cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger
eBook The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger ePub

eBook The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger ePub

by Bill Jenkinson

  • ISBN: 0786719060
  • Category: Baseball
  • Subcategory: Outdoors Sport
  • Author: Bill Jenkinson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1st Printing edition (February 9, 2007)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1922 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1232 kb
  • Other: lrf doc docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 229

Description

What Bill Jenkinson has done in this book is to not only destroy those sceptics precepts, but also transform the .

What Bill Jenkinson has done in this book is to not only destroy those sceptics precepts, but also transform the Babe's ancient statistics into flesh and bone factual recounting that ring as interesting and exciting today as when they first occurred. After reading this book, no one - and I mean NO ONE - could seriously argue against Ruth being the greatest baseball player who ever played the game.

What Bill Jenkinson has done in this book is to not only destroy those sceptics precepts, but also transform the .

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs is a 432-page non-fiction book by Bill Jenkinson published by Carroll & Graf Publishers in March 2007. As of December 2007, its first printing had sold over 10,000 copies. According to the introduction, the book is not a new Babe Ruth biography. Rather, it is a factual treatise of Ruth's power and his dominance of the game of baseball.

In an unprecedented look at Babe Ruth's amazing batting power, sure to inspire debate among baseball fans of every .

Hit 104 Home Runs : Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger. However, the fun begins with the comparisons of every candidate slugger in the history of baseball and the projection of Ruth into today's game.

The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs : Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger. Part of Jenkinson's book details Ruth's "hidden career" of exhibition games. Jenkinson calculates that Ruth participated in 800 exhibition games in six countries, 42 states and more than 200 cities. He blasted more than 300 homers in those games.

is a 432 page non fiction book by Bill Jenkinson published by Carroll Graf . The book is in three major sections. The career section is devoted to year by year recaps of Babe Ruth's career.

is a 432 page non fiction book by Bill Jenkinson published by Carroll Graf Publishers in March of 2007. The first section is called Part 1: The Career. The second section is Part Two: The Analysis. The third section is Part Three: The Facts. It starts in 1914 and runs through Ruth's final season in 1935. Each chapter features personal highlights and picks out the longest home runs Ruth hit.

Bill Jenkinson is the World's Leading Authority on Long Distance Home Runs & Home .

Bill Jenkinson is the World's Leading Authority on Long Distance Home Runs & Home Run Sluggers. He's Written Two Landmark Books on These Topics: The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs & Baseball's Ultimate Power.

Bill Jenkinson: The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger, Carroll .

Bill Jenkinson: The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs: Recrowning Baseball's Greatest Slugger, Carroll & Graf Publishers, New York, NY, 2007. Bill Jenkinson: Baseball's Ultimate Power: Ranking the All-Time Greatest Distance Home Run Hitters, Lyons Press, Guilford, CT, 2010. Bill Jenkinson: Baseball. php?title Bill Jenkinson&oldid 798359".

In an unprecedented look at Babe Ruth’s amazing batting power, sure to inspire debate among baseball fans of every .

In an unprecedented look at Babe Ruth's amazing batting power, sure to inspire debate among baseball fans of every stripe, one of the country's most respected and trusted baseball historians reveals the amazing conclusions of more than twenty years of research. Jenkinson takes readers through Ruth's 1921 season, in which his pattern of battled balls would have accounted for more than 100 home runs in today's ballparks and under today's rules. Yet, 1921 is just tip of the iceberg, for Jenkinson's research reveals that during an era of mammoth field dimensions Ruth hit more 450-plus-feet shots than anybody in history, and the conclusions one can draw are mind boggling.

Comments

Steelrunner Steelrunner
The Year Babe Ruth hit 104 Home Runs is simply spectacular. For whatever reason (perhaps meriting a book in itself), it seems Baseball fans study, know and quote their favorite statistics more than fans of any other sport. As such, it is only natural that from baseball came all those statistical things now common in other sports such as the Box Score, Lifetime and Season percentage statistics and now Sabermetrics. And because baseball is the Original American team sport, both anecdotal and statistical records exist for it since before the Civil War - Baseball was over half a century old, and common to all American cities, towns and villages before the invention of any of the other major team sports, and played in an organized professional League nearly a half century before any other sport could make the same claim. Because of this long. long history, the heroes and legends of Baseball are strung-out along America's timeline much like the list of American Presidents: Cap Anson, Dan Brouthers, Willie Keeler, Cy Young, Napoleon Lajoie, Willie Keeler, Sam Crawford, Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb - All starting their professional careers well over a century ago. When names more familiar to the casual fan are added such as Babe Ruth, Lour Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Ted Williams, Stan Musial, Hank Greenberg, Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays, Mickey Mantle, Hank Aaron, Reggie Jackson, Johnny Bench, Tony Gwynn, and yes even Mark McGuire, Sammy Sosa, and Barry Bonds, the history of baseball itself and the meaning of various events and feats are almost as difficult to comprehend and compare as a general American History student may have in understanding the significance of the Boston Tea Party, the Great Compromise, the Dred Scott Decision, the Spanish-American War, or even the New Deal. Well, when it comes to Babe Ruth, a name anyone who has ever wanted to watched a baseball game will at least have heard mentioned his feats are so storied that modern sceptics probably assume they are pure myth, greatly exaggerated, or that accurate records and record keeping had much to be desired 'way back then'. What Bill Jenkinson has done in this book is to not only destroy those sceptics precepts, but also transform the Babe's ancient statistics into flesh and bone factual recounting that ring as interesting and exciting today as when they first occurred. After reading this book, no one - and I mean NO ONE - could seriously argue against Ruth being the greatest baseball player who ever played the game. So gargantuan, so enormous, so Ruthian are his feats that no fiction writer could think-up a more powerful baseball hero. What's more, his attention to detail and recovery of old facts show that by modern standards, Ruth's feats are Understated by almost as large a margin as current Baseball stars feats are overstated. If we could somehow transport Ruth in his Prime to the modern era, and allow him all the modern benefits of scientific medicine and fitness, the professionally honed advice of modern baseball trainers and coaches, the convenience of modern air travel, luxury hotel accommodations, and the relative coziness of modern ballparks it is impossible to imagine the Star Wars numbers he would generate. Given just a decade in the modern era, he would probably shatter by a hundred Barry Bonds/Hank Aaron's HR number, to say nothing of the Runs, RBIs, Slugging Percent, and OBPS; and maybe even unthrone Cobb for Average. Indeed, if Erich Von Daniken was a Baseball fan and read this book, he would probably make an argument that Ruth had been abducted by aliens and had been infused with some sort of Super-Human DNA. As a 10 year-old kid one of my first 'adult' book purchases was the Baseball Encyclopedia, which I read and studied all the time with joy. It was a must have for any serious baseball fan. To that I would add just two books: The Glory of Their Times by Lawrence Ritter, and The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs. You will find yourself referring to it almost as much as the other two.
Siratius Siratius
I learned a lot from this book, not only about Babe Ruth but about early 20th Century baseball. I've had several discussions with people since I've read it where I've referenced the book about various ballparks, the number of exhibition games teams played, and how accurately we can estimate past home run distances.

There is a tendency to think that modern players are much better than their predecessors. In many cases that might be true, but I don't think it is true with Babe Ruth.
Cktiell Cktiell
I had this book on my kindle but the format of this book needed to be seen as an actual book, nothing against my kindle just a matter of preference. The delivery was great and as described by seller. This is one of the best books on Babe Ruth and presented from a bases not considered and prove his greatness has no equal.
Damand Damand
Highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Babe Ruth, the greatest American cultural icon of the 20th century, or with an interest in the baseball history. This well-written and well-researched book documents what many of Babe's contemporaries, including Hall-of-Famers, said about him: "No one like him". Most interesting to me is the documentation of the size of the ballparks that Babe used to play in and hit home runs out of. When I hear modern-day baseball fans compare modern ballplayers to Ruth and say the moderns are better, they clearly don't know about the differences between modern baseball and Ruthian-era baseball that made it -much- more difficult to hit home runs during Ruth's career. This book analyzes those differences, with a particular emphasis on ballpark size. Center-field fences averaged 490 feet from home plate, with some such as Shibe Park in Philly exceeding 500 feet. During Barry Bonds's 73-homer season in 2001, his longest homer was 462 feet, and most of Bonds' homers would have been loud outs in Ruth's day. Ruth regularly hit 500+ foot home runs, which is very rare among today's sluggers, even those players known to have used steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs. Ruth is truly unique and, by far, the greatest baseball player of all time. There never was, and never will be, anyone else like him.
riki riki
The author did a incredible amount of research on the subject. His documentation of Ruth's power is amazing. He compares Ruth's production to the modern home run sluggers Bonds and McGuire. An interesting section discusses todays baseball enviornment with that of Ruth's era. Quite significant are the dimensions of those ballparks with what we have today as well as the ground rules that often turned what today would be a home run into a double or triple back then. Todays players enjoy the lifestyle comforts of planes and airconditioning that were not available then. Exercise,diet and physical conditioning are much more advanced now. Ruth played over 800 exhibition games in his day. Though the book can be tedious at times the message is clear. Ruth was the greatest slugger of all time. It makes you wish you could have seen one of those massive drives.
PanshyR PanshyR
I've read over a dozen boooks about Babe Ruth. This book is different, and it's great. It covers aspects of Babe Ruth that none of the other books do. Unfortuneately, the pictures don't display well on a kindle (and I have the big kindle), and the "spray diagrams" are virtually unreadable. I own stock in Amazon, I want the kindle to be a success, but it has its limitations. For the money I could have gotten the paperback book, but I'm trying to get used to using the kindle. That's the only reason I give it 4 stars instead of 5.
Prince Persie Prince Persie
This is a classic, I keep getting new copies because I have been loaning my copies to people, and of course I do not get them back. This book is well researched. Jenkinson crafts this with good writing as well. Babe Ruth is the greatest player baseball has given the world and he just didn't hit.