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eBook A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalization ePub

eBook A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalization ePub

by Adrian Wooldridge,John Micklethwait

  • ISBN: 060961083X
  • Category: Economics
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Adrian Wooldridge,John Micklethwait
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press (August 14, 2001)
  • Pages: 386
  • ePub book: 1472 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1664 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 198

Description

Now John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge weigh in with the response I prayed for. A Future Perfect fills a. .

Now John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge weigh in with the response I prayed for. A Future Perfect fills a yawning void with a magisterial case for the most powerful-and on earth: globalization. A Future Perfect has taken up the challenge of translating the many aspects of globalization into human and understandable terms. It is a convincing, even-handed, often witty defense and will do much to clarify this often misunderstood "revolution" of the new century.

Also by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge THE WITCH DOCTORS: MAKING SENSE OF THE . Conclusion – The Hidden Promise: Liberty Renewed. The Priority of Liberty.

Also by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge THE WITCH DOCTORS: MAKING SENSE OF THE MANAGEMENT GURUS THE COMPANY: A SHORT HISTORY OF A REVOLUTIONARY IDEA A Future Perfect A Future. and. Adrian Wooldridge. Random house trade paperbacks.

The authors, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, correspondents for "The .

The authors, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, correspondents for "The Economist," won the Financial Times/Booz Allen Hamilton Global Business Book Award on Strategy and Leadership for their previous collaboration, The Witch Doctors.

Micklethwait, John; Wooldridge, Adrian. 1. The Fall and Rise of Globalization - pt. 2. The Three Engines of Globalization. Technology as Freedom. 5. Sex, Death, and the Welfare State - pt. 3. One World: The Business of Globalization. 6. The Five Myths of Globalization. 7. Managing in a Global Age - pt. 4. The Politics of Interdependence.

Micklethwait is the co-author of several books with Adrian Wooldridge, including . A Future Perfect: the Challenge and Hidden Promise of Globalisation (2000).

Micklethwait is the co-author of several books with Adrian Wooldridge, including: The Witch Doctors (1996). The Company - A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea (2003). The Right Nation: A Study of Conservatism in America (2004). The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race To Reinvent The State (2014) References.

John Micklethwait, Adrian Wooldridge. A Future Perfect is the first comprehensive examination of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives. He has won a Wincott Award for financial journalism. He has appeared on NPR and the BBC and written for the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, and The New York Times.

A Future Perfect" is the first comprehensive examination of globalization and how it will continue to change lives. The best book on globalization! By Thriftbooks. com User, June 4, 2004. As a result, the notion of comparative advantages are becoming far more frequent.

amp; Wooldridge, Adrian. A future perfect : the challenge and hidden promise of globalization. and Wooldridge, Adrian. A future perfect : the challenge and hidden promise of globalization, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge Heinemann London 2000. Australian/Harvard Citation. amp; Wooldridge, Adrian.

A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization. A FUTURE PERFECT is the first comprehensive evaluation of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives. A FUTURE PERFECT is the first comprehensive evaluation of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives

Having established their credibility when it comes to Ideas both global and revolutionary, they now double down with The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State.

A Future Perfect is the first comprehensive examination of the most important revolution of our time--globalization--and how it will continue to change our lives. The authors, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, correspondents for The Economist, won the Financial Times/Booz Allen Hamilton Global Business Book Award on Strategy and Leadership for their previous collaboration, The Witch Doctors. In A Future Perfect, Micklethwait and Wooldridge expand their field of vision in order to analyze, demystify, and expose the global forces reshaping our world, and they detail both the challenge and the hidden promise those forces hold for individuals, businesses, and governments.Do businesses benefit from going global? Are we creating winner-take-all societies? Will globalization seal the triumph of junk culture? What will happen to individual careers? Gathering evidence from the shantytowns of São Paolo to the boardroom of General Electric, from the troubled Russia-Estonia border to the booming San Fernando Valley sex industry, Micklethwait and Wooldridge mount a powerful, witty, levelheaded defense of globalization. Along the way, the authors introduce us to the cosmocrats--the members of the elite business, information, and diplomatic class who are creating the new world order. They also identify the three engines of globalization and describe how people are managing and governing in an increasingly global era. As they did in The Witch Doctors, the authors also brilliantly puncture myths and conventional wisdom, separating false hopes from emerging realities.Incisive, expansive, and optimistic, A Future Perfect is an illuminating tour of the global economy and a fascinating assessment of its potential impact.From the Hardcover edition.

Comments

Iraraeal Iraraeal
This book offers some ideas that I had not seen before.
For one thing, it is rare to see a book that is pro-globalization that discusses it as fragile and in need of nurturing. It is generally referred to as an overwhelming tide that either must be embraced or stopped.
The book discusses the results of globalization in several industries, and it takes the economic perspective that comparative advantage will continue to operate. But it goes beyond that and discusses the loosers as well as the winners.
The most interesting idea I found in the book was it's discussion of what they call "cosmocrats." An elite that is without geographic identity and more bound to others of their class than to their traditional communities. The book "Bowling Alone" documents the breakdown of traditional social networks. It is easy to see in Silicon Valley's libertarian culture the people who feel they are "self made" and do not feel a need for reciprocal relationships with their geographic communities. This belief, of course, is totally without foundation. However, the belief that a technical elite should run society has been tired in Germany, Russia and other places with horrible results. The books does not go so far as to raise that type of alarm, but the dislocation that they document is well worth considering.
Zaryagan Zaryagan
This is a wonderful piece of work. It systematically looks at Globalization from a number of perspectives. While some of the conclusions are a bit outlandish - the research is sound. If you want to understand the dynamics of the economy without a lot of economic blather - this is the book.
There are loads of numbers - some good down to earth examples plus a lot of excellent thinking on the implications for all of us - what does the long term nature of connectedness imply.
An alternative would be to look at The Invisible Continent by Kenichi Ohmae.
BlackHaze BlackHaze
Reading this book is the closest experience to reading a 370-page Economist issue. It is more like a collection of essays than the ordinary book, yet the case presented is strong--take nothing for granted. It will be an interesting re-read in a few years.
SadLendy SadLendy
I bought it last month for my article about globalization. So I examined this book, while I was preparing my paper. I learned new side of view about globalization.

Thanks a lot
Dilmal Dilmal
I approached reading this book with the assumption that I would viscerally dislike it: I hate popular culture; I consider myself, at best, to be a technological agnostic; and my impression was the "globalization" is being generated by international-business buccaneers. However, I discovered that John Micklethwait and Adrian Woolridge, correspondents for The Economist, are adept popularizers of complicated contemporary concepts; they share a certain sense of humor; and, while championing globalization's purported benefits, they are willing to acknowledge some of its more serious problems. This book is, therefore, a solid, if not compelling, introduction to the subject.
Micklethwait and Woolridge do not offer dispassionate analysis of globalization and its impact on international business, politics, and culture. Indeed, the authors are advocates, and they are candid about their biases, declaring: "[T]he underlying message of this book is that globalization needs not merely to be understood but to be defended." The reason, according to Micklethwait and Woolridge, is: "Globalization has become, quite simply, the most important economic, political, and cultural phenomenon of our time." That's probably hyperbole, but, without debating that point, the first issue is: What is globalization? In its most basic terms, globalization is the trend toward integration of the world economy into a single market. And what drives globalization? Micklethwait and Woolridge answer: Technology, the capital markets, and management. They might have added: International financial institutions. According to Micklethwait and Woolridge, "it is certainly true that many important decisions about the world economy have been made by a small cabal of technocrats at four institutions in Washington, D.C.: the World Bank, the IMF, the U.S. Treasury, and the Federal Reserve Board." Nevertheless, the process of globalization still has a long way to go. According to Micklethwait and Woolridge: "Consultants at McKinsey reckon that only a fifth of world outputs, or $6 trillion out of $28 trillion, is open to global competition in products, service, or ownership." The issue is whether this is a good thing. Micklethwait and Woolridge seek to dispel the following "myths" about globalization: (1) it is leading to the triumph of big companies; (2) it is ushering in an age of global products; (3) it has ended the traditional business cycle; (4) it is a zero-sum game (some people have to lose in order for others to win); and (5) geography does not matter in the new global economy. The authors also reject various criticisms of globalization, including the allegations that it contributes to "the rise of homogenized airport culture;" that it involves the "loss of democratic accountability;" that "countries ruin themselves by reducing taxes, benefits, and environmental controls in order to woo rootless companies;" and that it is epitomized by the "weakness of global institutions such as the United Nations." The book is full of anecdotes, some of which are quite revealing. However, anecdote is not argument, and some of the authors' anecdotes in defense of globalization are simply exceptions to accurate generalizations. Micklethwait and Woolridge also tend to make profound statements of the obvious. For example: "The full impact of events that took place roughly a decade ago, such as the collapse of the iron curtain and the introduction of Europe's single market, is only just beginning to be felt." On the other hand, Micklethwait and Woolridge occasionally display genuine insight. According to Micklethwait and Woolridge: "Much of the globalizing drive and energy of multinationals is provided by the management industry: the business schools, consultancies, and gurus." Are we certain we want these people and institutions creating the dominant ideology of the post-Cold War world? The authors give us further reason to pause and ponder when they write at some length about "cosmocrats," whom they define as the class of people "who have benefitted from globalization." Their description of this class includes the observations that they are "[c]osmopolitan in taste," "usually Anglo-American in outlook," and preach a "gospel of wealth." The authors then declare: "These people constitute perhaps the most meritocratic ruling class the world has seen." In my opinion, the cosmocrats sound like just another elite. The fact that they have mastered the international economy - which is the basis for their self-interested conclusion that their ascendancy is based on meritocracy - does not give them a moral right to rule. Micklethwait and Woolridge observe that the "cosmocrats are increasingly cut off from the rest of society," and the authors express this concern: "One of the great risks of globalization is that it fosters anomie - the normalness that comes from having your ties with the rest of society weakened...The most common complaint among Internet addicts" is that they are "isolated, lonely, and depressed." I was not persuaded by the concluding chapter, entitled "The Hidden Promise: Liberty Renewed." According to Micklethwait and Woolridge, the "belief in individualism, which was at the heart of both the Enlightenment and the American Revolution, was actually a fairly global movement." According to Micklethwait and Woolridge, "the recent history of globalization can be written as a story...of spreading a political culture that is based on individual liberty" Even if that is an accurate statement of the cosmocrats' ideology, there is no guarantee that they will prove to be good global citizens. In fact, the cosmocrats may already have failed their first test: Micklethwait and Woolridge acknowledge that "globalization has certainly been a mixed blessing for the environment."
In the final analysis, I am concerned about the prospect of building a global community based on an ideology that exalts exuberant (and sometimes rapacious) individualism. Micklethwait and Woolridge are globalization advocates, and they are at their strongest when they discuss economic matters. They clearly believe that it will be the key organizing principle for 21st-century business, but I remain skeptical about globalization's impact on international politics and culture. Nevertheless, I am glad that I read this book and then spent some time thinking about its powerful thesis. I believe we now need a serious, non-Luddite, left-liberal critique of globalization.
Jube Jube
The main point of this book - with which I fully agree - is that globalization is hardly a new phenomenon. Most, if not even more, aspects of the current globalization also existed a century ago. Indeed, you might be forgiven for thinking that the free movement of people - emigration - in the world was arguably more global then than it is now. So the process is not new but it feels new, Why?. For starters it's only been slightly over ten years since the fall of Communism and the unfettered resurgence of the free market as the unquestionably dominant economic ideology. Nontheless, the process also feels new because most of us are still reluctant to concede authority to extranational bodies and institutions while national politics still operates in self contained systems. The main point is this, and it is my principal compalint about globalization, international or global power is still mostly limited to the financial markets and multinational corporations and less to supranational bodies like the EU. meanwhile, as we are ever in search of the best product and brand there is the job insecurity that results Fiom greater foreign competition and the cultural hegemony of the United States.