball.
Coiron Coiron
If you're a fan of baseball, especially the post World War 2 era, you'll enjoy this. I've read Kahn's Boys of Summer and this is not quite in that league. Nonetheless, Kahn is an excellent baseball writer and reporter and his talents as a sports journalist are on full display.
Delirium Delirium
The writing is very good, but what makes Memories of Summer so exceptional is the author's close relationship of so many baseball players of old. Kahn's baseball knowledge heyday was probably the 1950s and 1960s - the timing of when I became a baseball nut. His friendship with Jacky Robinson and how he writes about this baseball icon was particularly appealing to me, but the whole book brought back so many rushing memories. Nick Sisley
Rit Rit
Kahn uses material from The Boys of Summer in "Memories" and weaves different details into this book. His writing style paints pictures of people, events, places, and the times that I found fascinating. Kahn writes about a time when baseball was all white but became reluctantly integrated by the courage of just a few owners and young black men who wanted an opportunity to show that color had nothing to do with playing the game. The game was the game and is the game, a point Kahn eloquently makes from the first page to the last while telling a story of courage and change.
Maveri Maveri
I like Kahn's writing style and I like baseball. The combination makes this book a nice light, and quick summer read. Kahn tells a story about the art of playing the game of baseball and some of quirks of writing about the sport. What really pleased me about the book was the backgrond story of Kahn and his relationship with his father. A relationship that was forged in the love of baseball.
Funny duck Funny duck
Kahn grew up in Brooklyn, going to Dodger games from 1936 on, lucked into a sports writing job at the Herald-Trib, and then got to cover the Dodgers. He met the greats of New York ball in the early 50s, and met them again in the 90s. Superb on most, a bit drawn out on some, but always fair and enthusiastic.
OK