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eBook Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America ePub

eBook Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America ePub

by Adam Penenberg,Marc Barry,Adam L. Penenberg

  • ISBN: 0738202711
  • Category: Biography and History
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Adam Penenberg,Marc Barry,Adam L. Penenberg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (December 2000)
  • Pages: 188
  • ePub book: 1977 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1588 kb
  • Other: docx azw mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 767

Description

Электронная книга "Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America", Adam Penenberg, Marc Barry.

Электронная книга "Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America", Adam Penenberg, Marc Barry. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. 18) Forecast: With publication coming on the heels of the recent break-in at Microsoft, and a New York Times Magazine excerpt scheduled for December 3, Penenberg and Barry's deeply intriguing book is bound to get a lot of play and should wind up as one of the season's must-have reads.

by Adam L. Penenberg and Marc Barry. ISBN: 0738205931 Subtitle: Espionage in Corporate America Publisher: Perseus Books Group. Imagine your main business competitor building a satellite-equipped war room to secretly monitor your new ventures. Imagine your classified product prototype mysteriously landing on the market under the brand name belonging to your archrival. This isn’t a story line from the latest spy thriller, it’s modern-day corporate America. Spooked thrusts readers into a clandestine world-where business means war and information is worth stealing.

Dear Internet Archive Supporters, Thank you for helping us reach our fundraising goal. You keep us going and growing – with your support we will do even more in 2020. Happy New Year! –The Internet Archive Team. We’ve reached our goal! Dear Internet Archive Supporters, Thank you for helping us reach our fundraising goal.

In this page-burning exposé, Adam Penenberg and Marc Barry uncover and describe in thrilling detail the alarming regularity of espionage in industry. They offer an unsettling portrait of America's publicly traded companies, and unravel the truth and hypocrisy behind the multi-billion dollar corporate intelligence industry.

It doesn't really cover the topic of corporate espionage in America. Instead it focuses on one particular case. It doesn't really cover the topic of corporate espionage in America.

From Spooked: Espionage in Corporate America, by Adam L. Penenberg, Marc Barry. Used by permission of the publisher. Membership Advantages.

by Marc Barry and Adam L. Penenberg. Imagine your main business competitor building a satellite-equipped "war room" to secretly monitor your new ventures. Impossible? This isn't a story line from the latest spy thriller, it's modern-day corporate America.

Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America. Adam Penenberg, Marc Barry, Adam L. Penenberg

Spooked: Espionage In Corporate America. Gerard Rushton, Marc P. Armstrong, Josephine Gittler, Barry R. Greene, Claire E. Pavlik, Michele M. West, Dale L. Zimmerman. Category: Математика, Алгоритмы и структуры данных. 7 Mb. The right to religious liberty: the basic ACLU guide to religious rights. Barry W. Lynn, Marc D. Stern, Oliver S. Thomas.

Imagine your main business competitor building a world-class, satellite-equipped "war room" to secretly scope out and monitor your progress developing international ventures. Incredible? Imagine your classified product prototype mysteriously landing on the market under a brand name belonging to your archrival. Astounding? This isn't the story line from the latest John le Carré novel; this is modern-day corporate America--and it's full of secret agents and operatives, stealing and selling your intellectual property for profit. Peopled by riveting characters displaced from now defunct post-Cold War agencies, Spooked exposes a fascinating tapestry of real-life corporate spying occurring within publicly traded companies such as Dow Chemical, Avery Dennison, 3M, Sony, Motorola, and dozens of others. Adam Penenberg, top investigative journalist for Forbes, and Marc Barry, founder of a Manhattan-based corporate-intelligence agency, uncover and describe in thrilling detail some of the greatest corporate-espionage capers of all time. A brilliant exposé, Spooked unravels the truth and hypocrisy behind the multi-billion-dollar corporate-intelligence industry.

Comments

Yayrel Yayrel
I don't know why this short text is in hardcover, and as mentioned in the other reviews, it is more than a bit disjointed, and suffers from some flaws in research.
On the positive side, Chapters 4 & 5 are a useful description of social engineering, that can help the reader better understand how vulnerable an organization is to simple information gathering techniques. It is difficult to find material on the subject of 'Information Brokers', so this book provides a useful source on that subject, although no specific topic is covered in depth.
I found Fialka's book, "War By Other Means," a more informative and interesting read. Fialka's book doesn't discuss the Avery case which comprises the greater part of "Spooked," so the books are somewhat complementary if you are looking for additional examples of industrial espionage.
"Spooked" is a quick read, and outside of some structural weaknesses in its organization, it is an enjoyable enough text. It is more of a 'popular' approach to this subject, aimed at the casual reader who is more interested in titillation than in substance.
EROROHALO EROROHALO
I bought this book wanted to learn a little bit about corporate espionage but didn't really find anything too intriguing about it.

Penenberg gives examples of cases where espionage was used to extract information but doesn't go into a lot of details which would help the reader what was going on. In chapters 5 or 6 he tells the story about competing frozen pizza makers. He goes on to say how someone extracted some information from employees but never tells the reader how that information really could have been used. It would have been nice to include a extra few paragraphs explaining how the information obtained was actually used to benefit the "client".
Walan Walan
In spite of the promises on the back cover, flyleaf, and publisher, this book consists of nothing more than the story of one corporate espionage case, and a decidedly low-tech one at that. Sprinkled between chapters filled with excruciatingly repetitive and frankly boring details of the Avery espionage case, are several mildly interesting profiles of so-called corporate spooks, whose techniques range from "oh, I can do all kinds of stuff, but it's so secret I can't tell you" to "I go to trade shows and ask people questions" Reading the book, one gets the impression that the author may indeed have heard all kinds of cool stuff during his research, but none of it found its way into the pages of this book. This would've made a killer magazine article, but the book's just not there.
Xor Xor
By focusing on a single case (Avery Dennison/Four Pillars) the author then attempts to spiral out to other examples, many surface-only stories and "anonymous" source tales. There are many opinions and tactics in this field so reading one book will never be enough. One useful takeaway from this book is exactly what the focus of the main case is: glue. Not microchips, not missile systems, but glue. Interesting in the area of industrial espionage is what ends up being a target may surprise most people. Most people have no clue what "complex fluids", how deeply their lives are impacted by them daily, or how much money is spent developing them. Use this book as a case study or companion to other works but not as a main source of information about this field. Interesting but certainly not a training manual.
Cetnan Cetnan
Does not really go into details as expected, very broad strokes book that is lacking substance, I feel like I read a very weak fictional book.
Broadraven Broadraven
I picked up this thin hardback as a remaindered item, and it was worth what I paid for it. The book is about corporate espionage (and the field of "competitive intelligence") by a journalist and a practitioner, respectively. The bulk of the book tells the story of Victor Lee, an employee of the Avery Dennison company, who was the first person to be prosecuted under the U.S. Economic Espionage Act for selling company secrets to First Pillars, a company in his native Taiwan. The book's account of that case seems quite balanced, with due weight given to the defense (which ultimately failed, and apparently rightly so). This story is spread throughout the nine chapters (1, 3, 6, and 8 of the book's 9), in a somewhat disjointed fashion.

The book also describes the founding of the Society for Competitive Intelligence Professionals and the competitive intelligence group at Motorola by former CIA analyst Jan Herring, a case where Schwann's obtained competitive intelligence via legitimate means to compete with Kraft in pizza manufacturing, another chapter on legitimate intelligence gathering by Teltech to find out about nanotechnology development of plastics for Dow, and a very different chapter on eEye "Chief Hacking Officer" Marc Maiffret.

The book seems to have two voices about the ethics standards of SCIP, with co-author Barry thinking that the standards are hypocritical and rightly ignored, while it appears that Panenberg may be more sympathetic.

There doesn't seem to be much in the book in the way of conclusions drawn in the book. It could have been more useful with a summary of methods to prevent espionage, more details on principles of legitimate intelligence gathering, or at least lessons learned from specific cases.