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eBook Engels After Marx ePub

eBook Engels After Marx ePub

by Manfred B. Steger,Terrell Carver

  • ISBN: 0719056527
  • Category: Economics
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Manfred B. Steger,Terrell Carver
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penn State Press (August 19, 1999)
  • Pages: 232
  • ePub book: 1811 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1833 kb
  • Other: lit docx mbr rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 293

Description

Crazy Clouds: Zen radicals, rebels, and reformers, by Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Shambhala, 1991.

Manfred B. Steger is Assistant Professor of Politics at Illinois State University and the author of The Quest for Evolutionary Socialism: Eduard . Terrell Carver is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bristol, England. Steger is Assistant Professor of Politics at Illinois State University and the author of The Quest for Evolutionary Socialism: Eduard Bernstein and Social Democracy (Cambridge, 1997).

Engels after Marx attests both to the legacy of this political philosopher for contemporary left thought and to the legacy of Marxist socialism in the wake of upheavals in international Communism. Manfred B. Terrell Carver is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bristol, England

Manfred B. Steger & Terrell Carver (ed. - 1999 - Pennsylvania State University Press. Marx & Engels: The Intellectual Relationship. Terrell Carver - 1985 - Science and Society 49 (2):249-251. The Communist Manifesto New Interpretations. Mark Cowling, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels & Terrell Carver - 1998. The Intellectual Relationship. Terrell Carver, Gerard Bekerman & Cecil L. Eubanks - 1986 - Studies in Soviet Thought 31 (4):329-334. Engels a Very Short Introduction. Terrell Carver - 2003. Terrell Carver - 1981 - Hill & Wang

Manfred B. Steger, Terrell Carver. One hundred years after the death of Friedrich Engels, the longtime colleague of Karl Marx continues to influence the thought of socialist thinkers. This critical reappraisal of Engels addresses his relevance after both the death of Marx and the decline of Marxism, bringing Engels out from under the shadow of Marx to show the theoretical significance and historical impact of his wide-ranging criticisms for philosophy, science, political economy, history, and socialist politics.

Engels After Marx book. Terrell Carver is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bristol, England

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Find nearly any book by Manfred B. ISBN 9780271024851 (978-0-271-02485-1) Softcover, Penn State University Press, 2004. Find signed collectible books: 'Engels After Marx'. Engels After Marx: ISBN 9780271024851 (978-0-271-02485-1) Softcover, Penn State University Press, 2004. Globalism: Market Ideology Meets Terrorism (Globalization).

University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999.

Crazy Clouds: Zen radicals, rebels, and reformers, by Perle Besserman and Manfred Steger, Shambhala, 1991.

This collection of essays offers a critical reappraisal of Friederich Engels, a pivotal figure of the classical European labour movement. It deals with Engels "after" Marx in several senses. Chronologically and thematically, the authors examine the main aspects of Engel's social thought after the end of his 40-year intellectual relationship with Marx. Politically, the collection attempts to make sense of Engels's legacy in the aftermath of the 1989-1991 revolutions in Europe. The essays search for new readings of Engels's texts. In the spirit of a genuinely "critical" theory, the authors pursue Engels's errors and omissions, uncover his rhetorical manoeuvres, and point to insights and conclusions in his thought that appear to have withstood the test of time. The guiding questions for the book are: what is the nature of Engels's role as an independent socialist thinker after Marx's death in 1883? What is the theoretical significance and the historical impact of his wide-ranging contributions to philosophy, science, political economy, history and socialist politics? And what is Engel's intellectual and political legacy for the era "after Marx"?

Comments

Dagdalas Dagdalas
As a preface to my review, I should state that in 1991 Yale University Press published my _The Life and Thought of Friedrich Engels: A Reinterpretation_ in which I strongly disagreed with the views of a number of scholars whom I dubbed dichotomists because they argued that there were significant disagreements between the ideas and writings of Engels and Marx. The following year English scholar S. H. Rigby published _Engels and the formation of Marxism_, in which he independently arrived at a similar interpretation to mine, that Marx and Engels were in substantial agreement. Also in 1992, Terrell Carver, one of the editors of _Engels after Marx_ and one of the 'dichotomists, wrote a highly critical, even scathing review of both books. To his credit, Carver, along with Manfred B. Steger, has included an article by Rigby in this volume of essays. They even call my own arguments about Engels's dialecticel materialism "plausible." They also use my term "dichotomist" and quote from my book, as do several of the other essays.

I am grateful for this recognition, but I have to say that the collection of articles in this book is quite uneven. The variety of viewpoints represented in it is useful to scholars in helping them understand how diverse those viewpoints are. For general readers, however, I have to say that the book is not, for the most part, very readable and that many of the essays use highly technical terminology that is too often not explained.

From my point of view, Paul Thomas's "Engels and 'Scientific Socialism' " is the least helpful in the volume. I does have the virtue of arguing the original dichotomist view that Engels's ideas varied significantly from Marx's, a view that the editors classify as "controversial." But it does so without considering the significant evidence against that argument that Rigby and I offer. It does not even include our books in its brief bibliography, the latest work in which is a book by Carver in 1989. I think it is not unfair to call this particular essay outdated.

Rigby's article, _Engels After Marx: History_, may not be the best in the collection, but it includes what I regard as the most telling comment. After pointing out that both Marx and Engels wrote a huge amount of material over a long period, he says: "By selective quotation, one can easily show that [they] disagreed fundamentally on most issues," as Thomas argues. But, Rigby states, "We have been taught to read for the 'best Marx' . . .; we must now learn not to read for the 'worst Engels.' "

There are other excellent essays in this book on a variety of topics relating to Engels and Marx, and as I have suggested, the introduction is fair and does a fine job of setting the scene. Anyone wanting to understand the intellectual relationship of Engels and Marx should consult _Engels After Marx_, but readers not already acquainted with the terminology used in connection with the subject must not expect to find the contents to be easy reading. Recommended mainly for scholars.

J. D. Hunley
Zamo Zamo
Engels' Condition of the Working Class in England is one of the great studies of capitalism, and initiated the early Marx into the study of political economy. These essays tell the tale of the endgame, the fate of the vehicle created by Marx so soon frittered away in the period of Engels, in the ambiguities of Hegelianism, the dialectic as science, and the dangers or blessings of revisionism. Echoes of Norman Levine's The Tragic Deception force the question of Engels betraying the fine edge of the original theoretical Marxism, fair or not, and an egregious issue to those who find the real and deeper flaws in Marx's foundations. This version, however of the seminal Marx and the reifying Engels does not quite match the deeper difficulties, among them the obvious dangers of chaotification in making crypto-Hegelianism into the principles of a mass movement, in age also beset by the worst kind of positivist scientism.
One essay, Engels, Lukacs, and Kant's Thing in Itself, unwittingly and quite poignantly suggests the prophecy of the unstable post-Hegelian philosophic orphan spawning a dialectical tragedy that befell the whole project, in the era of Bernstein,and then Lenin.