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eBook The Principles of Scientific Management ePub

eBook The Principles of Scientific Management ePub

by Frederick Winslow Taylor

  • ISBN: 1420931199
  • Category: Job Hunting and Careers
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Frederick Winslow Taylor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Digireads.com (January 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 84
  • ePub book: 1607 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1241 kb
  • Other: txt mbr lit doc
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 735

Description

by. Taylor, Frederick Winslow, 1856-1915.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. New York, London, Harper & Brothers.

The Principles of Scientific Management (1911) is a monograph published by Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor was an American. Taylor was an American manufacturing manager, mechanical engineer, and then a management consultant in his later years

But American engineer FREDERICK WINSLOW TAYLOR (1856-1915) broke new ground with this 1919 essay.

But American engineer FREDERICK WINSLOW TAYLOR (1856-1915) broke new ground with this 1919 essay. You're either a scholar who's already quite familiar with Taylor and know why you want to read the original, or you're a student who's been assigned to read the book.

Although he called his principles "scientific management", Taylor does not seem to have been much of a scientist himself, relying on others to. .The Principles of Scientific ManagementPaperback. Frederick Taylor Winslow.

Although he called his principles "scientific management", Taylor does not seem to have been much of a scientist himself, relying on others to derive simple equations from his time-and-motion measurements. However, he did clearly identify a problem which continues to plague most workplaces today: most workers, either deliberately or inadvertently, work in a manner which is far below their productive potential; consequently, most businesses could be more successful, most employees could be paid more, and most countries could be wealthier, if only workers acted more efficiently.

But American engineer FREDERICK WINSLOW TAYLOR (1856-1915) broke new .

Wherein do the principles of scientific management differ essentially from those of ordinary management? Second. Why are better results attained under scientific management than under the other types?

Wherein do the principles of scientific management differ essentially from those of ordinary management? Second. One of the principal objects of the following pages will be to give a satisfactory answer to these questions. The Finest Type of Ordinary Management. Before starting to illustrate the principles of scientific management, or task management as it is briefly called, it seems desirable to outline what the writer believes will be recognized as the best type of management which is in common use.

Frederick Winslow Taylor It is in this volume that Frederick Winslow Taylor gave the theory of scientific management its clearest airing

Frederick Winslow Taylor. This book is not merely the precursor of modern organization and decision theory, it is in many respects its origin. A seminal work: an often misinterpreted work: and an indipensable source of administrative theory. Arch T. Dodson, Cornell University This brief essay by the founder of scientific management has served for nearly a century as a primer for administrators and for students of managerial techniques. It is in this volume that Frederick Winslow Taylor gave the theory of scientific management its clearest airing. Born in 1856, Taylor began work at age eighteen as an apprentice to a pattern-maker and as a machinist.

He was one of the first management consultants. Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era (1890s–1920s)

Bibliographic information. The principles of scientific management.

Bibliographic information. Frederick winslow taylor.

Frederick Winslow Taylor well-known as the founder of scientific management was the first to recognize and emphasis the need for adopting a scientific approach to the task of managing an enterprise.

Considering that Frederick Winslow Taylor is often called 'The Father of Scientific Management' and that his approach is also often referred to, as Taylor's Principles, or Taylorism, the impact on the field of business strategy of Frederick Winslow Taylor's "The Principles of Scientific Management" is undeniable. This is the treatise from which all others sprout, a truly lasting and important work of management science.

Comments

Drelalen Drelalen
Let's face it; if you're thinking about buying The Principles of Scientific Management, you don't need a review. You're either a scholar who's already quite familiar with Taylor and know why you want to read the original, or you're a student who's been assigned to read the book. I suppose an historian could offer a useful review of how this edition differs from other editions, but I can't do that.

I would, however, like to point out that the book is very readable, and that reading it gave me, for one, a much richer appreciation for the context in which Taylor was devising his theory, for the types of labor he was envisioning as applications. Most importantly, reading the original text surprised me with Taylor's thoughtfulness about his workers' well-being and how to convince them to accept Taylorist management. Taylor clearly had an intuitive grasp of worker psychology, which he did not formalize and which thus was not present in the brief summaries of Taylor I had learned.

So if you're one of the few people who is (a) interested in Taylor's work but (b) not sure it's worth the time to actually read Taylor, instead of simply relying on textbook summaries, I would like to urge you to pick it up. It's a quick read, and will add a great deal to the crude caricatures that I, at least, had learned.
Gerceytone Gerceytone
"The most important object of both the workman and the management should be the training and development of each individual in the establishment, so that he can do (at his fastest pace and with the maximum of efficiency) the highest class of work for which his natural abilities fit him," according to Frederick Taylor in this book. The book, first published almost 100 years ago, was a leading source of management theory in the first half of last century.

Those who have taken a class on management theory may have come away with the impression that Taylor's Scientific Management was superseded by McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y, with Theory X representing the superseded command-and-control Taylorism and Theory Y representing a more enlightened participative form of management. This caricature is far from the truth, although Taylor does display some amusing attitudes:

"The workman who is best suited to handline pig iron is unable to understand the real science of doing this class of work. He is so stupid that the word `percentage' has no meaning to him, and he must consequently be trained by a man more intelligent than himself into the habit of working in accordance with the laws of this science before he can be successful."

Although he called his principles "scientific management", Taylor does not seem to have been much of a scientist himself, relying on others to derive simple equations from his time-and-motion measurements. However, he did clearly identify a problem which continues to plague most workplaces today: most workers, either deliberately or inadvertently, work in a manner which is far below their productive potential; consequently, most businesses could be more successful, most employees could be paid more, and most countries could be wealthier, if only workers acted more efficiently.

The book was clearly written in a different time and culture, and the manual-labour-type examples that Taylor uses are less relevant now that most such jobs have been mechanised or exported. However, the challenge for management still remains: the hunt for productivity improvements which bring benefits for everybody and result in greater co-operation and improved relations between the labour force and management.
LONUDOG LONUDOG
I couldn't figure out why this copy of the book was so much cheaper than others. Now I know. Printing is bad in several places throughout the book and the title page. The back page has the same print date as my order so I suspect this is a private print on demand company. If you are looking for a solid, quality, complete copy of this book then pay the extra money. If you want a quick reference and can overlook the odd printing then this will work. A side note that I find it ironic the print quality is poor on a book about quality. Taylor is probably rolling over in his grave!
Iseared Iseared
The principles of scientific management has been waiting on my bookself for me to pick it up and actually read it for quite a while. Taylors book has had such an impact on the modern management ideas that I simply had to read the original work.

Before reading the book, I had my opinion ready (which is not a good thing). The ideas must be stupid, I thought. However, when starting to read the book, I was taken by the situation described by Taylor and the thinking he had behind his theory. Much of it made sense, at the time and was not so stupid at all. I've thus read it in one sit (it's not very thick either). So what's it about?

Taylor's ideas were about studying the work and finding the best method for doing work and then training the workers in following this best method. Finding this best method is "the science" and management is very much responsible for finding and improving the work of the workers. So, this creates the separation of planning and execution, which is often mentioned when talking about Taylorism.

Why did he do this? Much of the reasoning, which is very visible in his dialog between worker and manager, is that workers are too stupid to improve their own work. They have no education and they wouln't be able to actually think about their work and improve it. This might have been a fact in his life. However, if this is still true today, personally I would doubt it.

Taylor considered workers stupid. He makes quotes like "A trained gorilla would probably be better in the job than these man" (not exact quote). These statements made me very uncomfortable and therefore I've long doubted about whether it should be a 3 or 4 star rating.

I've still decided on a 4 start rating. The book is a classic and very valid in his time. I recommend everybody to read it AND REALIZE THAT TODAYS WORLD IS NOT THE SAME. Thus take the good ideas (improving your work) but leave the ideas which were related to their time (strict separation planning and execution).

Worth reading.