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eBook The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-Ryu ePub

eBook The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-Ryu ePub

by Alanna Higaonna,Morio Higaonna

  • ISBN: 0946062366
  • Category: Individual Sports
  • Subcategory: Outdoors Sport
  • Author: Alanna Higaonna,Morio Higaonna
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dragon Books; 2nd edition (2001)
  • Pages: 220
  • ePub book: 1931 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1923 kb
  • Other: doc mbr mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 381

Description

Higaonna also taught karate at his high school karate club, completely filling his days with his passion. Morio Higaonna doesn't write bad books. Along with this book, there is is 4 volume set of Goju-ryu technical books that are great reference material

Higaonna also taught karate at his high school karate club, completely filling his days with his passion. In 1960 Higaonna moved to Tokyo to attend Takushoku University. His passion for karate continued to drive him and during his free time he would visit various dojos around the Tokyo area. Along with this book, there is is 4 volume set of Goju-ryu technical books that are great reference material. He obviously cares how he is perceived by people reading his work and takes great care that his name is attached to only quality material. What I love about this book is that it is well written, very clear with a good index.

Okinawan Goju-ryu Karate-do Association of Moldova - IOGKF). This photograph, taken at the Higaonna Dojo in Tsuboya, Okinawa, demonstrates the importance that senior Goju Ryu practitioners place in body conditioning and strengthening. This is a vital part of the legacy of Chojun Miyagi, and something that shouid be part of every karateka's training regime. AII hojo undo shouid be practiced often in conjunction with Sanchin Kata. Without hojo undo practice it is very difficult to obtain the required strength to perform Goju Ryu kata applications, and most likely the karate-ka's Sanchin Kata will remain weak.

Morio Higaonna (東恩納 盛男 Higaonna Morio, born December 25, 1938) is a prominent Okinawan karate practitioner who is the founder and former Chief Instructor of the International Okinawan Goju-ryu Karate-do Federation (IOGKF). He is a holder of the highest rank in Goju-ryu karate, 10th dan. Higaonna has written several books on Goju-ryu karate, including Traditional Karate-do: Okinawa Goju Ryu (1985) and The history of Karate: Okinawan Goju Ryu (2001).

Morio Higaonna, Naha-shi, Okinawa. Mo ichi do! This page is dedicated to Morio Higaonna Shihan and is NOT run by him personally.

The History of Karate book. The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-Ryu

The History of Karate book. The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-Ryu. 0946062366 (ISBN13: 9780946062362).

The History of Karate: Okinawan Goju-Ryu by Morio Higaonn. What others are saying. oju Ryu Karate Ishikawa Dojo Aikido Martial Arts Books Book Cover Art Miyagi Okinawa Kanazawa.

Morio Higaonna (Higaonna Morio, born December 25, 1938) is a prominent Okinawan karate practitioner who is the founder and Chief Instructor of the International Okinawan Goju-ryu Karate-do Federation (IOGKF). Higaonna has written several books on Goju-ryu karate, including Traditional. Karate-do: Okinawa Goju Ryu (1985) and The history of Karate: Okinawan Goju Ryu (2001). Martial arts scholar Donn Draeger (1922–1982) reportedly once described him as "the most dangerous man in Japan in a real fight.

When you talk, you are only repeating what you already know. But if you listen, you may learn something new.

The result of decades of research into the history of Goju-ryu, "The History of Karate" is based on information Morio Higaonna gathered while training as a young student at the Garden Dojo of Chojun Miyagi, on hundreds of hours of interviews he conducted with senior Okinawan karateka, students, friends and relatives of both Chojun Miyagi and Kanryo Higaonna, and on personal research he carried out in China.

The book is of high quality and well illustrated. It is a treasure house of facts concerning the early history of Okinawan karate, descriptions of the early training and, best of all, it describes Chojun Miyagi’s ethical ideals, teaching methods and way of life, providing a valuable source of knowledge and understanding to guide the present day karateka.

This book should be on the shelf of every serious student of karate, and it should be read often.

Comments

showtime showtime
Be objective when reading. This is not a book on "the history of Goju ruy", nevertheless it does have some interesting information in it. Just read it critically.
Bodwyn Bodwyn
Chalk up another terrific book published by Dragon Books. Morio Higaonna's work (translated by his wife, Alanna Higaonna) does for goju ryu karate what Shoshin Nagamine's book "Tales of Okinawa's Great Masters" has done for shorin-ryu karate. Finally the rest of us have access to the thoughts of the surviving (at the time of publication) old time karate men. Higaonna has gone out of his way to locate the men who studied under Kanryu Higaonna and his top student, the humble and skilled Chojun Miyagi.
Higaonna relates the recollections of men like Seko Higa, Seisho Aniya, An'ich' Miyagi, Meitoku Yagi, Yoshimi (Gogen) Yamaguchi, Seiko Kina, Shichi Arakaki and many more. This volume is packed with valuable historic photos, and includes a number of tables which compare Okinawan, Fujian, and Mandarin names for forms and weapons. There is an appendix with a number of interesting referrences, including laws imposed upon Okinawa by the Satsuma clan after the Island came under japanese domination, and brief biographies of prominent figures whi influenced the development of Goju, such as White Crane Master Go Ken-ki. There is a glossary as well as an index. The only glaring error I found was in the index, where the names of Okinawan persons were cataloged by their first and not last names--evidently a computer error nobody caught.
For anyone with a driving interest in Okinawa karate or general Okinawa history, this is an important volume which should not be neglected. What a pleasure to read! Higaonna's 4 volume series, "Traditional Karate-Do: Okinawa Goju Ryu" volumes 1-4 is also highly recommended for those seeking a perfect technical guide.
Elildelm Elildelm
Morio Higaonna doesn't write bad books. Along with this book, there is is 4 volume set of Goju-ryu technical books that are great reference material. He obviously cares how he is perceived by people reading his work and takes great care that his name is attached to only quality material.
What I love about this book is that it is well written, very clear with a good index. It is well organized chronologically and the pictures are actually some that you haven't seen in other books and are interesting. There are pictures of Miyagi that I haven't seen before, as well as pictures of turn of the century China and Okinawa. It gives a great overview of how things looked and a generally good feeling of how things must have been at the time.
What I don't like about this book is that I find it biased in a few different ways. Some may be intentional to make the Goju-ryu style more historically and culturally significant that it actually is (not to say it isn't, but there's no need to twist the truth over it). Others are simply because of Higaonna's inexperience as a historian. He has done a lot of first hand digging in China and around Okinawa to get direct accounts from as many sources as possible. This is done well. The conclusions that he draws from the reports that he has are a little shaky at times however.
He will sometimes assert or dismiss a formerly accepted view because his instructor "would probably have told him if it were true" or "the teaching of Tote was done in secret at the time" with no supporting evidence. It would be better to say that he doesn't know, and leave it at that.
Despite these flaws, the book contains a lot of new information that has been researched directly by the author and people who worked with him. It represents a considerable amount of effort that created a book well worth your time.
Use_Death Use_Death
Gojo ryu, one of the main styles of karate on Okinawa, has benefited greatly from the expertise of Sensei Higaonna, the author of this well-researched book. He is a master technician of combat and also, in keeping with tradition, an accomplished man of letters. Thus he is a modern embodiment of the scholar/warrior that is held as the ideal in both Western and Asian cultures.

Concerning the text of his book, it is endorsed by a virtual "who's who" of Gojo-ryu. He covers in great detail, in an engaging style, the various aspects of martial arts on Okinawa and the surrounding islands, including the Chinese influence. After this general background, he goes into much detail with the history of Gojo-ryu's masters and influences, starting with Kanryo Higaonna and working his way to modern times. Some great photos add to Higaonna's gift of story-telling, including one that has in it, unlabelled, Shinpan Gusukuma of Shorin-ryu notoriety. This is worth noting since photos of him are uncommon (of course excluding a book of kata and kumite).

Overall, why this book demands to be read by serious karate historians is that the author conducted dozens of interviews over a thirty year period of people who had first hand knowledge of events that have otherwise failed to be printed in languages other than Japanese. Moreover, the author's own expertise in the Naha-style of karate gives him intimate knowledge of the subject matter from a technical aspect.

What I am left with after reading it for a second time, and this time during one sitting, is that Okinawan karate is very much related to the perfection of character, more so than is commonly discussed in dojo around the U.S. Almost all of the masters in this story are obsessed with right living. That means something, and more to me personally as I grow older.

I would recommend Mark Bishop's Okinawan Karate: Teachers, Styles and Secret Techniquesas a detailed, readable and usually accurate account of the major and minor traditions of Okinawan combat arts. Of course it is not entirely correct, but who can get that story right, especially a non-Okinawan? Gambatte!

Enjoy!