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eBook A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia (Revised and Updated) ePub

eBook A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia (Revised and Updated) ePub

by Blaine Harden

  • ISBN: 0393342565
  • Category: Economics
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Blaine Harden
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Revised and Updated edition (April 2, 2012)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1296 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1855 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 569

Description

Blaine Harden, an award-winning journalist, is a contributor to The Economist and a former foreign correspondent for the Washington Post. In depth history of the Columbia basin project and the building of the dams on the river.

Blaine Harden, an award-winning journalist, is a contributor to The Economist and a former foreign correspondent for the Washington Post. He lives in Seattle, Washington. Paperback: 288 pages. Extensive analysis of the ecological impact of the changed river system. The authors deep understanding and professional journalists eye make for a great read. 2 people found this helpful.

Электронная книга "A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia (Revised and Updated)", Blaine Harden. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia (Revised and Updated)" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Washington Post Book World After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river

Washington Post Book World After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation

After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river.

After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation.

Washington Post Book WorldAfter two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. Tell us if something is incorrect. We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.

As Blaine Harden traveled the Columbia-by barge, car, and sometimes on foot-his past seemed both foreign and familiar. A major part of the book is a river journey that Harden takes on barges moving merchandise down the Snake and Columbia Rivers between the dams. A personal narrative of rediscovery joined a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once-wild river now tamed to puddled remains. Harden describes people and places exquisitely, and I could imagine each captain’s appearance and personality, as well as the feel of being on a craft with significant tonnage and limited steering/stopping capacity. A personal narrative of rediscovery joined a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once wild river now tamed to puddled remains.

Washington Post Book WorldAfter two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden. Although Harden often blames locals for the decline in salmon, and at other times, the government, I found it to be a fair look at both sides of the story.

As Blaine Harden traveled the Columbia-by barge, car, and sometimes on foot-his past seemed both foreign and familiar

As Blaine Harden traveled the Columbia-by barge, car, and sometimes on foot-his past seemed both foreign and familiar.

"Superbly reported and written with clarity, insight, and great skill." ―Washington Post Book World

After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation. A River Lost is a searing personal narrative of rediscovery joined with a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once-wild river. Updated throughout, this edition features a new foreword and afterword. 7 maps

Comments

Mavegar Mavegar
This was required reading for my PNW History class. I expected it to be a boring factual book, but I was pleasantly surprised. It is a great book if you want to know the truth about the dams on the Columbia and the deceptions of our government. What an eye opener for me. Anyone interested in why and how they are there should read this book.
Nikojas Nikojas
I have lived near the SNAKE AND COLUMBIA RIVERS all my Life. This book was highly recommended and it is wonderful

.must read.
Timberahue Timberahue
A horror story of government incompetence special interests, crooked politicians, and bureaucracy run amok.
post_name post_name
A fabulous review of all the historic and modern day players on the Columbia River. This book shows the complexity of aquatic resource management and the impacts of short-sited development. A great read for anyone interested in the Columbia River basin or regional environmental planning.
Coiriel Coiriel
Well written. Informative. AT a minimum it should be required reading in all high schools in WA and OR. Ideally, it should be read by everyone who is concerned about protecting wild life, the rights of Indians, the history of cancer in specific geographic areas, holding government agencies accountable, and ....
Fordrellador Fordrellador
A great reporter and writer tells the story of how one of America's greatest wild rivers was transformed into a series of puddles. I am very grateful to Mr. Harden for rescuing this story from obscurity. We tend to accept the dams on the Columbia as part of the natural landscape --- and they aren't.
Dagdage Dagdage
My favorite book. Well written. Read it.
In depth history of the Columbia basin project and the building of the dams on the river. Extensive analysis of the ecological impact of the changed river system. The authors deep understanding and professional journalists eye make for a great read.